North Carolina Newspapers

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Opinions of The Daily Tar Heel are expressed on its editorial page. All
unsigned editorials are the opinion of the editor. Letters and columns
represent only the opinions of the individual contributors.
Susan Miller, Editor
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The UNC Board of Governors, the
body with authority over all 16 state
supported institutions of higher
learning in North Carolina including
East Carolina University, apparently
has little or no influence upon the
crucial issue of medical education in
North Carolina.
Politics is now the name of the game
on the medical education issue and it
seems that the legislature has completely
ignored the decision and reasons for the
decision of the Board of Governors not
to expand in the East Carolina med
school.
The ECU med school issue is the first
controversial issue that has faced the
board as well as the first issue in which
all power and authority has been
transplanted from the hands of the
board into the hands of the political
state legislature.
While the board carefully
commissioned an out-of-state body of
medical experts to study and make
recommendations on the problem of
increasing the number of doctors in
North Carolina and improving N.C.
health care, legislators govern their
decisions under the threat of the purse
strings of the Joint Appropriations
Committee. In turn for assurances that
(HI)?
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Susan Miller
Editor
Cathy Farrell, Managing Editor
Dill Welch, News Editor
David Eskridge, Associate Editor
Ksncy Rata, Associate Editor
Kevin McCarthy, Features Editor
ElSictt Varnock, Sports Editor
Tom Randolph, Photo Editor
Ernie Pitt, Night Editor
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The filing deadline for local and state
offices in the May 7 Democratic and
Republican primaries has passed, and the'
Democratic race for Orange Count
Commissioners will draw the most interest.
Seven Democrats are in the race for three
seats on the five member board.
In 1972, Flo Garrett, a 29 year old
housewife, and Richard Whitted, a 27 year
old black accountant led a narrow liberal
victory in the primary, Whitted winning by
43 votes out of 1 2,000. The two then swept to
a two-to one victory over the GOP
candidates.
The County Commissioners have
responsibility for health and welfare, in the
entire county, and police, water, sewer, and
zoning outside of Chapel Hill and Carrboro.
So far, oniy one progressive candidate has
emerged in the race, UNC YMCA director
Norm Gustaveson. Gustaveson will center
his campaign around better planning and
zoning, and better fiscal control over ttie .
county budget. Voters can use up to three
votes in the race, although they can use one
or two if they feel there are less than three
candidates thev can vote for.
Several other candidates have some
promise. Melvin Whitfield, a conservative
dairy farmer and an incumbent is no
intellectual, but he is fair and open minded.
Jan Pinney, owner of a country store, is also
fairly conservative, but will probably be able
to work well on the Board.
Two other Chapel Hill candidates are
running besides Gustaveson. George
Sprar.sy, co-owner of Huggins Hardware on;
Franklin Street, has been good on planning
issues in his 10 years on the Chapel Hill'
Planning Board, but conservative on most
other issues.
Sam Holton, a member of the Chapel Hill
School board, is regarded by many as fairly
moderate, but it is not known how much'
support he will be able to get.
Board Chirman Norman Walker has
Local
March 4, 1974
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pet projects be kept in or added to the
state budget, legislators one by one join
the proponents of ECU medical school
expansion.
The "compromise" proposal on the
East Carolina medical school issue is
really not a compromise with the Board
of Governors or with those against
immediate expansion of the ECU med
school. The bill goes directly against the
decision of the Board of Governors not
to expand the med school, as it calls for
increasing the number of students at the
one-year program now at ECU, adding
a second-year class and constructing a
$15 million basic science building. The
only leeway given the board in this
"compromise" is setting the dates for
this expansion.
It is difficult to tell whether UNC
could have done more to safeguard its
position on expansion of the ECU med
school and the improvement of medical
care in North Carolina. Perhaps it could
have done more, but it is apparent that
the "compromise" of the Joint
Appropriations Committee was reached
only to have the appearance of
compromise.
ECU proponents did not have to
compromise because the board has had
no power to wield in preserving its
stand.
The issue of how best to improve
health care and increase the number of
doctors in all parts of the state,
including rural eastern North Carolina,
has fallen by the wayside. The Board of
Governors' study outlined the least
expensive and the fastest ways to solve
this problem yet its recommendations
have been ignored.
Meanwhile the role of the Board of
Governors as a body to make decisions
on higher education in North Carolina
is in serious jeopardy.
But worse, because politics has taken
over educational decision-making, the
improvement of health care all over
North Carolina is also in serious
jeopardy.
(Editor's note: Tuesday's editorial
will compare the Board of Governors'
plan with the ECU med school plan.)
t 9
race offers
opposed much legislation on the County
Board that Garrett and Whitted have been
pushing for, but he has supported Orange
County bidding oh the UNC utilities.
