North Carolina Newspapers

    The Charlotte Labor Journal
AND DIXIE FARM NEWS
M2 South CoUogo Stioot CSoc—A Floor)
PHONB MN4
•i** U» Act UMhoT m" ****** "*m '
W. M. WITTER_Editor and PubHohor
CLAUDE L ALBEA___I—rlati Editor
CHARLOTTE, N. C„ THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1940
Amarieanuaa ia an bo* al awalij, laytky to
ita inatitutiona and ideals, eagerness to defend it agatnst all
enemies, undivided allegiance to the flag, and a desire to os
cure the blessings of librty to ourselves and posterity.
AN EASTER MESSAGE
GOD AND YOU
BY CHARLES STELZLE
Just as God swung in the stars in the heavens when the
world was young so that men might not stumble in the dark, sc
in these latter days He is sending forth illumined souls so that
they may light the way for troubled, tempest-tossed travelers on
the highways of life.
They are God’s prophets and interpreters. A Religion that
is growing needs interpreters. A Religion that is static needs only
scribes. What Religion has to say to the world today, can also
feel the needs of tomorrow. , For Religion that is to satisfy the
needs of men in an expanding world must not only deal with the
problems of today — it must be prophetic of the future.
No where is it promised that in life we shall be free from
all cares and burdens. These are sure to come in the day-by-day
journey along the pilgrim road. But God plainly offers a chal
lenge to men. He wants men who have been made perfect through
suffering. The whole world is crying out for the leadership of
men who are mad of martyr-stuff, but who do not speak of their
martyrdom. It seeks men who are ready to tread the “wine
press of sorrow,’’ but who* will do so with joy in their hearts. It
is because of such that “God goes marching on.”
, Man is incurably religious. His religious spirit is accounted
for by the fact that he finds himself in a world governed by order
ly forces. All about him are signs of unity and purpose, reveal
ing Will and Mind that are infinite. All primitive peoples have
sought an explanation of this mystery, and their finite interpre
tation became the basis of their worship. ' The answer is still
being sought in other fields, but no more satisfactory solution
has been found than that given by Religion—that back of the arm
of Omnipotence is theg reat heart of a loving Father.
mm f mimmn
*»+♦♦♦♦?*»♦•♦♦»+•••»»♦»•••••+•••»•••#•••••»••••+•♦<
THY NEIGHBOR
Life is made up, not of great sacrifices or duties, but of little things,
in which smiles and kindnesses and small obligations, given habitually,
are what win and preserve the heart and secure comfort.—Sir Humph
rey Davy, English chemist, 1778-1829.
Who is thy neighbor? He whom thou has power to aid or
bless;
Whose aching heart or burning brow thy soothing hand
may press.
Thy neighbor? 'Tis the fainting poor whose eye with want
is dim.
Oh, enter thou his humble door, with aid and peace for him.
)
Thy neighbor? He who drinks the cup when sorrow drowns
the brim;
With words of high sustaining hope, go thou and comfort
him.
Thy neighbor? ’Tis the weary slave, fettered in mind and
limb;
He hath no hope this side the grave; go thou and ransom
him.
Thy neighbor? Pass no mourner by; perhaps thou canst
redeem
A breaking heart from misery; go share thy lot with him.
—Author Unidentified.
The skull of an infant contains more
bones than the skull of an adult.
SOME OF THE THINGS
WE LEND MONEY ON
All Business Strictly Confi
dent'''. When In Need of
Money We Never Fail
You
Reliable Loan Co.
121 E. TRADE ST.
(Next to Balk’s)
So# Us for BargaiM is Diamonds,
Watches, Jewelry, Clothing, ate.
PRESERVE THE AMER
ICAN SYSTEM
“The people who are doing the
aoet to hasten the advent of eoa
nnnism and faadaa are not the
agitators and radicals, but the
short-sighted eaployera who re
fuse to recognise organised labor.
When the eaplojrera of this coun
try frankly and openly reaove all
obstacles to the organisation of
labor, and are willing to ait down
and talk over the probleas of in
dustry with representatives of or
ganised labor, then we shall have
avoided finally and definitely the
aenace of coaaunisa and fasdsa.
And we shall have preserved the
American systea, the systea of de
mocracy in operation. The great
bulwark of denocracy in the United
States is the organised labor aove
aent, and it was never aore ia
portant than it is today."—Rev.
