North Carolina Newspapers

    TUOWLT RBALLT PfDEPENDtWT WEEKLY to Mtckknktt CoUtr
m Wookfr ito fhdlin
tho LARGE8T BUYING POWER to OmrttU
omctei
Labor laioa;
ih« A. F, rf L
Cnmi
far
Che Charlotte labor Journal
Mato YOU*
_ Truthful, Honest, Impartial
by tfc* N. C. Stata FiUtra
tiaa af Labor
AND D1
FARM NEWS
Endeavoring to Serve the Masses
VOL. IX—No. 47
Atviatiaumt im Tm« Jwnai t* a
CHARLOTTE. N. C, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1940
92.00 Par Toor
SKATING AREA PROJECT POSTPONED;
AWAITS SELECTION OF LOCATIONS;
REGULAR OFFICE COM. REPORTS
The meeting was called to order by President Moore,
with Brother W. S. Campbell saying the invocation, and
the minutes of the previous meeting were read and
approved.
Various committees reported. The Skating Areas
Committee reported still being delayed waiting for a
School Board decision for location of two Skating Areas.
The Library opening was discussed by the Civic and Pub
lic Relations committee, and a hands off policy was de
ckled upon, as the Charlotte Civic Council will run the
Library Opening Election Campaign.
The Special committee re-opening of a regular office
for organization work made a report, with the minutes
of their actions being read, and receipt of an answer by
Paul J. Aymon to the letter of our President stating it
was his thought to take same up at the State A. F. of L.
Convenion. A wire was sent asking that immediate ac
tion be taken after receipt of the letter by the Committee.
The Secretary stated that he had not been informed of
the time or place of the meeting held by this special
committee. Thereport of the committee was accepted by
the delegates present.
A motion passed to cancel all past per capita tax of
the Electrical Workers Local.
Another large local in Charlotte has voted to af
filiate with the Charlotte Central Labor Union, and cre
dentials will be presented in the very near future. An
other local came in for a round of applause, this time the
Printing Pressmen’s local which has doubled in size. The
International Representative, Brother Wilson, of the
Pressmen’s union, made one of the finest addresses made *
on the floor of the Central Body in a long time.
After much discussion pro and con, the meeting
adjourned.
WM. S. GREENE, Sec.
Charlotte Central Labor Union.
SCARS OF HATRED
S -
BY CHARLES STELZLE
(Mirtrr htWMtiottl Association of Machinists)
It to the fashion in mom families
to eater the ex a aoa or daugh
tor for admioaion to their favorite col
child shall receive the “right” hind ol
an education. And yet, they forgel
that even during its earliest years
there may be stamped upon that child’*
heart and mind ceratin prejudice;
and hatreds which no college in the
land can eradicate.
Where does this spirit of class
hatred have its source? Most of us
imagine that it is due altogether to
the propaganda of misguided leaders
The fact is, such leaders usually take
advantage of prejudice which already
exists. They simply build upon it and
intensify it. Therefore we need to
go back to original sources. Ordinar
ily the damage is done in the home.
And here’s how it usually happens, so
/far as the child is concerned. The
family is gathered about the supper
table, and father or mother makes an
unjust or cruel charge against some
one they have encountered during the
day, or, they repeat as a fact some
thing they read in a prejudiced jour
nal or pamphlet concerning a partic
ular race or religion, or the alleged
act of a representative of organized
labor.
The tirade closes with an unfair
characterization of the person discuss
ed and ends with the remark: “That’s
just like a-,’’ whatever
the nationality, or the religion, or the
position of the person may be. And
hereby a whole race, or form of re
ligion, or the position of the peraon
may be. And thereby aw hole race,
or form of religion, or movement is
iamried.'Tt-Inax seme Kke an unim
portant matter to the parent, ^ut the
;hild seated next to father or mother
istens in wonder and amazfinent,
ind, having absolute confidence in its
parent, it believes everything that was
mid must be true.
Thus the seed of hatred is planted.
It grows in the child’s mind and be
comes a festering, corrosive sore
which affects all its thinking, distort
ng all its judgments. The result is
hat more harm has been done to the
:hild than to the person or persons
who were thoughtlessly, ignorantly, or
spitefully misrepresented or slan
dered.