Tom Bacon is a plumbing contractor from
Hillsborough who ran unsuccessful races for
the County Board in 1970 and 1972. His only
chance is probably in a runoff a month later.
With seven candidates running for three
seats, there is the possibility of no candidate
getting a majority, or only one or two getting
the magic one sixth of all the votes cast.
Another factor is the student vote. The
primary is on May 7, the next to last day of
exams, and many students may have already
left town. A big absentee ballot drive may
have to be undertaken.
Voter registration for the primary, which
also includes the important U.S. Senate race
will end April 8. Those already registered
don't have to re-register unless they have,
moved out of their precinct.
Norm Gustaveson has been a friend to
young people since he came to Chapel Hill.
He was active in many progressive causes,
from Civil Rights, Vietnam, Food Worker's
Strike, Cambodia, Vietnam, etc. Norm has
on many occasions bailed young people out
of jail who were charged with serious crimes.
At the "Y" he has been a constant,
counselor to many "generations" of UNC
students, and a friend to all.
I hope students who are voting in Orange
County will pay attention to the election
campaign for County Commissioner. It is an
important race for the future of the County.
In the next few months, I will try to discuss
the issues in depth, and try to comment on
other primary races such as State Senate and
U.S. Senate, (the only Republican primaries
arc for State Senate and State Supreme
Court).
by Lena Stemes
end
Dr. Takty CrUt
(Editor's Note: seventh in a series on
contraception.)
There are a number of new methods of
birth control now available to women in
North Carolina. Among these are:
Pills. Low dosage estrogen pills,
containing only 20 to 30 milligrams of
estrogen, and the "mini pills' containing no
estrogen, are now being prescribed.
The low dosage and no estrogen pills cause
none of the side effects associated with the
higher estrogen pills headaches, nausea,
vomiting, weight gain and mastalgia. Many
women who could not take the higher
doasage pills will find that they can take the
newer ones.
On the other hand, as the estrogen dosage
is decreased or eliminated altogether, certain
other side effects appear in some women.
The higher estrogen pills helped control a
woman's mestrual cycle making periods
quite predictable. With the new pills new
problems may appear: Breakthrough
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'NOW YOU KNOW WHAT
Brent Mc Knight
Class
A student government office which
contributes nothing to the well-being of
students does not, in my opinion,
deserve to exist. It is a rather common
allegation that class officers contribute
nothing to student life. If valid, such an
allegation justifies the discontinuation
of these offices.
The charge is not valid in the case of
Senior Class officers (President, Brent
McKnight; Vice President, Ellanor
Graves; Secretary, Carol Ripley; and
Treasurer, Fred Kiger), and we feel the
interest
Round one of the student elections are
over, and the dust has not yet settled.
Assuming the Presidential runoff is between
Marcus Williams and El Libre, I believe that
Marcus Williams will be able to deal
effectively with the issues that face his office.
I think he will be able to work with White as
well as Black students.
In the editor's race, the Cooper-Turosak
vs. Campbell duel is also coming up,
although a possible suit charging Campbell
with over-spending may postpone the
election.
No matter who wins, the paper will not
collapse. But 1 believe that Cooper-Turosak
show more promise at being able to put
together a well-functioning staff.
Turosak's coverage of the Brookside
miner's strike was some of the most effective
reporting I have seen in a longtime, and he is
dedicated to the newspaper business.' Cooper
will be able to bring a good balance to the
overrall editorial board.
I don't believe people should write off
Cole Campbell because he has no
journalistic experience. He did a good job
with his DTH Alternative, and with some
conscientious conciliating efforts can
probably put the paper back together again.
The issue of overspending is an
important one, however, because the
credibility of the editor is one of his her most
important assets. Whether the candidates
liked it or not, a $200 spending limit was put
on this race over a year ago, and if a
candidate did not like the limit, he did not
have to run.
Persons interested in working to help
Duke Power's Brookside Miners and those
interested in working to make sure Duke
Power doesn't buy U.N.C.'s utilities, should
attend a meeting oj Orange County Citizens
for Alternate Power, tonight at 7p.m. in 217
Union.
:
bleeding, amenorrhea and heavier menstrual
flow.
These side effects are only minor and may
eventually disappear after several months. In
a small number of women, they are
bothersome enough that resort to the higher
estrogen pills is advised.
The failure rate of the higher dosage pills is
less than one percent. The low dosage
estrogen pills show only a slight increase in
pregnancy rates. With the mini pills,
however, the pregnancy rate is two to four
percent, equivalent to the IUD in
effectiveness.
