North Carolina Newspapers

    Page Two
THE DAILY TAR HEEL
October 11, 1970
ttmdeet
In
Feed.
by Lou Bonds
Slajf Writer
The Finance Committee of Student
Legislature froze the Orientation
Commi.sion's funds Thursday because of
irrepi!?v ies in the commission expense
ace. -
The Orientation Commission's picnic
could result in a loss of over SI ,000 to SL,
which is back by student financing.
In Other words, the legislature's loss is
the student's loss also.
Student Legislature last spring
appropriated $3,000 to meet immediate
expenses of the commission's orientation
picnic.
News Analysis
The appropriation met the $2,961 cost
of the contracted price to Chicken Box, a
firm in Durham that was contracted to
provide 4,000 dinners for the orientation
, picnic. A sum of S!00 was contracted to
Coca-Cola Company to provide soft drinks
for the picnic.
The Orientation Commission was
expected to charge 80 cents a dinner in
order to collect the money legislature had
appropriated to meet the immediate costs
of the picnic.
However, the commission delivered
only 2,500 dinners out of the food that
was provided for 4,000 dinner
distribution.
The commission reported to Finance
Committee Chairman Robert Grady a net
profit of $2,097 leaving a deficit of $913.
Last week, the Orientation Commission
requisitioned $914 extra to meet the
picnic's expenses. Grady reported before
Student Legislature's Thursday session
that the requisition would reach beyond
"$1,000."
M
ofehead Governor
Continued from page one
will have a place to keep its records and
supplies and have its social functions.
Saunders is working not only ' for
Morehead, but for the entire residence
college system through the Chancellor's
Committee on Residence College Living
(CURL).
"We're hoping to move Project Hinton
to Whitehead and turn James into a coed
The Daily Tar Heel is published
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AW
oser
Mi
xup
The amount the commission
requisitioned covered other categories
than the picnic, but Grady said picnic costs
were being multiplied by later requisitions.
Necessary funds needed to meet picnic
costs would total over the S914
requisitioned.
The Orientation Commission
reportedly told Grady that the deficit was
due to "inexperienced students serving the
plates."
The meaning was that student waiters
had served larger plates than expected thus
totalling only 2,500 dinners instead of the
expected 4,000.
On the surface, Student Legislature
would be absorbing a deficit of at least
S914. However, the administration agreed
last spring to share half of the picnic's cost
with Student Legislature.
In the words of Assistant Dean of Men
Richard Stevens, the administration had
agreed to match the student government
outlay for orientation "as close as is
possible."
The administration would match at
least $457 of the picnic's deficit if the
Orientation Commission offered $2,097 to
meet legislature's expenditures.
The question is this: "Will legislature
offer extra expenditures to the
commission to meet apparent
overexpenditures?"
The Finance Committee requested
extra time to study the commission's
requisitions. Their request indicates either
they are unsure of the amount of food
Chicken Box in Durham gave to the picnic
or they are uncertain about the
proportions of food issued.
In either case, students will suffer a
financial loss because an additional
amount of student fees will be needed to
pay for the deficit of the picnic.
The Finance Committee of Student
Legislature froze the commission's funds
to find out why students should pay the
additional amount.
It was the only expedient action they
could take in the students' interests.
dorm. This would involve more students in
the residence college Program since only
two floors are now occupied in Project
Hinton.
'The members of CURL also want to
change Connor back to a men's dorm and
make Joyner, Connor, Alexander and
Winston members of one colleee."
Presently Connor, Alexander and
Winston are independent. Joyner belongs
to James Residence College.
Saunders hopes to run for chairman of
the Men's Residence Council in the spring.
Steve Saunders
C
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TAKE OuT PlZZA
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115 N. COLUMBIA ST. COFV THE SQOftfeO
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ha. I y0 , tr . '-f-', ; .ty - i 1
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wpie packed sliuumci to Miouider in Saturday's sellout
game against South Carolina. The Tar Heels bowed to the
Petty Traditions Going Out
Continued from page one
Delta Upsilon had a "remarkably good"
rush. "The actual flow of men was not as
great, but the number of pledges was
greater," commented Todd Llewellyn.
"More people that go through rush are sure
it's what they want."
Only Sigma Alpha Epsilon had no
pledges. Jim Donahue placed the reason
on"our stringent, one ball policy."
We're the hardest fraternity on campus
to pass," he said, "and we want to remain a
small brotherhood."
The fraternity did pledge one rushee
whose father requested he wait another
semester.
'We couldn't find 19 people good
enough," Donahue added.
