North Carolina Newspapers

    The Charlotte Labor Journal
_ AND Dim FARM NRWS
* UN.
U. MU. M *■
*»• ft
W* M. WETTER.
CLAUDS JL ALMA.
CHARLOTTE, N. C, THURSDAY, MARCH 28,1840
PEOPLE CAN'T EAT EPIGRAMS
(KtpriaM froa Labor, Washington, D. C.)
|ynig( of the position he occupies in American life
—■ll# has von soapy exalted :positions and yet refused to crook
hip knee to any party or group — Mayor LaGuardia’s utterances
carry great weight.
“f*u cannot feed r~w>i~r~ epigrams, no matter bow snappy
they grp"
“If a man is a candidate, he seemingly canont be specific.
I have yet to hoar the candidates for presidential nominations
ing except ‘we must reduce expenditures,’ ‘we must bal
budget, but we want to continue relief and help the
fanner."
It is true have been feeding us epigrams for a
good many generations. No voter likes such inadequate mental
but he will continue to receive it until he rebels;
and 1040 is as good a time as any to make a start.
A good example of this epigram business was given by Sena
ter Report Taft just a short time ago when he declared that
“relief can’t be run from marble palaces in Washington.
Of course, relief has never been run from marble palaces.
When Harry Hopkins was doing his biggest job he occupied very
modest quarters. Senator Taft knows that. Then why did he
tni^ about marble palaces? Because he wished to prejudice the
voter# against the present relief setup and thus pave the way for
returning relief to the states. This scheme is dear to the hearts
of the U. S. Chamber of Commerce and other reactionary interests,
but it means more misery for the idle.
UNEMPLOYED
Despondent, tired, with weary feet,
With hope that's now grown dim,
The unemployed man walks the
Hns'cod forgotten hiint
He walks from rosy 4»wn’y first
light,
He walks until the stars come up
And atill “no work today."
“01 God for food with which to sup
A room in which to stay I"
So slowly now he stumbles on
With aching, faltering feet,
Until his strength completely gone,
He falls—there on the street.
Then to a hospital they bear
The prostrate form away;
Poor bit of human waste! His care;
A debt we all moat Day.
0 world! Why don't you give him
work
And wages that are fair?
Try as you will—you cannot shirk,
His burdens you must share.
—PEARL RIDLEY GRUBBS,
in Atlanta Constitution.
PATRONIZE THOSE
WHO ADVERTISE IN
THE JOURNAL
SOME OF TOE THINGS
WE LEND MONEY ON
mUHL When
Moogjr W« N<
Til
Strictly Confl.
i te Nood of
FU1
Reliable Loan Co.
1*1 B. TRADE «T.
(Nert to Baft's)
mm_
Watches,
Powderly’s Widow
v Passes Away At
Age Of 84 Years
Mrs. Emma Powderly died in Wash
ington this week, aged 84. She was
the widow of T. V. Powderly who, 60
or 60 years ago, led the Knights of
Labor, and was the outstanding labor
leader of America.
After the K. of L. went to pieces,
Powderly became commissioner of
immigration and held other positions
in the U .S. Labor Department of
Labor.'
RECIPROCATE
We are helped by helping others,
Joy we give and Joy we get.
Seeing others as our brothers
Is life’s safest, surest “bet.”
If wo give whst folks are needing
It will pay as in the end,
And wo just can’t help succeeding
In the game of Life, sty friend!
Cheerfulness is always catching.
Certain cure for «rry rile!
Happiness is always hatching
In sunshine of a smile!
Banish gloom, by being cheerful.
Blase the trail, and set the pace
And you’ll see expressions drearfui
Swiftly fade from ev’ry face.
Life ^gives back just what we give
Give it smiles—and smiles we
xcf *
If we learn this rule, sad live it.
We will seldom know regret.
Give u cheerful word—we’U reap it.
It will come back multiplied
And will linger—we can keep it
In our treasure-chest, inside.
Join a Union! Pull together!
It’s the spirit that will win.
If the gales of life we’d weather
We must “buck” them with a
Help* yourself, by helping others,
Grab an oar and join the crew!
Pull together with your brothers
And they’ll win the race for you.
—By Peter Kuknst, Financial Sec
retary, Trade and Labor Federa
tion of New Brunswick, N. J.
The United States has diplomatic
representatives in over fifty foreign
nations. Salaries range from $2,500
to $10,000.
The first streamline train was
placed in service in 1984. There are
now 88 highspeed light-weight trains
in operation on 18 railroads.
N. Y. Restaurants
Minium Pay Is
Fixed By State
NEW YORg» N. Y,—An order set
ting 20 and SO cents an boar as min
imum wages f«r a week of 24 to 48
hoars, affecting 50,000 women and
aate minors empjftycdi© regteunnts
in New York State, wfllgo into effect
fta.vaatrBr*iS-Sa
Commissioner.
The specified minimum wages are
in addition to tips, meals and uni
forms. Waitresses are to get no less
than 20 cents an hour, with employes
having no opportunity for tips getting
a minimum of 30 cents.
