North Carolina Newspapers

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The Daily Tar Heel Wednesday, February 5, 19863
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DTH Larry Childress
Ray Jones on his way to a preliminary victory
from page 1
election, saying that the 828-277 result
is invalid because non-seniors had voted
for senior class officers.
"We're appealing because there was
no way Jof checking if only juniors
voted," he said.
Miskavage said she and Courtney
also were appealing on the grounds that
The Phoenix did not include coverage
of their campaign in its election issue.
Lillie said the Elections Board would
look into the matter and decide about
a re-election within the next day or so.
Venable said, Tm rather frustrated
that our opponents are finding it
necessary to contest a race in which the
margin of victory was so decisive."
He said although the nature of the
election was disappointing, he and
Killough.werc ready to start working
for the senior class immediately.
Pavao received 3,444 votes for CAA
president. He said his first step in his
second term wuEfbe to put together
a new CAA cabinet.
Tin looking particularly for rising
sophomores and juniors w ho are intense
and creative and want a lot of leeway
and freedom in getting things done,"
he said.
Pavao said applications for CAA
positions would be available at the
Student Union desk on Monday.
"I'm looking forward to another year,
and I would like to thank especially this
year's staff," he said. "They put the CAA
back on the map." -
Staff' writers Rachel Orr and
Weaver contributed to this storv.
Kim
From staff reports
Students voted to make several
changes in the Student Constitution and
responded to opinion-poll referendums
on Tuesday's ballot.
All results are unofficial, pending
Elections Board verification today.
Students voted 2,518-934 to allow
student groups to petition the Campus
Governing Council for funds to lobby
on issues that "directly affect students"
at local, state and national levels.
The referendum amends the Student
Constitution, which prohibited the
allocation of funds for activities,
services or events of a political or
religious nature.
The bill is intended to allow lobbying
on issues such as tuition rates and the
drinking age, said Student Body Pres
ident Patricia Wallace, one of the bill's
authors. "We can't even get the funds
to call Raleigh or send buses to lobby
on an issue," Wallace said.
Bill Peaslee (Dist. 9) said the refer
endum would not have great effect,
because it would be nearly impossible
to get the required two-thirds majority
in the CGC. "Even on an issue like the
drinking age, there are different views,"
he said. "Christian groups would
oppose the issue even being talked
about in the CGC, making it very hard
to get that kind of a majority."
Students voted 2,560-1,130 in favor
of University divestment from compan
ies that do business in South Africa.
Dale McKinley, a member of the
UNC Anti-apartheid Support Group
which sponsored the referendum, said
he was pleased with the results.
1 "I think it shows that students who
voted as representatives of the whole
student body have overwhelming sup
port (for the referendum)," McKinley
said.
Group member Marguerite Arnold
said: "This will help us legitimize our
fight even further. . . . Apartheid is not
separate from (students') daily lives."
McKinley said the group would take
the referendum results to Chancellor
Christopher C. Fordham III and
petition him to contact the Board of
Trustees in support of the referendum.
Herman Bennett, another member of
the group, said student votes were not
necessarily an indication of what the
. administration will do.
"We have to move beyond operating
just under the Board of Trustees,"
Bennett said.
"By continuing to allow our invest
ments to remain in South Africa, we
are directly and indirectly assisting in
the oppression, exploitation and the
denial of human dignity."
The UNC Anti-apartheid Support
Group will continue educating people
about the issue and will raise money
for relief funds in South Africa, said
Mark Mays, a member of the group.
Students expressed overall dissatis
faction with the mandatory meal plan
proposals put forth by the Board of
Trustees and with the ARA food
service.
The results were 3,614-395 in oppo
sition to the $100 mandatory meal plan;
3,660-155 against the proposed $25 per
semester meal plan increases; and 2,757
775 against a proposed full room and
board plan if Chase Hall does not
operate at a profit.
Students also voted 3,21 1-479 against
renewing ARA's food service contract,
which expires in March.
Longest said the administration
could no longer ignore the complaints
of students as it did after a similar
referendum last year. "(After) two years
in a row, it is no longer a small group
of students," he said. "It's a student
voice,"
Students voted 1,982-1,236 in favor
of removing dormitory enhancement
funds from the University housing
department and placing them under
student control in the Student Activities
Fund Organization.
