North Carolina Newspapers

    October 9, 1970
UNC, Gamecocks
Statistical Rivals
After Vandy Fight
Good
If S
if eeiinm
Page Four THE DAILY TARHEEL
1
by Mark Whicker
Sports Writer
Although Carolina's 10-7 win over
Vanderbilt last Saturday night in
Nashville was hardly a masterpiece, junior
linebacker Jim Webster feels that it
helped the Tar Heels immensely in
preparation for South Carolina tomorrow
afternoon.
"I feel better going into this game now
than I would have if we had played South
Carolina right after the Maryland game,
which we won 53-20," says Webster.
"We had to fight for our lives at
Vanderbilt. We proved that our team has
a lot of character-there were no quitters
out there.
. "We made a lot of mistakes that I'm
sure we won't make this week against the
Gamecocks," Webster concludes.
It was the best individual game for
Webster since he broke his leg at Florida
last season.
"The hot weather had been bothering
me a lot in the first three games," he
points out. "It was cool in Nashville, and
maybe that's the reason why I played a
better game."
Webster has been unable to win his
starting job back from Ricky Packard,
who would be an All-American contender
with 30 extra pounds.
But the two are shuttled in and out by
Coach Bill Dooley for relatively equal
amounts of time.
Webster was a hard-running halfback
Hart, McCauley
Still Big Names
GREENSBORO, N.C.-Duke's Leo
Hart in total offense and passing and
North Carolina's Don McCauley in
rushing are still the bit names in the
Atlantic Coast Conference individual
football statistics, but sophomore Steve
Jones of the Blue Devils is becoming a
figure in the spotlight.
Jones, a 195-pound fullback, shares
the scoring lead with McCauley, each
having 24 points, and is the leader in
punting with a fine 42.9 average. Perhaps
more important is the fact that he is
among the leaders in four other divisions.
The nation's seventh-ranking
all-purpose performer in last week's
NCAA statistics, Jones is currently the
No. 10 man in total offense in the ACC,
third in rushing, eighth in receiving and
second in kickoff returns.
For a young man who didn't get to
play a great deal of freshman ball a year
ago because of injuries, Jones is off to a
fine start as a varsity performer. He is
averaging 74.8 yards per game in total
offense, the exact same figure he has to
rank third in rushing. He has caught 12
passes for 126 yards and returned eight
kickoffs for a 24.5 average. -:
1 rcCauleyy' who r fell", below the
100-yard rushing figure for the first time
this season at Vanderbilt Saturday night
when he was limited to 75, continues to
hold a comfortable lead in the
ground-gaining department. The Garden
City, N.Y., senior is averaging 132.3 yards
per contest and has a 5.5 play average.
Clemson's Ray Yauger, second to
McCauley in last year's final figures,
jumped into second place on the strength
of a 110-yard day at Georgia Tech last
week. The Tiger star has an 86.8 game
average.
Hart, like McCauley, is way ahead in
total offense and passing. The Kinston,
N.C. senior has a 204.8 total offense
game average while South Carolina
quarterback Tommy Suggs is second at
149.5. McCauley ranks third in his
division. Hart and Suggs are also one-two,
respectively, in passing. The Duke
rifleman is averaging 18.3 completions
per game while Suggs has a 10.8
completion figure. Jeff Shugars of
Maryland is third at 1 0.0.
Wes Chesson of Duke continues to
lead the receivers witrf31 catches for 357
yards and a 7.8 per game average. Doug
Hamrick of South Carolina and Maryland
sophomore Don Ratliff are tied for
second with 1 6 catches apiece.
Other individual leaders include South
Carolina's Bo Davies in interception
returns, Dick Harris also of, the
Gamecocks, in kickoff returns and Rich
Searl "of Duke in punt returns. Ken
Craven of North Carolina leads South
Carolina's Billy DuPre by only point in
the kick-scoring department, 22 points to
21. Craven, DuPre and Dave Wright of
Duke all have kicked field goals each.
for Parkland High in Winston-Salem, and
received offers from Illinois, Colorado,
and the ususal assortment of area schools.
