North Carolina Newspapers

    Official
Labor L’nioa; a)
the A. F. of 1*
far
Charlotte labor Journal
YOU*
Truthful, Honest, Impartial
Endorsed by the N. C. State Federa
tion of Labor
AND DIXIE FARM NEWS
Endeavoring to Serve the Mi
VOL. IX—No. 41
AMTIITIMHINT »M Tits JOURNAL It *
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CHARLOTTE, N. C„ THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1940
12.00 Fee Ttar
LARGER BENEFITS FOR AMERICA’S
JOBLESS IS URGED - LESS THAN
$5 WEEFLY PAID BY FIVE STATES
WASHINGTON, D. C.—President
William Groan, of the American Fed*
oration of Labor, in a letter to a con
ference of State Unemployment Com
pensation officials at the Mayflower
Hotel here urged the enactment of
the McCormick Bill designed to pro
vide more equitable compensation for
the miljions of workers compelled to
serve time in the conscript army of
the jobless. The conference had re
quested a statement of the American
Federation of Labor’s position on the
McCormick Bill.
“The American Federation of La
bor urges the Executive Committee of
the Interstate Conference of Unem
ployment Compensation Agencies to
give its endorsement to H. R. 7762, a
bill introduced by Representative Mc
Cormick, of Massachusetts,’’ Mr.
Green told the conference.
“This bill would establish reason
able minimum benefit standards and
?rovide for a federal re-insurance
und to aid States whose own unem
ployment compensation funds were in
sufficient to pay benefits according to
these standards.
“It would also amend the Social Se
curity Act provisions on additional
credit allowance, making provision
for flat reductions to all employers in
States which provided benefit stand
ards better than the minimum, rather
than for differences in the credit al
lowances for individual employers.
“If unemployment compensatio
legislation is to provide any signifi
cant security for American workers,
the benefit provisions of unemploy
ment compensation laws must be
drastically revised. The present ben
efit provisions of State unemploy
ment compensation laws are unrea
sonably inadequate.
“From fifteen to thirty per cent of
the workers in insured employment
are declared ineligible because their
previous earnings have been inade
quate—in other words, because they
have already suffered extensive unem
ployment.
“The elimination of these workers
does not, however, serve as a basis for
the payment of adequate benefits to
those more regularly attached to in
dustry, for, in other respects, the
State systems are equally unsatisfac
tory.
“The weekly amounts are pitifully
low. In five States over forty-eight
per cent of the recipients receive
checks of les sthan $6.00.
“In most of the States for which
figures are available, a majority of
the recipients exhause their benefit
rights while still unemployed. The
waiting periods, in spite of reductions
in some States, are still unnecessar
ily long and place an undue burden
on the wage-earner’s small resources.
Finally, States have been adding in
creasingly severe disqualifications,
deiying all benefits to workers be
cause of only minor infractions.
Strike On Colored Housing Project
Amicably Settled On Wednesday
The strike on the Colored Housing project which started on
Monday morning was amicably settled Wednesday, an under
standing having been reached with the Goode Construction Com
pany and representatives of the Charlotte Building Trades Corn
ell. Those participating in the conferences leading to the settle
ment were: Vance Stamps, International representative of the
Carpenters and Joiners International; Thomas Clary, representa
tive of the Electrical Workers International; John Turaer, repre
sentative of the Hod Carriers and Common Laborers; CharlesDix
of the Plumbers and Steamfitters; Glenn E. Penland, of the N. C.
Department of Labor; Leon Wofford, assistant labor advisor of
the U. S. Housing Authority, and H. L. Kiser, business agent of
the Charlotte Building Trades Council.
hmwmimww
“If unemployment compensation is
to have any place in al ong-range so
lution of the unemployment problem,
. _nnw fn nHnnt benellt
luuon OI me r---- -
we must begin now to adopt benefit
,_i_i.. ...iii/iVi moot t np minimum
___ j-ww w .7
standards which meet the minimum
essentials of an unemployment insur
ance program.