Need it be said that parents should
not encourage—especially in their own
homes—that which is unnatural in
children, and which is one of the great
est blights on mankind today? In
these times when hatred is so ram
pant, causing untold suffering to in
dividuals and to nations, the parents
of American children can render no
greater service in building up the
spirit of Brotherhood and Democracy
throughout the world than by showing
their children how hatred is responsi
ble for the great tragedies of today,
as well as being the greatest menace
to the world of tomorrow.
“Whom the Russians would destroy,
they first make mad.”—-8talin.
WIWMVWMSM
THE MARCH OF LABOR
nit STRUCK or tmi taiiorcssis
MCW YORK CITY-IMS
/ ^ ^ANDREW
lnuAfltaAi
1808'1875 IT PRES. OF US.
STARTED WORK AT IEMCH W
TAILOR SHOD. WON HIS FIRST
POLITICAL CAMPAIGN ASA
CANDIDATE ON A WORKINO
HEN'S TICKET.
^MtUM il
(MMUH*...
PRES. WM. GREEN’S FINAL ARTICLE i
IN REPLY TO PEGLER’S TIRADE
AGAINST THE AM. FED. OF LABOR,
Westbrook Pegler’s charge that the
American Federation of Labor con
dones and protects dishonest unionism
is a deliberate falsehood.
The American Federation of Labor
denounces the miserable few who man
age to worm their way into the labor
movement for dishonest purposes and
personal advancement. We .call upon
our affiliated unions to root out and
expel any individual found guilty of
a betrayal of trust. In addition we
call upon the constituted public au
thorities of our cities, States and na
tion to enforce the law that applies to
all our citizens without fear or favor.
The American Federation of Labor
WHO'S WHO
IN UNIONS
I EDWARD J. VOLZ
_J J. Vol*. President of the
International Photo
____Engraver*’
Union of North America, became
active in the Labor Union now
vent of New York City in 1*04.
He waa President of Us Local
Union for IS years when he was
selected to lead the International
organisation In 1989, succeeding
Mr. Matthew Woll, who became
the President of the Union Labor
Life Insurance Company.
Mr, Vols has assisted in building
one ot the strongest Labor Unions
in America. Its member* are
among those receiving the highest
annual wage and have established
exceptional employment standards.
Although it is not a large Union
in numbers, it has had a great
influence on the American Labor
movement generally.
Each member of the Photo
Insurance Company in the amount
of S1.000. Unemployment benefits
Company in th
__ UnempWymen
provided over a 10-yac.
have averaged more than II
1,000
annually. The significance of the
latter fcet is better realised wh«m
one considers then are only 10,600
members of the Photo-Engravers
Union.
Mr. Vols has been a delegate to
American Federation of Labor in
ventions since 1928, He has taken
an active part in the campaign for
Union Labels, Shop Cards, and
Service Buttons. Through his able
'is enrolled
leadership, he has —-- -
eent of the highly skilled artisans
95 per
employed as photo-engravers and
processor* of kindred methods of
printing plates, including, relief,
intaglio, ]
He attend
Union
and
_____ pwvca, Miviuums
ntaglio, planographic* and offset*
nds all conventions of the
>n Label Trades Department
is also a member of the Board
Jovernorf of the International
of Govern
Allied Prin
He is wld
respected
movement.
His address
Ti-des Association.
known and highly
t’e Trade Union
__ Is; Mr, Edward J
Vols President, International
Photo-Engravers’ Union of North
America, 892 Madison Avenue,
Room 1110, New York, N. Y,
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS’ LABEL
The International Photo-Engrav
ers Union of No th America
adopted its Union Label in 1907.
This insignia is stamped on p®
Union-made cut or wigraving.
Any printed matter on which
is displayed the Allied Printing
' ts Association Union Label
Trades____- ...
gives assurance that the engraving
work was done by members «f
the International Photo-Engravers
Union, because it is affiliated with
this printing trades council.
For further information
ing Union Labels, Shop Csrd^
Service Buttons, write Mr. L M.
Orabum, Se<y etary-Treasurer,
Union Label Trades Department,
American Federation of "
Building, Washington, D. C.
ia a union of trad* unions. It is com
posed of the following groups of or
ganisations:
106 National and International
Unions, which have 88,744 local
unions.
49 State Federations of Labor (in
cluding Puerto Bfco).
806 City Central bodies.
1,568 directly affiliated local trade
knd Federal Labor Unions.
4 Departments, which have 942 lo
cal councils.