He was moved to linebacker upon his
arrival at Chapel Hill, and prefers his
present locale despite the lack of
headlines.
"On defense, you have a lot more
emphasis on the whole unit than on the
individual," Webster relates. "When we
play a good game, they usually say the
defense', and when the offense does well,
a back is usually singled out."
Today's fashionable offensive shifts
put more pressure on Webster, Packard,
and John Bunting. The linebackers often'
have to call out different formations after
lining up, and crowd noises can impair
the hearing of a defensive tackle or back.
So Dooley relies on the quickness of
Webster who says his healed leg is feeling
better every day.
The Heels have kept winning despite
the loss of Rusty Culbreth, who suffered
a knee injury in the State game.
"The spectators can't see it," says
Webster, "but we lost more than just a
good defensive back or a good punt
returner. Rusty is one of the team's
leaders and adds a lot of our spirit.
"But they ought to give his
replacement, Greg Ward, a lot of credit,"
continues Webster. "He made several
good plays at the end of the Vanderbilt
game after we scored.
"I was never worried that our offense
would score, but I was concerned about
stopping them when they got the ball
back. It was nothing new we have
started out behind in every game except
State."
After watching the films of the
Gamecocks, Webster rates Paul Dietzel's
current edition ahead of the '69 Peach
Bowl team.
"They're bigger than last year," he
reveals, "and they seem to have more
speed. Tommy Suggs is also a fine
quarterback.
"But I thought we were just as good
last season, although we lost 146. It was
just like this year's Vanderbilt game,
except we were on the losing end."
Webster says that South Carolina will
rely on a sweep play similar to Green
Bay's dreaded end run in the mid-sixties.
But there is no Warren Muir this season to
keep the defense honest.
As in previous games, , Webster feels
that the opponents will be trying to pass.
"The linebackers get a lot of. defensive
credit these days," he says, "but I'd like
to say something about our defensive
tackles. Flip Ray and Bud Grissom are
two of the best in the country."
And just about any team would covet
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REFEREE UHU,
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REMEMBER -
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Jimmy Webster
Dooley's assortment of linebackers,
especially since Webster, Packard and
Bunting will return next season.
"I think we can go to a bowl
Webster says. "We're playing them as
-(hey come on the schedule, of course, but
fl hope we get to play Florida somewhere,
may be in a bowl game."
He's remembering that long day in
Gainesville last October, where his career
was almost ended in his sophomore year.
'The things that you work hard to get,
you appreciate them more," Jim Webster
says, anticipating an afternoon of sweat,
strain and triumph tomorrow.
The meeting between unbeaten
Carolina and South Carolina's defending
league champions Saturday takes on a
more interesting angle since the two rivals
rank one-two in most of the Atlantic
Coast Conference team statistical
divisions.
According to the latest figures released
by the league's Service Bureau, the Tar
Heels are out front in six departments
and the Gamecocks are second in every
case. In the 11 team categories the two
Carolina schools are the leaders in all but
two.
North Carolina takes a 4-0 record into
the game while South Carolina is 2-1-1.
The Gamecock's 7-7 tie with N.C. State
two weeks ago took some of the luster
off the attraction, but it still provides the
biggest hurdle for both as they seek the
crown South Carolina won last season
with a perfect 6-0 ACC slate.
In total offense, the Tar Heels are
averaging 410.3 yards per game while the
Gamecocks have a 401.5 figure, a
difference of only 8.8 yards. To further
Chapel Hill Down
uinday Hace
Sets
Chapel Hill Downs, the South's newest
Motocross race track, will feature its
second race of the season- Sunday at 2
p.m., complete with a $300 purse.
The track, located 10 miles west of
here on NC54, is a closed circuit, up and
down hill course of .7 miles.
The first race there was held Sept. 27,
with 50 drivers participating. More than
1,000 spectators attended that race.