“Such a program would not require
any additional taxes. Millions of dol
lars collected from the present unem
ployment compensation tax have been
oilintr up in huge reserves. At tne
present time, for *** ,c0’*nt.|3r.*
whole, over a billion and a half dollars
have already been set aside for tne
future. ,,
“In almost every state this repre
sents an increase beyond the reserves
_
Authentic
Reprinted from “PRINTERS INK”—
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far better advertising
medium than any ordinal
newspaper in comparisoi
with circulation. A Laboi
Paper, having 2,000 sul
scribers, is of more value^
to the business man who
advertises in it than the
ordinary newpaper with
12,000 ”
-PRINTER S INK,
... acknowledged author
ity on Advertising.
★ Advertisers can Profit
through use of the col
umns of The Labor
Journal weekly, for it
reaches the vast bulk of
Organized Labor who con
stitute a large portion of
Charlotte’s tremendous
buying power, which
amounts to over $5,000,
000annually.. Cash in on
this vast market, Mr. Ad
vertiser!
Charlotte |
Labor Journal
Telephone 3-3094 Charlotte, N. C.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF ORGANIZED LABOR IN CHARLOTTE
AND THIS SECTION OF NORTH CAROLINA
IN THE NINTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION
Central Labor Union held its regu
lar weekly meeting Wednesday night
in the Moose hall, presided over by
President J. A. Moore. J. A. Scoggins
was elected vice-president to fill an
existing vacancy. The Skating Area
Committee made a good report, show
ing progress in the campaign for
funds now being waged. Reports of
various locals showed membership
gains and practically everyone work
ing. Report was made of the settle
ment of the strike on the colored hous
ing project. The board of trustees re
port showed the financial condition of
Central body to be in excellent order,
and made a few recommendations
along other lines. The meeting was
one of the best attended in recent
months and a number of visitors were
present, a few ladies being among
the number.
t
Green Says A. F. L
Is Now Ready For
Peace Parley
WASHINGTON, Feb. 25.—Presi
dent William Green reiterated yester
day that the AFL was ready to re
sume peace negotiations with the
CIO.
In a letter to a group of clergymen
who had urged renewal of peace ne
gotiations, Green said the AFL Peace
Committee “stands ready to accept
and consider any proposals designed
to bring about a settlement of exist
ing difficulties.” His letter was ad
dressed to the Very Rev. Monsignor
John A. Ryan, director of the Depart
ment of Social Action of the National
Catholic Welfare Conference.
PRESERVE THE AMER
ICAN SVSTEM
“The people who are doing the
■oat to hasten the advent of com
munism and fascism are not the
agitators and radicals, but the
short-sighted employers who re
fuse to recognise organised labor.
When the employers of this coun
try frankly and openly remove all
obstacles to the organisation of
labor, and are willing to sit down
and talk over the problems of in
dustry with representatives of or
ganised labor, then we shall have
avoided Anally and definitely the
menace of communism and fascism.
And we shall have preoerrod the
American system, the system of de
mocracy in operation. The great
bulwark of democracy in the United
States is the organised labor move
ment, and it was never more im
portant than it is today.”—Rev.
J. W. R. Maguire.
It is estimated that insects destroy
one-tenth at everything man grows. <
SOUTHERN LABOR CONFERENCE CON
VENES SATURDAY MORN. ATLANTA;
GREEN SPEAK SUNDAY AFTERNOON
ATLANTA, Ga., Feb. 26.—When President Wm. Green arrives in At
lanta next Saturday moraine at 8:M o’clock, to attend the Southern Labor
Conference, he will be met at the Terminal Station by the executive officers
of State Federation of Labor from ten Southern states, and escorted to the
Municipal Auditorium where the Conference sessions will be held. In addition
to the executive boards of State Federation of Labor, President Dewey
L. Johnson, of the Atlanta Federation of Trades, and the on ar
rangements appointed by him will meet President Green.