The national and international
unions, many of which antedate the
American Federation of Labor itself,
[hold charters of affiliation with
American Federation of Labor which
give them full autonomy and full au
: thority to govern their own, internal
! affairs. Their relation to the A. F.
of L. is like that of the States to the
members of the union, not to the
I Federal Government. Their elected
! officers are responsible to the mem
b“> 8 of the union, not to the A. F. of
close of 1940. The present member
have no legal or constitutional au
thority to supersede the officers of a
national or international union or to
give them orders. The A. F. of L,
nas no power of compulsion over these
unions. Their association with the
ArF. of L. is an entirely voluntary
one.
1 nai is as u snouia dc. i ne under
lying principle of the A. F. of L. is
voluntarism. These unions are rep
resented in the annual conventions
of the A. F. of L. on the basis of
their membership. They can, if they
wish, vote to chancre the Constitution
of the A. F. of L. so ai to give the
bentral authority police powers over
them. They have not done so and
they probably will not do so because i
they are jealous of their independence.
They fear dictatorship. They reason
that in a democratic organisation su
preme power should be vested in the
membership rather than a small group
of officers at the top.
Under these circumstances, if con
trol of a national Or international
union passes into bad hands the
American Federation of Labor must
rely on the public authorities and
the membership of the individual
union to correct the situation. True,
.otlirr in A
bf L. can vote to expel a union from
(he Federation, but that would punish
the members of the union rather than
the real culprits. That is not a cure,
but amputation.
Experience has demonstrated that
cases of this kind are extremely rare,
and that they are quickly remedied.
Crooks cannot get away with it in
definitely in unions any more than in
public life. The members of organ
ised labor feel they are capable of
governing their own unions. They do
not consider it wise to sacrifice self
government to dictatorship for the
sake of protection from the possible
danger of racketeers. _ _ .
The American Federation of Labor
does have power to. regulate to some
extent the affairs of directly affil
iated Federal labor unions, State
Federations of Labor and city central
bodies. This power is effectively ex
erted whenever the necessity arises. I
challenge Mr. Pegler or anyone else
to point out a singl case where the
A. Eof L. failed to actagainstwrouf
doing in any of these organizations
over which it possesses regulatory
^Mi^Pegler further charges that the
jA. F. of L. demands public prosecu
tion of union offenders in one breath
and then in the next opposes the cur
Irent antli-trust campaign against un
ions conducted by Assistant Attorney
General Thurman Arnold.
The A. F. of L. does oppose this
campaign. It will never agree that or
ganised labor comes within the scope
of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act which
was adopted to break up corporate
and financial trusts. When this law
was applied against unions, the A.
F. of L. secured the enactment of the
Clayton Act which specifically ex
empted labor unions from the provi
sions of the Sherman Act.
The A. F. of L. and its affiliated un
ions condemn collusion, price-rigging
and monopolistic combines between
local unions and employers. We in
sist, however, that such manifestly il
legal practices, if they exist, should he
prosecuted under the properly appli
cable laws, not the anti-trust laws.
We fear, with good reason, that the
anti-trust laws reWifrr used as an in
strument to deprQy organised labor
and place it under the thumb of the
Federal Government. No legal pres
tidigitation can ever convince us that
workingmen and women associated in
a union for their self-protection
against the entrenched power of in
dustry and capital constitute a trust
inimical to the welfare of the nation.
President Roosevelt recently declar
ed that most newspaper columnists are
wrong 80 per cent of the time. I would
raise that estimate to 100 per cent with
respect to Mr. Perierti baseless at
tacks on the American Federation od
Labor.
FREIGHT HANDLERS’ LOCAL
UNION MAKING PROGRESS
SOUTHEAST. OVER-THE-ROAD CON.
HELD IN CHARLOTTE SAT. - SUNDAY;
NEXT MEET HIGH POINT, MAY 11-12
fied.
Saturday and Sunday the South
's stern Over-the-Road Conference of
the Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf
feurs, Stablemen and Helpers of
America, an A. P. of L. affiliate, held
s conference at the Mecklenburg
Hotel, at which time the fact was
brought out that there is a differ
ential in wages, hours and general
condition of bus and truck drivers in
this section which is wholly unjuati
“ * Three committees were ap
by President Pat Ansboury,
—-mile, Ky., which will report
at the next conference to be held in
High Point, N. C., May 11-12.