J. W. R. Maguire.
LABOR PRESS
The St. Louis Labor Tribune, editorially carried the following
lead editorial, March 9, which is being reproduced in its entirety,
without conunent:
SOME QUESTIONS FOR LABOR OFFICIALS ON
THE LABOR PRESS
Samuel Goa perm, the George Washington of the Labor Move
aent on numerous occasions proclaimed his faith in the Labor Press
and strongly emphasised the necessity of giving it aural and
financial subscription support. He acknowledged that such a preso
is essential to the very existence of the Labor Movement.
No one in the Moveaent has ever had the teaerity to challenge
this proposition of Saaael Goapers. The preaise being true, namely
that the support of your Labor Press is essential, it follows as the
day follows that you should give such support to your labor paper.
It is the duty of every union member to keep informed upon
autters pertaining to Organised Labor in his community and the
nation. The only way this can be done is to be a subscriber and
learn the facts through habitual reading of you labor weekly. It is
not enough to keep in touch with the activities of you own national
or international union because Labor can only prosper through
active unity and co-operation among all its branches.
There is no excuse whatever for any official of a labor union not
subscribing to a labor newspaper in his community. He should be a
paid subscriber. He should pay for his labor paper jut as he pays
for his daily newspaper, and not expect it gratuitously.
We direct these few pertinent queries to every Labor official in
this way: Are you a paid subscriber to the local Labor Pressr If not,
why aren't you? If you ue a subscriber, why do you not eneouage
your rank and filers to subscribe and like yourself be kept informed
of activities which affect the general and particular interests of
everyone in the Labor Movement? The correct answer to these
queries is the proof of your sincerity and the measure of your in
telligence in the value of a constructive Labor Organ to the Move
r CHARLOTTE |
FrL—Sat^J
THpvUfc* /y A 7ouc4do%v>t
me
... n in Ail-Amencai
Uff Show if the Ceitiry!
PATRON]
VA
OUR ADVERTISERS
I DeWitt’s Specials For Easter
, '34 Chevrolet
Coach .
’35 Plymouth
Sedan ..
'36 Plymouth
Sedan J.
•36 Chrysler
Sedan .!.
'36 DeSoto
Sedan .
*36 Chevrolet
Coach .
<116.
<166
<296
<296
<296
<326
'37 DeSoto Touring
ckara
"6"
dsmobile “6"
Soto Touring
Soto Touring
mu
$446
$460
$486
S646
$896
DeWitt Motor Co., Inc.
428 West Trade Dial 5111*
iou can t ao wimout a pair or dadaie
Oxfords, thoy'ro so downright comfort
able, whether you walk, work or play
In them. Extra ease underfoot with
inney's "Sport Rubber” sales and heels.
Sint 3*4-9
6er
YOtttt PAIR
TOMORROW.
KINNEYS
Martini Dept. >Store
RELIABLE MERCHANDISE ALWAYS
AT LOW PRICES,
OUR NEW STORE NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS WHH A COMPLETE 8TOCK OF SPRING AND SUMMER
]
700,000 Workers
On WfA Face
A “Dismissal
99
SJ^Y,—In order to keep
““ Wort* Projects Administration
within the Congressional appropria
tion of 11,477,000,000 for thTcu&ent
fiscal year approximately 700,000 per
40 ** dl8lni»»e<i from
the WPA by June 30, Howard O.
Hunter, deputy WPA commissioner,
announced. The WPA rolls now total
2r2?nhf?°-' wil1 be*in with
200,000 in Ajril, Mr. Hunter said.
Four tons of worn-out paper money
mmfretUn>e<,jt0 the Treasury depart
ment evfry day.
Subscribe for the Journal
r
Capital Newsmen
Ridicule Lewis At
Annual Dinner
WASHINGTON. D. C. — The
shrewdest political observers in the
nation’s capital, gathered together at
the annual dinner of the White House
Correspondents’ association to Presi
dent Roosevelt, ridiculed John L.
Lewis’ pretensions to political power.
In a newsreel shown to the diners
the various presidential possibilities
were depicted. One of the biggest
laughs came when Senator ^heeler
of Montana was pictured kissing ba
bies to get votes and then receiving
the “kiss of death” from the leader
of the CIO.