The referendum said that a $4
enhancement fee included in each dorm
resident's rent should go to SAFO so
it would not revert back to the housing
department if it were not spent.
The $4 had been divided, with $2.50
going to the housing department and
$1.50 going into a general enhancement
pool that is overseen by the Enhance
ment Committee, which includes RHA
members, an area director and a
consultant from business and
operations.
Because the enhancement fund is part
of students' dorm rent, the transfer
would have to be approved by the state,
housing officials have said.
The referendum to give , the CGC
speaker an annual stipend passed 1,498
1,403. Students defeated a referendum
1,185-1,482 that would "extend stipend
alteration policies" to the offices of
CGC speaker, student body treasurer
and attorney general.
Wallace said the vote meant that the
officers' stipends no longer could be
changed during their terms in office. She
said the only time the CGC would
consider changing an officer's stipend
would be if the budget was tight, and
they never cut anyone's this past term.
Students voted 1,970-1,346 to change
the name of the CGC to Student
Congress. Students also voted 1,982
1,236 to delete an obsolete clause in the
Student Constitution that said no more
than 55 percent of Elections Board
members could belong to one campus
party. Campus parties no longer exist.
Staff writers Jo Fleischer, Denise
Johnson, Teresa Kriegsman, Liz Saylor
and Kim Weaver contributed to this
story.
meirgeimcy ' 911 Mime cut out oS 'service
By KATHERINE WOOD
Staff Writer
Orange County residents were unable
to reach the county's 911 emergency
phone line Tuesday morning because
a construction crew severed two under
ground cables operating the line.
The service line, controlled by South
ern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Co.,
was cut by a road crew working on the
U.S. 40 extension, Chapel Hill Police
Planner Keith Lohmann said Tuesday.
The Chapel Hill Police Department,
the Carrboro Police Department and
the Orange County Sheriffs Depart
ment served as alternate bases to handle
emergency calls until the cables oper
ating the 91 1 number could be repaired.
"The road crew working on 1-40
accidentally cut two of our cables north
of Chapel Hill where the interstate will
cross N.C. 86," said Gene Upchurch,
a Southern Bell public relations repre
sentative in Raleigh. The cables were
cut at 7:45 a.m., he said.
Radio stations advised residents to
use their local police department
number as an alternative to 911 if
necessary.
Lohmann said the Chapel Hill Police
Department had received only a few
calls Tuesday morning because of the
disabled line.
Rerouting emergency calls, however,
did add an extra burden to local police
work, as did a traffic jam at the
intersection of Elliott Road and East
Franklin Street Monday evening.
The traffic congestion resulted from
repair efforts by an Orange Water and
Sewer Authority work crew, according
to police reports.
"The existing water line on Elliott
Road had been giving us problems for
the last couple of years," said John
Greene of OWASA's engineering
department. "The crew was connecting
a water-line replacement to the East
Franklin Street water line."
Greene said the crew had left only
one lane open on East Franklin Street
and needed help to direct traffic during
the 5 p.m. rush hour.
The water line is now operating at
full capacity, he said, and the only
remaining task is to repave the part of
East Franklin Street that the OWASA
crew shattered.
6
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1985-06
MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.
LECTURE
by
W. WILSON GO ODE
Mayor of Philadelphia
Thursday, February 6, 1986
Hill Hall 8:00 pm
Sponsored by the Chancellor's Committee
on Established Lectures
The Subway Steak
and Cheese Sandwich
Au Jus . . . Not All Grease!
Franklin Centre Willowcreek Shopping Center
Eastgate Shopping Center
Open: 10:30 am-2:00 am Sun.-Thurs.
10:30 am-3:00 am Fri. and Sat.
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Women's Basketball
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2:00 Carmichael Auditorium
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Each heart will be red in color
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Deadline: Wednesday,
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Enclose a check and mail or bring by the
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The DTH reserves the right to refuse or edit copy.
ACB3Einf
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Feb. 10-14, 17-21 SeoIdirG Only
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