Most of the fraternities contacted did
feel that fraternities were changing for the
better.
"Most people are fed up with the Vush'r
as such," said Merrili of Sigma Chi. "Now if
is a lot more informal. . '
. "Men used to sell themselves to
fraternities," he added. "Now fraternities
axe selling themselves to the men."
Russo said, "The fraternities are
an effort to find the people." He cited the
fact that only 45 men at UNC signed up to
pledge, but 250 pledged.
"The fraternity system is not perfect,"
said Gordon of TEP, "but neither is
democracy. Fraternities serve a good
purpose," he added. "It's a livable way of
life."
Mills of AK Psi said, "This fraternity is
serving a useful purpose. The contacts and
friendships are great. Nobody puts on any
fakes." -
"A fraternity is not necessary today,"
commented Manning of Phi Sigma Kappa.
'The choice is left open to the individual
student."
Knedlik of Delta Tau Delta agreed that
the necessity of joining is gone. The lesser
interest, he said, is partly due to apathy.
"Fraternities are stereotyped by most
people," he added, "as a drinkand raise hell
place. But a lot of people don't realize the
close ties you make."
l.op
it
CVA9L UlLLNA.
Gamecocks 35-21
Fraternities did suffer some this
semester, according to most rush
chairmencontacted, but "no one need hold
their breath as far "as fraternities are
dying," said Todd Llewellyn, IFC rush
chairman.
"You get a distorted view from fall
rush," said Donahue of Sigma Alpha
Epsilon. "Fall rush is all a matter of who
you know. Most boys who rushed knew
they wanted to pledge. You can't judge a
fraternity's death on fall rush."
m
LEHIJLP
UL
I II
Name
Address
City
KV.VAVAWW.V.
.......V.'.V.V.
n it til
,
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1 -
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11 (2 W
All YOU CAN DRINK ONLY
yc OLD PIZZA. VILLKTAVERN
NEXT TO RECORD BfR - DOWN THE ALLEY
in Kenan Stadium.
"This may just be an off semester," said
Glover of Pi Kappa Phi. "If there are two
consecutive semesters of poor rush, then
maybe fraternities are really dying."
Russo, however, foresees a large spring
rush. "I predict at least 100 more people
will rush this spring than last spring."
Regardless of how one views the fall
rush, the consensus is: fraternities are
changing.
If they do not change, they may meet
their death.
MA
f
i
RECORDS, PRE-RECORDED
Ceamgiiiig
.and SET YOUR OWN PROFIT PICTURE
MEET and BEAT ALL COMPETITION
IF THIS IS YOUR BAG, CONTACT:
.A 1 1 1 II niCTOIDIITftDC I kl " i
v ill w 1 1 j i r i uu i j i j , i n .
A SUBSIDIARY OF SAM GOODY. INC.
MR. AQUILINA Phone (212) 786
OR USE THIS COUPON:
MR. AQUILINA, co SMG DISTRIBUTORS, Inc.
46-35 54th Road, Maspeth,. N .Y . 11378.
Please send THE HAPPENING to:"
College
State
7 - ii PM.
C 11 f 1 A IT" v
Car Da m aged
By Morrison
After Game
by HarTV Smith
Suff Writer
Dozens
Residence
of residents of Morrvr
College stood alor.g t'-,:
dormitory's nine balconies throwing u?.
water balloons and insults at GamecocV.
fans as they returned to their car
following Saturday's game.
The hecklers were not j.:: th?
disappointed Tar Heck, however. T;
South Carolina fans returned srr.t!e a-J
shouts of victory to the student1; who
watching the growing traffic jam ,-:
Manning Drive.
One South Carolina fan who had pa;'ej
his car on one of the brick sidewj';
outside of Morrison got more than
jeers from the crowd of students.
Joe Heilig III of Charleston. S C., a t C
student, cot the windshield of his Lte
model automobile broken. He said that
h3d just gotten into the car when a brea j
bag filled with water was thrown at the car.
smashing the windshield.
Neither he nor the passenger in the car.
Hal Shirley, another USC student, ue-f
injured.
Heilig and Shirley both said they ha J
seen students throwing bottles, balloors
and toilet paper from the balconies, but
neither saw the person who threw the
bread bag.
Witnesses in a nearby car pointed out
someone who was believed to have throve
the bag.
Shirley admitted
students at Morrison.
shouting to tht
Several residents of Morrison wen!
down to apologize to Heilig. Damage to the
car was limited to the windshield.
Campus police, investigating the
incident, reported relative quiet following
the game.
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TAPES, AUDIO
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