The Conference will be called to order at 16 o’clock Saturday moraine,
by President Johnson, of the Atlanta Federation of Trades. The invocation
will be made by Dr. Louie D. Newton, pastor of Druid Hills Baptist church.
Addresses of Welcoaae will be delivered by Mayor William D. H.rtstteM,
for the city of Atlanta.
Governor E. D. Rivera, of the Southern Governors’ Conference, for the
South.
Charles B. Gramling, of Georgia Federation of Labor.
President Gramliag will then be called to the chair by President Jeha
sen to preride over the morning business session with addresses by George
L. Googe, Southern Representative of the American Federation of Labor,
on “Labor in th South to This Date”; John Coyne, president of the Building
and Construction Trades Department of the A. F. of L.
On Sunday Morning, A1 Flynn, President of the South Carolina State.
Federation of Labor will preside.
Address by Judge Joseph A. Padway, chief counsel for the A. F. of U
Hon. Robert Kamapeck, chairman of the Civil Service Committee of the
Heuse^fJohn P. Frey, president of the Metal Trades Department of the
On Sunday afternoon, with addresses by Frank P. Fenton, director of
organisation for the American Federation of Labor; with an address on
“Duty Faring Labor in the South,” by Wm. Green, president of the Amer
ican Federation of Labor.
COYNE’S ADDRESS IN ATLANTA
IS AWAITED WITH INTEREST
ATLANTA, Ga., Feb. 26.—John P.
Coyne, president of the Building
ana Construction Trades Department
of the American Federation of Labor,
will preside over the sessions of Die
Southern Labor Conference devoted to
the building trades problems.' The
Conference starts Saturday morning
and President Coyne will be heard on
the first day of the Conference. Due
to the important problems fracing the
Building and Construction Trades
Unions, Mr. Coyne’s address is await
ed with keen interest.
OFFICE WORKERS LOCAL UNION
TO ENTERTAIN PRES. WEIKLE
ATLANTA, Ga., Feb. 26.—Local
union No. 19903, American Federa
tion of Office Workers, will entertain
Mr. Frank Weikle, president of the
National organization, At a luncheon
in the Piedmont Hotel next Sunday at
12:30. President Weikle will be in
Atlanta attending the sessions of the
Southern Labor Conference and mem
bers of the local union have planned
the luncheon in his honor.
HEAD OF LEGAL DEPARTMENT
WILL BE HEARD AT MEETING
ATLANTA, Ga., Feb. 26.—Judge
Joseph A. Padway, chief counsel for
the American Federation of Labor,
will be heard at the Southern Labor
Conference starting here next Satur
day morning. Judge Padway’s ad
dress will be most interesting to the
delegates, visitors and the general
public, in view of the highly important
nature of legal matters in the Labor
movement. J
PRESIDENT FREY TO PRESIDE
OVER METAL TRADES SESSION
ATLANTA, Ga., Feb. 26.-^John P.
Frey, president of the Metal Trades
Department of the American Federa
tion of Labor, will preside over the
sessions of the Southern Labor Con
ference devoted to questions affecting
thet workers in the Metal trades. The
Conference, starting Saturday, March
2, and running through Sunday, will
be intensely interested in the metal
trades sessions and in the address to
be delivered by President Frey.
ATLANTA LABOB JOURNAL
WILL BE HOST TO VIS
ITING LABOR EDITORS
ATLANTA, Ga., Feb. 26.—The At
lanta Labor Journal, one of the oldest
labor papers in the South, is planning
a dinner for the labor paper editors
and publishers during the sessions of
the Southern Labor Conference start
ing here next Saturday morning. Je
rome Jones, editor of The Atlanta La
bor Journal, one of the best loved and
most widely known labor leaders of
the South, is expected to be present
and address the visiting labor paper
representatives.
SECRETARY ORNBURN TO HAVE
CHARGE OF “LABELL” SESSION
ATLANTA, Ga., Feb. 26.—L M.
