North Carolina Newspapers

    6 Th DsiSy Ter Hstl Section A August 25, 1S75
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Sa n f o rd 's o res i d e n 1 1 a I earn pas
Gil
Continued from page one
about successful competition when the chiW
enters college.
Recent criticisms made by the
Department of Health, Education and
Welfare (H EW) concerning the University of
North Carolina system's desegregation plan
were "warranted on the surface" he said.
"HEW was a little hasty, though."
The department told the university system
that its decision to place a proposed
veterinary school at N.C. State University
instead of predominantly black North
Carolina A&T University was contrary to
the desegregation plan UNC had previously
filed with HEW. In July HEW threatened to
take action against the system if it refuses to
comply with the desegregation plan.
"The University is having a real struggle
changing its own way of thinking." l.ee said.
"Professional schools (such as the vet
school) need to be on black campuses. The
vet school would be an incentive for white
students to go to A & T. 'If a white student
wants to go to a vet school, he will have to go
ioa& i. ;
In every case HEW considers, he jjitf.
there are local controls that have to be
considered. Since HEW operates out 'ot
Washington, IXC. this cannot be done, j 9
remedy this, l.ee suggested the departrnnt
be decentralied. f :
Should l.ee decide to run. he will carry a
record to the people which includes the
initiation of a town bus system last ;ear
w hich, in its second six months of operation
carried I45.(X)0 more passengers than the
Raleigh bus system. f i.
He said he hopes that in the near luturctho
bus system will receive mass transit funds
from the federal government. Currently il
system is being subsidized by a $330,000
University contribution (which is recovered
by the sale of bus passes to students), town
taxes and revenue sharing. f
l.ee is also proud of increasing the mayor's"
accessibility to the people. "When ! came
here there wasn't even a mayor's office; not
even a broom closet." he said from Bis
spacious office in the new town municipal
building.
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university mall, chapel hill, north Carolina 27514 (919)967-8964
by Richard Whittle
Staff Vriter
Candidates for the 1976 Democratic
presidential nomination are a dime a 'dozen
these days. And one of the biggest problems
facing former North Carolina Gov. Terry
Sanford. who entered the race during the
summer, is raising the dozens of dimes it will
take to do so.
Sanford fund raisers are quick to cite a
number of reasons for the Duke University
president's financial woes, but the fact
remains that their difficulty in getting money
could undermine the campaign if they are
unable to overcome it within the next few
months.
Early in July, Sanford said he had hoped
to qualify in July for federal matching funds,
provided for in the new campaign finance
law. To qualify for matching funds,
candidates must raise 55,000 in
contributions of S250 or less in each of 20
states. To date, the Sanford campaign has
only been able to reach the $5,000 goal in five
states.
William R. Henderson. Sanford's state
finance director, told the Daily Tar Heel the
Sanford for President Committee expects
their candidate to qualify for matching funds
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by the end of September.
Henderson downplayed the notion that
qualifying for funds will be any problem and
emphasized that candidates cannot apply tor
'matching funds until Dec. 31.
Another indication that fund raising for
Sanford is going slowly is the relatively small
amount of money which has been raised in
North Carolina.
The ex-governor's goal is to raise at least
$750,000 in the state by early next year.
Failure to reach this goal would raise serious
questions as to the amount of support
Sanford could expect in next springs crucial
primary.
In 1972, Sanford hurriedly threw together
a presidential effort, only to be handed an
embarrassing defeat by Alabama Gov.
George Wallace in the North Carolina
primary. So this time around Sanford is
pinning his hopes on the chance he can grab
national headlines by beating Wallace in the
primary here next March.
In fact, Sanford has publicly stated he will
withdraw from the race if he doesn't defeat
Wallace in the North Carolina primary.
Sanford fund raisers are also counting on
North Carolina contributors to provide the
money they need to cultivate contributions
from elsewhere in the nation.
But as of the July 10, federal campaign
finance reporting deadline, the Sanford for
President Committee showed only a little
more than $50,000 had been contributed by
North Carolinians at that point.
While Henderson admitted that the fund
raisers efforts have not been entirely
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satisfactory, he said, The money is
beginning to roll in now. He attributed this
to some 50 meetings he and others ha yc
held across the state this summer to heighten
Sanford supporters' interest in thx
campaign. j
"We've spent this time in cultivation," said
Henderson, a veteran Sanford ally. "Now. in
September, we'll get serious."
Henderson and other Sanford insiders list
various reasons for their limited fund raising
success so far, and they say Sanford is not the
only political candidate with financial
troubles.
The major obstacle in the effort to fill
Sanford's campaign chest, the insiders say. is
the Watergate-inspired campaign financing
law which went into effect this year.
The law is troublesome because it limits
presidential campaign contributions by
individuals to $1,000. Thus, the large scale
funding Sanford received in 1 972, when Ann
Cannon Reynolds Forsyth. Winston-Salem
heiress to Cannon towel and Reynolds
tobacco fortunes, made loans to Sanford
totaling over $700,000, is a thing of the past.
The heiress forgave these loans this year.
As one Sanford supporter said. " whole
lot of people have used the phrase, A whole
new ball game,' with regard to campaign
financing this year, and it is that."
In the past, candidates have been able to
underwrite their fund raising efforts by
borrowing large sums of money during the
initial phases of their campaigns. With the.
new limits on contributions. Ithough, this
approach is no longer possible.
"This new campaign law jis a bear."
Henderson said. But while he said he regrets
the new difficulty in getting the money he
wants, he firmly added that he likes the new
law.
"I've suffered under the cesspool of
political contributions in the past." he said.
V
I
M .sv - - i
Democratic presidential hopeful Terry
Sanford needs money tor his campaign
"1 here's nothing for sale anymore."
Henderson said he not only welcomes th,
law because it will serve to stop the praci;c
of selling ambassadorial posts and ot !:
government jobs, but also because it makes
the smaller contributors more important toa.
candidate, and "brings the common man
back into the picture.' :
Besides the campaign funding lav,."
Sanford fund raisers see the post-Watergate
political atmosphere and the state ol th
economy as their major problems. I hev sa
these two factors have made it tough lor am
political candidate to raise monev these
days.
This view gets sympathetic nods Irom
political insiders in other areas ol the state
who are preparing for the various elections
of the next two years. In fact, these insiders
would probably agree with Henderson, who :
said. "If he (Sanford) were Franklin :.
Roosevelt, we'd be having the same
problem."
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Th Daily Tar Heel It published by the University of
North Carolina Madia Board; daily except Sunday,
xam periods, vacations, and summer sessions. The
following data ara to be the only Saturday issues:
Sept. 6, 20; Oct. 1, 8; Now. 11, 25.
Offices ara at the Student Union Building, University
of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514.
Telephone numbers: News, Sports 933-1 01 1 , 933
1012: Business, Circulation, Advertising 933
1163. i
Subscription rates: $25 per yean $12 50 per
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Second class postagt paid at U.S. Post Office in
Chapel Hid, N.C. 27514.
4
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to determine the Student Activities Fee and to
appropriate all revenue derived from the Student
Activities Fea (1.1.1.4 of the Student Constitution).
The Daily Tar Heel reserves the right to regulate the
typographical tone of all advertisements and to
revise or turn away copy it considers objectionable.
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payments tor any typographical errors or erroneous
Insertion unless notice Is given to the Business
Manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appaars, within (1) day of the receiving of the tear
sheets or subscription ot the paper. The Daily Tar
Heel will not be responsible for more than one
Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to
run several times. Notice for such correction must
ba given before the next Insertion.
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