North Carolina Newspapers

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'Copyright 1987 The Daily Tar Heel
Volume 95, Issue 40
onmer
By DAN MORRISON
Staff Writer
David Garrow, former assistant
professor of political science at
UNC. has received a Pulitzer Prize
in biographical writing for his book,
"Bearing the Cross: Martin Luther
King Jr. and the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference."
Garrow, who was appointed for
a three-year probationary term at
UNC in 1980, began research for the
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UNC's Gary Seivold flings a goal past Duke goalie Bill McCullough
Blue Devils hold off
By BOB YOUNG
Assistant Sports Editor
DURHAM It was a perfor
mance that almost made you wish
you were a Duke fan.
The Blue Devil lacrosse team,
playing its most inspired game of
the season (if not the decade),
upset North Carolina 10-9 on
Duke's Astroturf field to virtually
clinch itself a spot in the upcoming
NCAA tournament. UNC is now
ranked seventh in the nation as
Duke moves up to No. 10.
"This is just a great win for
Duke lacrosse," said coach Tony
Cullen, shivering from a post-
Developer
By REBECCA NESBIT
Staff Writer
: Construction could begin next
September on a $ 1 2 million commer
cial and residential project proposed
lor downtown Chapel Hill. Local
developer Guilford Waddell III
presented to the Chapel Hill Plan
ning Department some revised plans
for two sites, one called Franklin on
Franklin and another called West
court on Rosemary.
. Waddell proposed a similar pro
ject last year, which he called
Franklin Court. The Chapel Hill
Town Council did not approve the
Shake and
01 I" flit
UNC professor wins PmMteeir for
book in 1981 while working in the
Department of Political Science. But
Garrow's stay at UNC was cut short
in 1983 when University officials did
not accept his bid for tenure.
Garrow is now an associate pro
fessor of political science at the City
College of New York. He was not
available for comment Monday
afternoon.
Garrow's Pulitzer Prize-winning
biography was his third book on
game Giantesque ice bath. "Just
to beat a team as good as North
Carolina is a great honor for us."
In the first half, a steady rain
and two stingy defenses combined
to keep the goal total at four, as
Duke held a 3-1 lead. The Blue
Devils' Ken Lukes scored the
opening goal at the 8:56 mark, but
Pat Welsh answered with an
unassisted score 1 :40 later.
In the second quarter, Duke's
Jim Cabrera turned a Lukes' pass
into a goal past Barney Aburn to
regain the lead. Moments later, the
UNC's Scott Price, trying to clear
the ball o'ut of the Tar Heel end,
proposes.$12 million
project at that time, Waddell said,
because the project was still in the
money-raising stage and the plans
were not ready.
"When they look over it to
approve it in September, the plans
will be ready and in cue for all the
committees to look over," Waddell
said .
- He said the project has expanded
since last year because he has'
purchased more property for
development.
"It went from 90,000 square feet
to 130,000 square feet," Waddell
said.
shake the catsup
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
Tuesday, April 21,1987
K.ing and the civil rights movement.
The other two were "Protest at
Selma: Martin Luther King and the
Voting Rights Act of 1965" and "The
FBI and Martin Luther King Jr.:
From Solo to Memphis."
UNC's political science depart
ment voted . 10-9 in 1983 against
granting Garrow tenure at UNC, and
the decision was upheld by the UNC
System's Board of Governors.
The late James W. Prothro, then-
Special to the DTH Doug Smith
in the third quarter of the Blue Devils' defeat of the Tar Heels Saturday
UNC lacrosse, 10-9
passed the ball back to Aburn. But
Lukes picked off the pass right in
front of the Tar Heel goalie and
flipped it in for a 3-1 Duke lead.
At the beginning of the second
half, the rain subsided, the scoring
picked up and Duke's outstanding
goalie Bill McCullough showed a
moment of weakness. Twenty
seconds into the half,'UNC senior
attackman Rich Crawfold picked
off a , McCullough clearing pass
right in front of the goal and
dropped the ball over the goalie's
shoulder to bring the Tar Heels
to within one. j
"After I let that shot go by,"
I he project will be built in 3
phases: , r
The first phase will develop 30,000
square feet of retail and office space
in the former Southern Bell Building.
The West Franklin Preservation
Partners, a 72-member investment
group of which Waddell is a primary
partner, bought the property and
building from Southern Bell for $2
million last November
"Basically, this phase will be a
retail common . area.( Small bou
tiques, sportswear, uptown fashion,
that kind of stuff. Re!al.high class,
though," Waddell saidi
bottle; none will
Mm
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
chairman of the political science
department, denied Garrow's
request for reappointment in April
1983. "Garrow's scholarship was not
the quality or subject matter that had
been expected," Prothro said at the
time.
According to the Tenure Docu
ment, a faculty member can be
discharged only if it can be shown
that the member is unfit, incompe-
McCullough said, "I told myself
that I wasn't going to throw the
game away. There were too many
people depending on me."
But thirty seconds later, McCul
lough let down again as Chris Hein
scored on a Crawford assist to tie
the score at 3-3. UNC seemed to
be coming back.