Sabaeribe for the Journal
MMMMMSMMWMMM
CHEAPER AUTO PLATES
SATURDAY, MARCH 30TH
Cut rates on automobile license
plates will go in effect Saturday,
March 30. The cut will result in all
tags selling at three-fourths the an
nual prices.
The Empire State building in New
York City everts less pressure per
square inch on the ground than a
woman’s French heel.
PATRONIZE THOSE
WHO ADVERTISE IN
THE JOURNAL
PHIICO
Transitone
Model
TH4
CASH
5-tube, AC-DC Superheterodyne —
all tubes work, no ballast tube.
New, improved speaker gives deep,
rich tone, more volume. Powerful,
sensitive, selective. Built-in aerial.
No ground needed. Smart, brown
Bakelite cabinet
Just the right size for the
kitchen, with stainless porce
lain top and large utensil
drawer. A real “buy** at this
low price.
OPEN
AN
ACCOUNT
t
_ For • Truly Prnfoct "Flavor Harmon/' Sotvo Ham and Egg Timbal#*
Whb BuNorod Cannod P#o*^»Tbo/*o Downright D#lielow. g
French oooke have lone bean noted
tor their ability to prepare tempting
end delicious creations from left-overs.
Perhaps we can even give them the
credit for originating two of the most
popular ways in which leftovers are
used today, namely — Timbales and
Croquettes, since both of ‘
word for Icettledrum,”
the mold in which this
the shape of
‘i Is usually
__ __an alike in
that they both offer a splendid two for
small quantities of left-over foods,
They an unlike otherwise, sines the
base for a timbale is eostard and for
moat croquettes it Is a thick white
sauce. Tbs method of cooking r *
also varies; croquettes an fried in
fat and timbales are baked at a very
Left-over meats and veartabln often
.main left-oven until it is too late to
eat them, or until they, have, been soo
the heading of a
Not condemning the snack in any way,
for refrigemtor raiders mast have
something for their efforts, but" * ‘
snd food bills
out of the red if careful considesatioo
is given to the possibilities of asmg
left oven in main coones for suppers,
luncheons, and even dinners to follow
in a day or so. 1
A cupful of left-over ham, beef^or
much of a contribution toward a
dish to serve 4 or 0
does a cupful of
a foundation. They make attractive
and Ducticil mein
Since timbales and eroquettas have a
definite place in economy menus it
Neither
«e or po
croquette
will also bo well to consider what other
foods ora moat appropriate to serve
with them. If left-over meats, or meat
extenders, are the base, then it is pos
sible to consider almost any one of the
vast number of canned vegetables, be
came they may definitely be considered
as budget savers. They make it pos
sible for the homemaker to buy out of
season foods at a reasonable mice and
to buy in quantity when the grocer
offersthem at a bargain.
In the Add of canned vegetables,
homemakers will naturally include
croquettes. They are extra thrifty, too,
and are available in a style for every
menu. Their dietetic value should not
be overlooked because they an a good
source of vitamins A, B and C, and
contribute good amounts of minerals
suehas phosphorus and iron. Because
canned peas are packed quickly where
thsygrow,they have thaO‘just picked”
flavor. Then remember their many
advantages aod use them often, and as
Socially when taking oount of the poe
Kffltin they offer with timbales and
is. Serve them buttered,
or In a<
Two pigs under a fence would
ly 20 per cent more noise than one
£
It takes 27 singers to sing twice as
loud as one singer. A trio is but one
third louder than a soloist
Martin’s Dept. >Store
RELlABLEtMERCHANDISE ALWAYS
AT LOW PRICES
OUR NRW 01ORR HOW 0WW FOB
I
Wtm A COMPLETE STOCK OP SPRING AND SUMMER
iTATEMEVr^TonjRSnT^^"
J. WARREN MADDEN
Chairman Madden, of the National
>abor Board, stated last Saturday
hat he had been advised that it was
eing said that the Board was lobby
ing in. connection with its appropria
tion pending before the House of
Representatives. Mr. Madden cate
gorically denied that the Board was
lobbying in connection with the appro
priation and said that no employe of
the Board was doing so, so far as the
Board could learn.
FOR SAFETY AND COMFORT RIDE
GREYHOUND
*.// tiei
Bankrupt Sale
AT GIVE-AWAY PRICES
All HATS Regardless of
Former Prices ---
SWEATERS —-....
35c SHORTS
•nd SHIRTS .-—— -
55c to $1.M TIES
5 for $1 .4.-.
$1.65 - $1.95 Dress
SHIRTS .
$1.49
49c
17c
21c
88c
NEWBERG’S MEN’S SHOP
115 WEST TRADE STREET
ANDREW?
MUSIC CO.
-irnYTHING MUSICAL”
1*1 IT. Wjtf St
Patronize Journal Advertise**
ginnrri~ri-i~'~T* ■
VARIETY OF
FOODS
VisiiUM. meats. salaA. m*
Mrta. breads — jroull Ibid not
two ur tbrco. bat many to
choose from
V«*W/
CAKTHU
4
F. G ROBERTS
OPTOMETRIST
114)4 I. Trjw aLftaM MH4
M. C
—
For Constipatka
Vigor and Popl
CHEW
PEP-0 LAX
Win
C B. A8PDUM
this Sija
^ this Santa
PATRONIZE JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
    

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