Ornburn, secretary-treasurer of the
Union Labor Trades Department, will
preside over the session of the Sonth
ern Label Conference to be devoted to
promotion of the label. Union Labor’s
insignia of honor and honest dralings
Mr. Ornburn will then go to Birm
ingham where he will deliver an ad
dress over Station WAPI at 1:4S P.
M. Sunday, March 3. He will be guest
speaker at the Birmingham event of
the Birmingham Trades Council as a
feature of the regular Sunday after
noon radio program of the Binning,
ham Council.
CORNELIUS MAIDEN,
ORGANIZER, CHAIRMAN
OF THE COMMITTEE
ATLANTA, Ga., Feb. 26.—Cor
nelius Maiden, negro organizer for
the American Federation of Labor,
has been named chairman of the com
mittee on arrangements being made
for entertainment of the hundreds of
delegates of his race expected to at
tend the Southern Labor Conference.
Chairman Maiden is planning a
event for Saturday night, March 2.
There are many thousands of negro
members of the American Federation
of Labor Unions in the South.
“The Voice of God"
BY CHARLES STELZLE
God still speaks through specially
inspired people, although this message
is not accompanied by “signs and
wonders” as in the days of old. Usu
ally we do not recognize such people
nor heed their message until they
have been taken from us. Ordinarily,
crucifies them, and
the world first ____
long afterward, it “immortalizes”
them, and we erect statues to their
memory. And yet, what they have
collectively contributed becomes part
of the common fund of the people’s
wisdom, so that it may truthfully be
said that “the voice of the people is
the voice of God.”
The undiscerning hear in the peo
ple’s voice only a roar of discon
tent, or the mutterings of the mis
guided mass. But the statesmen in
every age who have accomplished the
things which have produced the
greatest good for all the people, got
much of their inspiration from the
masses because no group has a broad
er experience in the vital problems of
ever^r day life than the “common peo
Sometimes the people’s expression
of God’s will is crude. Sometimes it
comes as a shock to those who are
quite comfortable and have become
accustomed to things as they are, and
who, fully satisfied .with present con
ditions, are unwilling to be made un
comfortable by the perplexities and
problems of others. But rarely is an
appeal made in behalf of troubled or
perplexed people but what the com
mon people respond to such an appeal.
And in so doing they express the will
of God.
This has been proved in history,
and it is true today. It is being dem
onstrated in many parts of the world
where helpless men and women are
struggling aganst fearful odds—men
and women who are being driven from
their homes; robbed of their belong
ings; deprived of food and clothing:
scourged by brutal persecutors: and
many other tortures are inflicted
upon them which cannot even be men
tioned because of their horror.
American Labor has declared it
self regarding these atrocities. Many
workers in other countries are fight
ing the battles of those woh are being
oppressed. And the tyrants who are
subjecting the masses of the people
to these degradations are beginning
to fear for their future. The com
mon people—the men of uncommon
sense—to these the world owes a debt
of gratitude. If you would hoar the
vote* of God, hoop close to the people!
THEATRE DOORMEN, USHERS
AND CASHIERS ORGANIZE
HEMPSTEAD, N. T.—Theatre
cashiers, doormen and ushers in Nas
sau and Suffolk counties are on the
way tau realise the benefits accruing
from membership in a union affiliated
with the American Federation of La
bor. They are being thoroughly or
ganibed under the sponsorship of Hie
Movie Operators Local No. 640. A
barter covering service employes of
the theatre
Local 176-B,
Theatrical Stage Em;
waa recentiy .tauid to
International Alliance of
tage Employe
|ng Picture Machine Operators of the
loyes and Mov
United States and Canada. Local Mil
640, sponsoring the new local, is one
of the strongest in this area.
A historian declares that wh«Q
Alexander the Great plundered Per.
sepolis in Persia, it took 20,000 moUs
and $6,000 camels to carry the loot
    

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