North Carolina Newspapers

    THE DAILY TAR HEEL
Sociology Grad
J Campos News Brief
October 9, 1970
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School Among Best
by Greg Lloyd
Staff Writer
UNC's Graduate School in Sociology
has been ranked the seventh best
graduated sociology training department
in the nation.
The ranking resulted from the
American Council on Education's Survey
of Graduate Education in 1969.
This high degree of achievement
attained by the graduate school is the
Visit Action
Hit By Petition
Continued from page one
The penalty was interpreted by Dean
of Men Fred Schroeder to preclude the
student from playing a varsity sport,
holding an office of a fraternity or
holding an elected office while on
probation.
The student was tried by the
administrative board after Student
Legislature refused to allow student
courts to try residents for violating an
administration policy.
Fourth floor James, along with Project
Hinton and Carr dormitory, voted several
weeks ago to reject the administration's
policy and accept the Student
Legislature's self-determination policy.
The administration Open House
Agreement allows for visitation from
noon to 1 a.m. on weekdays and from
noon to 2 a.m. on weekends.
The self-determination policy passed
by the Student Legislature gives each
individual living unit the right to
determine its own visitation policy,
including seven-day, 24-hour visitation.
Application
Applications are being accepted for
the Danforth Graduate Fellowships
program.
Interested students should talk to
Dean Frank M. Duffey before Nov. 1.
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goal of the entire Department of
Sociology, according to Dr. Gerhard
Lenski, chairman of the department.
Lenski explained the basic purpose of
the Sociology Department is to
contribute to liberal education by
informing students about society-where
it comes from and where it is going.
"Sociology, to me, should be the
study ot the trajectory of human history
and the forces that shaped that
trajectory," he remarked.
Since becoming chairman in the fall
semester of 1969, Lenski has been
interested in providing the best possible
program of undergraduate instruction.
One way he is accomplishing this is
insuring qualified and competent teaching
in the department by getting senior
faculty members to teach introductory
cources. Also, he is encouraging more
seminar courses because they "knit
together the varied experiences of people
within the department."
"From these varied viewpoints, one
can see that sociology is constantly
changing. It's not enough to fill heads
with facts because they become outdated.
It would be more helpful if I tell you the
forces that shape history," he continued.
Lenski's second goal is to build the
department as a research and graduate
training center. Success has been obvious
as seen by the high national ranking of
the graduate school and the many faculty
research projects ranging from urban
research to studies of Negro farmers'
co-operatives in the south.
His third goal is to maintain a stable
financial base for the department. This
job is becoming increasingly difficult as a
result of federal government cutbacks on
graduate scholarships.
Despite the hardships, Lenski feels the
faculty of the Sociology Department is
one of the best on campus, offering
nearly forty courses concerning
introductions to sociology, social
organization, population-ecology,
intergroup relations and social
psychology.
There are approximately 30 sociology
professors, 300 undergraduate majors and
95 graduate students now working in the
Department of Sociology.
The department was established in
1920 under the direction of Howard W.
Odum who became the first department
chairman.
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UNCShouldNotHaveUtilities
by Bill Pope
Staff Writer
Chapel Hill Mayor Howard Lee told
members of the Faculty Club Thursday
he would like the University to get out of
the utilities business.
Speaking before the first monthly
meeting of the faculty " club of this
academic year, the mayor said, "the
university should get out of the utility
business because municipalities should
control these matters."
He said the quality of service might
improve if local municipalities took over
utilities.
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Tom Blackburn looks on as his friend,
Mickey Hanes, puts his initials in the wet
cement around the - new brickwork
outside Bingham.
The University owns and operates
water, sewer, phone and electrical
operations for Chapel Hill and Carrboro.
The mayor spoke on 'The Problems of
Interaction Between the Town of Chapel
Hill and the University."
Lee also said he backs the university's
position on the public transportation
system.
The University officials have said UNC
should not have to subsidize a city bus
system for Chapel Hill, but that the
subsidy should be left up to the student
government.
Mayor Lee said the traffic problem in
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Population experts, urban pinners
and businessmen will meet to discuss
"Population Options and Priorities for
Commerce and Industry. I9T0-:000"on
the University campus Oct. 21-23.
The conference is being sponsored by
the Carolina Population Center.
Major speakers in a Lst of more than
30 contributors to the conference will
include N.C. Gov. Robert Scott; Philip
Mauser, population expert from the
University of Chicago; Paul N YKisaker.
Princeton University expert in public
affairs and urban planning; Lord
Llewelyn-Davies of the British "New
Towns" program; W. Graham Clay tor, Jr.,
president of the Southern Railway Co
and Sen. Robert Packwood of Oregon.
A special postscript to the conference
will be an illustrated public lecture by
Paolo Soleri, environmental designer
whose recent shows of "arcologies" at the
Whitney and Corcoran galleries have
gained widespread attention.
Goals of the conference are "to
examine implications for commerce and
industry of current world population
trends, to define options still at hand for
avoiding the severe population problems
evident elsewhere in the U.S. and the
world, and to consider ways where by
leaders in commerce and industry can
influence the choice of more rational
sty les of future growth."
The North Carolina School of the
Arts Orchestra will present an
"international concert" Tuesday at 9:15
p.m. in Memorial Hall.
The concert, in honor of the
Conference of International Relations
Chapel Hill is created in part by the
university and "in part, by the lack of
planning by the city."
The mayor said interaction between
the university and town has increased
during his administration.
"Students are much more involved in
the affairs of Chapel Hill," he said, "and
the town is concerned about the actions
of the university."
Lee said he has talked to more
students and lectured more classes at the
University than any mayor in Chapel Hill
history. t,
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Among the North Atlantic Nations which
opens Tuesday, b free and open to the
public. Hur,garianhom Nicholas
Harsanyi. music director and conductor
of the widely acclaimed
Chamber Orchestra. will
conductor.
In the spunt of North
Princeton
Nr guest
Carolina's
International Month Celebration, the
program Ul include works by German.
Itahan and Hurgarun composers. The
orchestra will play the "Fury Jr. t hi
Overture. by Weber; "Trittko
BetticeLhano." by Rc-spighi; and The
Hary Janos Suite, by KoUaly.
The School of Pharmacy of the
University is breaking all its 74 year old
enrollment records.
The 1974 class has 50 females in a
total enrollment of 142 students. That
makes this class 35.2 percent of the fairer
sex. Actually 155 of the 565 total
students are female -or 27.5 percent. The
national average last year was 20 percent.
Dr. George P. I lager, dean of the
school, attributes the dramatic increase in
female pharmacy students to the
realization that this profession has many
advantages over the traditional careers of
teacher, nurse or secretary.
The UNC School of Pharmacy has
more than doubled its enrollment in less
than six years.
Tar Heel author Paul Green will read
from his new book, "Home to My
Valley," at the first meeting of the UNC
Philological Club on Wednesday, Oct. 14.
The meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m.
in the Faculty Lounge of Dey Hall.
During the worker's strike last spring.
Lee said, there was more communication
between his office, Chancellor J. Carly le
Sitterson and President William C. Friday
than ever before.
During the worker's strike, he said, the
three met several times, once at 3 a.m. in
the Chapel Hill Police Department.
"The University and the town need to
work together with each other," Lee
commented, "both need to concentrate
on living together.
"I stand for progressive partnership
between UNC and Chapel Hill," Lee said.
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