The winners of the September race,
which boasted a $250 purse, included:
Mini class: 1st, Jay Totten,
Durham-Yamaha 90; 2nd, Martin Yount,
Durham Yamaha 90.
lOOcc class: 1st, Joe Harris,
Eden Suzuki 97; 2nd, George Hayes,
Cary-Honda 100; 3rd, Tony Mitchell,
Durham-Honda 100.
175cc class: Tie for 1st, John Canady,
Raleigh-Ossa 175, Robert Sharp,
.Knightdale-Yamaha 171; 2nd, Don
-Debnam, Knightdale Yamaha 125; 3rd,
pui Johnson, Raleigh Yamaha 125;-
250cc class: 1st, Eric Hartley, Chapel
Hill-Maico 250; 2nd, Tom Blocker,
Cary-Bultaco 250; 3rd, Frank Guy,
Wilmington Bultaco 244;
Open class: 1st, Bill Withers,
Winston-Salem-Maico 350; 2nd, Richard
Chambers, Raleigh-Yamaha 360; 3rd,
Robert Lovill, Mt. Airy-CZ 360.
show the closeness. South Carolina is
averaging 5.1 yards pr play while North
Carolina has a 5.0 average. The
Gamecocks have totaled 1.606 yards on
314 plays while the Tar Heels have gained
I. 641 on 325.
On the defensive side of the ledg-r.
there's only a difference of three yards
between the two teams. North Carolina
has allowed its four foes 941 yards for a
235.3 game average and a 3.7 phy
average while South Carolina has given up
953 yards for a 23S 3 game figure and a
3.6 play average.
The other categories in which the Tar
Heels and Gamecocks are first 3nd
second, respectively, are rushing, both
offensively and defensively, scoring and
scoring defense. North Carolina has us
biggest edge in both divisions of rushing,
averaging 275.5 yards per game on
offense and 75.5 on defense.
The Tar Heels are averaging 25.5
points per game while the Gamecocks
have a 23.5 figure. In scoring defense.
North Carolina h3S allowed 37 points for
a 9.3 average and South Carolina 44 for a
II. 0.
South Carolina, by completing 20 of
33 passes in a 24-7 win over Virginia Tech
last week, jumped from third place tc
first in the passing department. It now
has a game average of 208.5 yards while
Duke is second at 206.8.
The Gamecocks also lead in pass
defense with an even 100 yards per game
average and in kickoff returns with an
average of 29.7 yards per return.
Wake Forest is the leader in punting,
averaging 42 yards per kick, while Duke
leads in punt returns with an average of
10.4 yards per return.
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1-A state (abbr.)
4-River in Italy
6-Gravestone
11 -Buy back
13 -Cylindrical
15- Teutonic deity
16- Field
flowers
18- Exclamation
19- River In
Siberia
21-Stupefy
22 Prepare for
print
24-Great
bustard
26 Location
28 - Frozen water
29- Bar legally
31-Takecareof
33- SymboJ for tin
34- lre!and
3 6-Food
program
38-Parent
(coltoq.)
40-Solar disk
42-Chailenges
45-Arabian
garment
47-Pack away
49- Roman
tyrant
50- rbetan
priest
52 Snare
54- Symbol for
tantalum
55- Conjunction
56- Akin
59-A continent
(abbr.)
61-Retreat
63-Womaway
65- Scorches
66- A state (abbr.)
67- Before
DOWN
1- Exist
2- European
dormica
3- Paid notice
4- Edible seeds
5- Leavesout "
6- Restricted
7 Golf mound
8 -Gaelic
9- French article
10-Science of moral
values and duties
12-Man's
nickname
14-Consumed
17-Fit
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23- Roman gods
24- Fa roe Islands
whirlwind
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27-Wifeof
Geraint
30-Fruit
seeds
32-College official
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cheek
39 Degrades
41 -Girl's name
43- Rubber on
pencil
44 -Conjunct ion
46-Part of
"to be"
48-Liquid
51 -Solo
53-Persian fairy
57-Be mistaken
5-8-Note of scale
CO-Fru it drink
fc2-Symbol for
tellurium
C4 -Prefix: down
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