The theme of those taking part in
the discussion of freight rates was
that rates in the southeastern states,
states, especially in Georgia, South
Carolina, North Cardins, Virginia,
Tennessee and Kentucky, are uniform,
and that to drive freight trucks in
these regions requires as much skill
and alertness * as elsewhere in the
United States. Hence, declared the
conference spokesmen, there is no jus
tification of th existing differential
in wages, hours, and general condi
tions m this territory, as compared,
for instance, with wages, hours, and
conditions in the territory of which
Indianapolis, Ind., is the center.”
Chairmen of the committees ap
pointed are R. L. McCrorie, of Char
lotte, to study the middle-section be
tween Atlanta and Richmond, Va.;
Tom Heaty, of Baltimore, to study
conditions between Richmond and Bal
timore; J. T. Odum, of Atlanta, to
study conditions in the territory of
which Atlanta is the center. R. C.
Weigle, of High Point, was appointed
a member of the committee to aid Mr.
McCrorie in the Charlotte territory.
Wage differentials and hours were
under fire, and especially relate to in
trestate freight and bus services.
A membership drive in this territo
ry will be taken up, and according
to James P. Berry, of Atlanta, head
of the public relations department of
the organisation, with a membership
of 620,000, is one of the largest un
ions affiliated with the American
federation of Labor. The membership
m the Southeastern states ranges
around 180,000, he said, and the broth
erhood hope more than to double the
number.
. Before the afternoon business ses
sionts, the delegates were guests o 1
local members at a luncheon at the
Mecklenburg hotel. It was at this
meeting that an expansion program
was discussed. Delegates were m at*
tendance from Indianapolis, Ind.,
Louisville, Ky., Nashville, Knoxville,
presided at several of the business
sessions. Clyde Anderson, of Nash-,
▼ille, Tennessee, secretary, kept a rec
ord of proceedings.
The office of vice-chairman was
created and Joe Williams of Indianap
olis, was elected to that poet The
conference adjourned at 6:30 P. M.
Delegates came from Maryland to
Florida and from states in the Middle
West.
Thomas P. O.’Brien, of Indianap
olis, represented the International
Union.
There are now in the area repre
sented at the conference dose to
180,000 members, which it is expect
ed to increase to 400,000 before the
ship of the Teamsters is now nearly
600,000.
Among those present was Frank
Prohl, or Indianapolis, who is also a
representative of the International
body of Teamsters; Joe Williams, of
Indianapolis, a director of the inter
national union; Clyde Anderson, of
Nashville, Tenn., secretary; knd
numerous others in official. position
within the union.
The delegates were guests at a
banquet in the Mecklenburg Hotel din
ing room.
Jrhe meeting was one of a series of
Over-the-Road” conferences sched
uled for various cities within the east
ern section. Recently a similar con
ference was held in Atlanta.
Organiser H. L. McCrorie, of the
Teamsters-and Chauffeurs in this
territory, is entitled much credit for
the way in which this affair was put
put over, and his office in the Build
ers Building was a busy place prior
to and during the convention. As The
Journal has stated before, the Team
sters and Chauffeurs as iar as <—«
uguuuure, nu., rauMHapaui. rn.,
Richmond and Norfolk, Va.
Thomas ^O’Brien, of Indianapolis,
representing the international union,
lost sleep.
THE LABOR PRESS
The labor press Is a sentinel on guard for the of
mankind. Every possible effort should be given in order that
XhP£?<±i~y ** 8tren*thened for greater work
Your labor press renders an incalculable service to those
who work. We cannot too strongly urge our fellow workers
and friends to give loyal and tangible support. No greater
avenue of education is available to the trade union move*
ment than your labor press. The community which supports
its Union paper reflects that co-operation through better,
more effective local unions, councils and central
In Hong Kong it is compulsory that
a cat be kept in every house. In the
larger houses, three cats must be kept.
W.PA. reports that of 700,000
workers laid off last September be
cause they had been on the rolls 18
months, only 13% had private jobs
three months later.
After Darkif... by Rice
PEDESTRIANS
WHO DON'T KNOW
HOW TO DRIVE M
6CT
KILL CL
■ MORE THAN 9
OUT OF EVERY 10
Pedestrians killed
IN CONN. HAD NEVER
BEEN LICENSED TO
drive-They saw the
CAR BUT DIDN'T RE
ALIZE HOW LITTLE THE
DRIVER CAN SEE AFTER
DARK/ /_—
    

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