Deproprovera. Another method which;
holds promise for the future is the injection
of hormones. Recently the Food and Drug
Administration approved deproprovera, a
progesterone preparation, for limited
prescription use.
Deproprovera is given as an injection
about every three months or so. It works
much like the pill in making the musuous
unreceptive to sperm. Some uncertainty
exist however, in the fact that we do not
THE PEASANTS THINK OF YOUR
HOUR OF MORNING!'
officers
time has arrived for clarification of our
work. With this in mind, we outline the
projects with which we have been most
concerned.
In response to a desire expressed by
many students, we, along with the
Student Union, the Alumni
Association, and the Music
Department, have organized a spring
festival for the final two weeks before
exams. Known as Springfest, the
celebration will include concerts by Sha-Na-Na,
Mission Mountain Wood Band,
the Fiori Baroque Ensemble of Boston,
the University Symphony and Choir,
and other groups to be announced.
Springfest will provide an opportunity
to relax and enjoy Carolina before
exams.
Work on Springfest exemplifies the
type of contribution class officers can
make. We have exerted every effort to
voice the desire for a spring festival and
to stir the support of organizations
which could make it a reality.
Our second major negotiating effort
has involved graduation. Seniors
expressed the need for re-evaluation of
various aspects of the traditional
ceremony. We, in turn, took these
suggestions to Administration officials.
letters to the editor
A A
euuer mnsrepireseraecii mcus
To the editor:
In response to Bob Hupman's letter
concerning amnesty.
I believe that a few facts must be corrected
that were presented in your letter. First, you
put the total of those in need of amnesty
at 14 million and critized the editorial for
greatly exaggerating. The government put its
figures like this: 52,000-plus draft resisters
known, 100,000-plus never registered,
32,557 AWOL or desertedw,20,000 draft
age men admitted to Canada, and 450,000
Vietnam Veterans discharged with less than
Honorable Discharge. That makes over
534,700-plus, which means that the editorial
didn't exaggerate as much as you
underestimated.
In your next paragraph you said, "they
had that chance back home when they could
have secured a CO. status, fled to Canada or
gone to jail for any lofty principals." The fact
is, Bob, that many local draft boards reject
many claims without even giving
consideration or reason. Many did not
attempt to gain CO. status simply because
they thought it hopeless and did not wish to
submit to it's harassments. Still others did
not possess the education or accessibility
that is necessary when asking for a CO.
status. Years ago, itwas nearimpossible for
anyone tb gain a CO. status, and those
people are still suffering.
You wish to have punishment. Bob, for
know how long it Lasts.
Menstrual cycles tend to be irregular if not
totally unpredictable with this method, but
again there are none of the estrogen related
side effects.
Deproprovera is not entirely new method
by the way. It has been used very sucessfully
in the past as a temporary means of birth
control, especially on women for a short
period after delivery.
Research is still being done to perfect an
injection that would act over a period of six
months, a year or even longer but at present
the three month injection is available for
women who can not use other methods.
Morning after pill. The Food and Drug
Administration in 1973 approved the use of
estrogen diethyistilbestrol (DES) as a
"morning after" pill. There are, however,
very strict limitations as to its use. It is not a
means of contraception and should be used
only as an emergency measure. It must be
taken in high dosages within 72 (preferably
24) hours after exposure and then taken for
five days.
DAYLIGHT SAVING AT THIS
clarify work
Our discussion dealth with changes in
music and robe color, although we also
sought input into the choice ot a
speaker. The results: additions to the
music program at graduation are under
evaluation by the Music Department
and the Administration. The color of
the robes has been changed from black
to Carolina blue. And the
Administration has expressed
willingness to consider future speaker
choices.
We have attempted to encourage
communication among Seniors byt
publishing a newsletter outlining our
projects and news items of common
interest. Funds allowed the printing of
only 300 copies per edition, and we
found the circulation to be inadequate.
We sought the help of the Alumni.
Association, and Alumni officials
agreed to devote the first page of the
Alumni Newsletter to the articles we
would normally have printed in our own
newsletter and to mail a copy to each
Senior. This edition has been printed
and is being mailed. As the end of the
year approaches, we plan to publish
another edition in this manner.
A fourth major project we have
organized is a series of debates on the
Energy Crisis. In the first debate, the
A
these deserters. You say a dodger did "go
back on his oath to the Constitution of these
United States." Since over 70 of the
American people favored withdrawal from
Vietnam, wasn't it those who went to fight
who did not follow their roles as Americans?