"That's the thing you have to
worry about with North Carol
ina," Cullen said. "Just when you
think you have a comfortable lead,
they come back and score four or
five straight goals. We were able
See DUKE page 6
downtowincoiidlo-retail project
The second phase will develop the
Westcourt on Franklin residential
buildings, he said. They will consist
of 24 condos priced between
$150,000 and $175,000.
The third phase will develop a six
story residential building on the
property behind the West Franklin
Street Gulf Station. It will consist
of another 20 condos similar in cost
and size to the Westcourt on Frank
lin buildings.
If the council passes the project
this fall, it should be completed
within about two years, Waddell
said.
come, and then
o o
tent or neglecting duties.
Garrow spent several months
fighting the decision, appealing to
the dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences, a Faculty Hearing Com
mittee and the Board of Trustees.
His efforts failed, despite protest by
students who wanted the decision
overturned.
In 1983, in support of Garrow, two
UNC students presented Chancellor
Christopher Fordham and David
comM lose
7 nrneirniilbeffs
By JO FLEISCHER
Assistant University Editor
More than 25 percent of current
Student Congress representatives
may not be returning to represent
their districts in the fall, requiring
special elections and some new
committee assignments, congress
members said Monday.
Of the 26 representatives now on
the congress, four are graduating
seniors and at least three other
members may have to step down if
they move out of the districts they
' were elected in, according to the
congress members.
Congress representatives listed as
seniors in the student directory are:
Guy Lucas and Jim Wooten, both
of District 19, Phillip Parkerson
Ripley (Dist. 18) and Jim Duley
(Dist. 20).
Last year only two representatives
left the congress because they
graduated.
tadeets, Barents
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ffrastatied atoomt
college rejections
From Associated Press reports
A week after many colleges not
ified applicants, admissions officers
say frustrated parents have bom
barded their offices with telephone
calls demanding to know why their
children weren't accepted.
"One person offered to fly me and
a colleague to the island of our choice
for a vacation," said Anthony
Strickland, assistant director of
undergraduate admissions at UNC.
"That's the most extreme thing I've
heard."
Admissions officers said the
threats and bribes most of which
are more subtle than Strickland's
example don't do any good.
"I don't know what my price is,"
Strickland said, "but nobody's met
it yet."
Strickland and others said that
such parental behavior is sympto
matic of the high-stakes game the
college admissions process has
become.
He said the contractor is now
pricing the condos so that advertis
ments can begin running early this
summer.
"We will sell them as we build
them," he said.
Waddell said he expects three
types of people to buy the condos.
"About a third . will be empty
nesters between 45 and 60 years old.
These are the people who don't have
kids living with them anymore.
"About another a, third will be
businessmen who are in Chapel Hill
a lot, like members of the Board of
Trustees or UNC alumni.
a lot 7. Richard Armour
NewsSportsArts 962-0245
Business Advertising 962-1163
lb o ok
Moreau, then-dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences, with 2,500 sig
natures on a petition saying that
students saw research being emphas
ized at the expense of undergraduate
education at UNC.
In an interview with the Raleigh
News and Observer Saturday, Thad
Beyle, UNC professor of political
science, said of Garrow: "He was
more of a historian or journalist than
a political scientist."
Congress leaders are already
planning for fall elections to replace
the representatives who are leaving,
but they aren't pleased by it, said
Rob Friedman (Dist. 16), speaker of
the congress. "I'd rather work with
more than two-thirds of a congress,"
he said.
Friedman said he thought the high
turnover was brought on by this
year's controversial student fees
budgeting process.
Many of the congress' new
members ran to ensure that student
organizations like the Carolina Gay
and Lesbian Association received
funding during April's budget pro
cess, he said. "I have to think that
most of (the seniors) ran ... to get
CGLA funding."
Other student representatives may
not have known in advance that they
would be moving out of their
See CONGRESS page 7
For families with college-bound
seniors, these are tough times,
according to admissions officers and
high school guidance counselors.
"Certainly there's a lot of anxiety,
especially for students who applied
late or whose credentials are not as
competitive," said George Dixon,
associate director of undergraduate
admissions at North Carolina State
University.
Todd DeVries, a senior at Grims
ley High School in Greensboro,
could tell the news was bad when
he came home and found his mother
crying. He had been rejected from
his first-choice school. Northwestern
University in Evanston, 111.
"I was crushed," DeVries said. "1
wasn't expecting a rejection. "The 18-year-old
is in the top 5 percent of
his class, scored 1280 on the Scho
lastic Aptitude Test and attended
Governor's School. DeVries said he
See ADMISSIONS page 7
"The last third are people between
25 and 40 years of age and their
existing rank just increased. They
don't want to take care of their yards,
and they won't have to worry about
secure parking or having a parking
space. They will be able to walk to
pretty much everything on Franklin,
Rosemary or Church Streets," Wad
dell said.
Unlike the Rosemary Square
project, which has caused some
controversy among residents, this
project resolves many parking prob-
See WESTCOURT page 4
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y
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