Out of a world population of ap
proximately two billion, there are only
about fifteen million Jews.
j Give Variety to Your Lenten Menus
ToAvoid Monotony In Lenten Mooli Try New Vegetable Combination,—Canned
•ai with Any of Hit Following: Com, Colory, Tomatoes, Cauliflower or Parsnip*.
•VARIETY is the magic word in
Lenten menus; And it’s not so difficult
to attain, either. Serve fish, of course.
There is nothing quite like this food
prepared in'any one of countless tempt
ing ways—broiled, creamed, augratm,
baked, en casserole, fried in deep fat.
Fish lends itself to more
appetising
methods of preparation than perhaps
any other food.
Then look to the vegetable dishes
that will go with your main course,
for in these “sides” very often rests the
entire success of a meaL Always be
sure that the vegetable you ehooee is
one whose flavor will blend well with
the other dishes.
That's why canned peas remain
the outstanding favorite in Lenten
menus. They are obtainable in every
sise and flavor, from the tiny early June
variety to the giant sise swest wrinkled
variety. But regardless of the variety
you prefer,'they are all alike in their
fresh-picked garden flavor, revealing
so well the great speed with which they
are taken from the vine and canned.
The popularity of carrots and pea3
attests to the delicious way the mild,
universally-liked flavor and attractive
green oolor combine with other vege
tables. Other combinations, not so
well-known, but equally delicious, are
easily prepared by mixing peas with
celery—creamed or buttered; whole
kernel eom, cauliflower, tomatoes,
mushrooms, rutabaga, or parsnips. And
try adding a little chopped onion next
time you serve carrots and peas. The
unusual delicious flavor of these easy
combinations will brighten those Lent
en meals.
Heat the pfaas in their own juice, and
.And if you
find that you arc not going to u*e the
juice for the recipe, don’t throw it
away. Used- in soups it makes an ex
tremely healthful lunch for the next
dn.
Try a few of the suggested vegetables
with canned peas. Peas have never
been so fresh and delicious as this year
and you'll find yourself using Umib
after the Lenten season is over.
And now for your first Lenten menu
suggestion— broiled lake trout A per
fect Lenten meal that'll make the
of the house remember outdoor vaca
tions, a roaring fire, and trout slowly
broiling over the flames. Watch it perk
up weary appetites!
Broiled Lake Trout With Buttered Canned
Peat and Cauliflower
Hub the boned trout well with melted butter
or oil mad lemon juk* end let stand ten min
ster before broiling. Broil akin side last and
only until slightly crisp. Most of tbs broiling
an be done from the made.
Heat the canned pens in their own Juiee to
■erring temperature: season to taste with but
ter, salt and pepper—then just before serving
combine with the desired portions of cauliflower
pre-cooked sac' seasoned and cut into small
lowerleta.
A one-dish meal that’s a little differ
ent. Its unusual tastiness will speak
for itself.
deviled Sea Food With Buttered Canned
Peas and Com
Combine equal portions of tuna flab, pad
talinon or crabmeat with a little celery and
treen pepper. Then place in buttered thebe or
ndividual ramkins; add a dot of butter and I
,ba. of cream to each service. Bake in a mod
erate oven for SO minutes Serve at onoa.
Combine equa portions o. whole kernel earn
ind canned peas, season to taste with butter,
islt, pepper. Heat to serving temperature and
nrva with the sea food, accompanied by
iroiled tomato halves. The variety of colors in
his manu is most plaadng. as waif aa dal in ions
n lover sootrsata
Bankrupt Sale
AT GIVE-AWAY PRICES
All HATS Regardless of
Former Prices -
SWEATERS .
35c SHORTS
and SHIRTS ..
55c to 51.00 TIES
5 for $1..
$1.65 - $1.95 Dress
SHIRTS .
$1.49
49c
17c
21c
88c
NEWBERG’S MEN’S SHOP
115 WEST TRADE STREET
ANDREWS
MUSIC CO.
-WMITHINC MUSICAL”
SSI H. Try mi SL
>atronize Journal Advertisers
VARIETY OF
FOODS
VtMteblss. a**
serts. breeds — you’ll find not
tun or three, but msny to
choose from
V»«W^
GAKTCRU
F. C ROBERTS
OPTOMETRIST
114)4 «. Ttjmi
N.C
MU
For Constipation
Vijror and Pop!
CHEW
PEP-O-LAX
Whan Bayias Aaplria ---
C. B. ASPIRIN
PATRONIZE JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view