The problem of dying should not be directed
to those who are trying to achieve amnesty,
but to the U.S. government who has been
unable to answer that question. No one who
resisted the draft forced another to go in his
place. It was the government who forced
this, and it ought to be the government who
ought to be responsible for this problem, not
those who followed their conscience and
defied the law.
Finally Bob, you look to Roosevelt,
Truman, Wilson, and Eisenhower to say
what heroic ideas they had by not issuing
amnesty.
The fact is, that Truman issued amnesty
on 4 different occasions including some
1,523 individuals for evasion in W.W. II, and
a number convicted for desertion between
August 15, 1945 and June 25, 1950.
Wilson issued amnesty of some type on 2
occasions, Roosevelt one occasion, and even
George Washington issue amnesty.
No, Bob. You have many of the facts
misrepresented. Many believe these
individuals not to be cowards, but to be
braver than others simply because of the
situtations they subjected themselves to.
The "morning after" pill is very effective,
but should not be used repeatedly. It is not
recommended for women with a family
history of breast or gential cancer, or
a personal history of certain heart diseases,
blood clots, hepatitis or migraine headaches.
The only reported side effects to the
"morning after" pill include vomiting and
nausea.
Menstrual extraction. A new and
promising method of birth control
somewhere between "foresight
contraception" and "hindsight abortion" is
menstrual extraction, also known as
menstrual planning, menstrual regulation or
menstrual induction.
This procedure involves the vacuum
aspiration of the uterine lining with a few
weeks after a late menstrual period. (Up to
50 days of amenorrhea.)
This procedure itself is similiar to the
insertion of an IUD. The physician pushes a
small tube through the cervix into the uterus,
applies a vacuum at the proximal end of the
tube and pulls outs or aspirates the lining of
the uterus which is normally shed in
menstruation.
The menstural extraction is simple and
safe. A paracervical block is used and the
whole procedure takes about two hours.
Determination of pregnancy is not necessary
and there are no complications. Side effects
are minimal or non-existent.
Menstrual extractions are done at N.C.
Memorial Hospital in the Menstrual
Regulation Clinic on Monday afternoons.
Appointments are made through the
hospital by calling 966-2135. Cost is $75.
Prostaglandins. The use of prostaglandins
for abortion has become widespread.
Eventually it may replace the saline injection
entirely. It is a safe and reliable abortion
technique performed during the First 12
weeks of pregnancy.
The prostaglandins work by causing
uterine contractions which are strong
enough to expel the pregnancy tissue. There
are only a few side effects, including nausea
and vomiting.
NEXT: Future methods oj birth control,
including the male pill, the plug, releasing
hormones, and others.
(A special thanks to Dr. James R.
Ding) elder Jor his help in the preparation oj
this column.)
COPYRIGHT (C) 1974 by Lana Starnes
and Dr. Takey Crist. All rights reserved.
nation's second ranked debate team
Tom Dillard and Cole Campbell met
Jeff Allred and Walker Smith ranked
by at least one expert a the fourth best
team nationwide. In the second debate,
on Feb. 27, coaches Robert Cox and
Robert Branham faced Allred and
Smith in a discussion of strip mining. By
sponsoring these events we hope to
provide an opportunity to hear excellent
debating and thus to contribute to the
intellectual life of Carolina students.
Our work has not been limited to
these projects. We have sponsored a
forum for discussion of drop-add
problems, presented the movie, "Raisin
in the Sun," helped publicize the work of
the YMCA tutoring program,
considered proposals for restructuring
class offices, explored the possibilities of
obtaining blocks of tickets to sports
events for Seniors, and begun
preparation for the Senior class gift.
In these efforts we have tried to
contribute to the betterment of student
life for Seniors, as well as students of
other classes. We are confident our
work has not been in vain, and we hope
the newly-elected Senior Class officers
will carry forward and expand upon the
projects we have organized.
Tl fl
I do not claim to know the answer to tis
difficult question. But it is important that we
understand the facts.
Douglas Schuch
Granville Towers
Extend hours
for Woollen gym
To the editor: 13
Bravo Miss Boyce! I heartily agree with
your, suggestion that squash courts be
reserved on a first come, first serve basis. The
women squash players I've seen need all the
practice that they can get! But I would like to
go even further since I also have spent many
mornings calling from 7:45 to 8:00 only to be
told that all courts are full.
Woollen gym should also abolish reserved
faculty courts as well. And since virtually all
of the facilities in the gym are in constant use, '
I propose that it be kept open until 11:00. I'm
sure that many students would make use of
the extended hours.
The plans for a new gymnasium complex
is good news for those planning to come to
UNC in 1977, but corrective action should be
taken now to alleviate this critical shortage
of space.
Robert L. Kunka
Bolinwood Apts
    

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