North Carolina Newspapers

    Facing the Facts
With PHILIP PKARL
Two significant things escaped no
tice in the daily press accounts of
John L. Lewis' threat in a West Vir
Snia speech to form his own private
ird-party.
■ First eras Mr. Lewis’ startling fail
ure to mention the fact that the pres
ent Communist Party organisation
would be the nucleus and foundation
of such a third pa try.
MOVIE FEATURES
PASTURE PROFITS
Hollywood gives us movies which
star dogs, elephants, penguins, and
even a pig like the one Will Rogers
cherished la “State Fair ” But “Green
Acres,” aa all-color movie now mak
ing the rounds of farm meetings, is
the first one to elevate “Bossy,” the
milch cow, to stardom. Included in her
supporting cast are beef cattle, sheep,
hogs, and horses. But “Bossy” gets
all the fat lines—and that’s no joke,
as farmers will observe when they see
the picture at one of their farm
meetings.
The picture tells the story of pas
ture improvement which today is mak
ing ita way into the front rank of up
to-date profitable farming practices.
“Despite the fact that pastors is the
cheapest feed that can bo grown for
any kind of livestock, pastors im
provement is just beginning to receive
the serious attention it deserves,”
said R. H. Losh, Pasture Specialist,
The National Fertiliser Association
and co-director of “Green Acres.” “It
is a crop that responds to plant food,
lime, and good management Results
of hundreds of experiments and dem
onstrations conducted hy State Ex
periment Stations have spot-lighted
its value to every farmer.”
“Every well-fed cow,” said Mr.
Lush, “eats the equivalent of 100
pounds of grass a day. The cost of
producing 100 pounds of digestible nu
trients from oats is $2.02; from corn
silage 11.54; from corn grain $1.38,
while pasture produces this amount
for $.04.”
The results of 34 experiments also
showed that the cost of producing 100
pounds of beef on unfflfprtved ftnfer
tilixed pasture was $4.05, while the
cost on fertilized pasture was only
$2.71. The same experiment showed
that unfertilized pasture produced |
only 12.6 cans of milk per acre, while
the treated pasture made 44 cans.
Results of 7 years experiments at
Tifton, Georgia, show unimproved
pastures produced only 65 pounds of
beef cattle per acre, while carpet grass
and legume pastures fertilised pro
duced 291 pounds of beef per acre.
ZORIC
Dry Cleaning
DOMKST1C LAUNDBT
Pk«MO Sift
notice or sanvicn or summons nr
publication
Suu 0f North Carolina.
Count; of Mecklenburg.
IN THE SUnUUOB OOUKT
Ethel brioe«t Black. Plaintiff.
Vo.
Goaaalcs Black. Dtoeadaat.
. Dm chore naN Mcc4aat, Ccaiclcc Black,
will take aoUco that the above plaintiff hao
ocacataaead a divorce against him os the
groaad of two (t) ;r. ccpatatlca.
Ho will farther take actice that he le re
quired to appear before tho nifcnlticf witkia
thirty (M) fan treat the Mat Maaa at this
■ottos and answer or demur to tho compliant
filed thereto or tho ptototiff will apply to the
sowrt lor tho raUef feaaafal thorato.
1h<* Uth day of March. 1PM.
i. A. BUSSELL. Assistant,
Clerk Seeima Coart.
March Pl-PB. Apr* UkU
BXBCUnVB NOT1CB
Kano* qualified as ezeeatrto of the aetata
of B. L. H11 too, decree sd. lata of Moekton
kars Coast;. N. C.. this la to notify all per
aoaa having claims acaiast aald aetata, to
present them. Mr verified, to the aader
•toned M PM Law Bids., on or bafara March
n. 1P41, or MM aotfao will bo pleaded la bar
of their recovery.
All pciaoac todahtad to said aetata will
please make hendlatl edtlunt with tho an
Tkie tho tPth day ef March. 1P«0.
JESSIE OWENS, Taccatrto.
March tt—April 4. 1L IS. M. May >—B
IN TXB SUPEBIOB COUBT
Wendell L Weaver
will bo saaatad.
Dated this the SI dap of March. 1PM.
J. A. BTTBBE1.1. Aeeietaat
CM* of Sapartor Ctot.
March IS. Apefl 4. 1L 1S-BS
I ■
Second was the equally astonishing
denunciation by Lewis of the Federal
Bureau of Investigation.
If the J. Edgar Hoover’s P. B. I.
agents have been investigating the
CIO and getting into Lewis’ hair,
this is the first we’ve heard about it
• I We do know, however, that these
'Federal agents have been investigat
ing Stalin’s stooges in this country
and ferreting them out of their sec
ret hiding places. Communist lead
ers have been indicted and others
have been forced to register as agents
of a foreign country in accordance
with our laws. Naturally, this sort
of activity has annoyed the Commun
ists no end. How refreshing it is to
see John L. Lewis go to bat for them.
There has also been some specula
tion as twho John L.’s candidate
would be on a third party ticket. The
answer is obvious. No one other than
John L. himself. We said that in this
column two weeks before Lewis made
his speech and we might point out,
with all due modesty, that we called
the turn on his poltical finagalings.
thb red link
There comes to us from a high of
ficial in the Navy Department a copy
of a circular distributed at the gates
of the Washington Navy Yard this
week by Communist agitators.
This leaflet, which bears the im
print of the Communist Party, de
clares that the bitter terms which
Stalin forced down the throat of Pin
land in return for ending the most
brutal and inexcusable war of oppres
sion in modern history, “greatly
strengthened efforts of the interna
tional peace forces.” It added;
“The imperialist war-mongers in
Great Britain, France and the United
States had made a military base of
Finland. They dreamed of turning it
into a lighted fuse with which to
spread the flames of the preesnt war
to the Scandinavian and Balkan
countries and to convert the war into
an onslaught against the workers re
public, the Soviet Union.”
Just think of it! The Communist
Party now openly dares to distribute
KOSELAND
FLORAL CO.
PHONIB nil and list
300 N. Tryw—Csnur Tryou
■Sixth Strwto
SOME OF THE THINGS
WE LEND MONEY ON
All Butuneee Strictly Confi
dent •. When in Need ol
Jhoney We Never Fell
Ten
Reliable Loan Co.
121 K. TRADE ST.
(Meat to Balk's)
Sm Us far Barcates in UhmsB,
Hate*as. Jrwalrj. Clatotog ate
such subversive propaganda to Amer
ican workers in American Navy Yards
engaged in building up America's de
fenses against war.
In one paragraph the leaflet refers
to the “Stalinist peace policy” and
then it proceeds to apply such epithets
as “war-mongers” ana “imperialist”
to our own, idealistic country.
That isn't all. » The leaflet con
tinues:
“Here in the United States, the war
mongers were aided by the Woils,
Dubinskys, Greens and Hillmans. But
they failed miserably in their attempt
to chain the American labor move
ment to the anti-peace policy of
Hoover and Roosevelt.”
boring mo* within
Note that the gentlemen named in
the foregoing paragraph of the Com
munist leaflet all have denounced the
cruel, double-dealing policies of Stalin.
Note, also, that Sidney Hillman is the
only CIO leader attacked. That is be
cause he alone of the CIO top lead
ers has dared to denounce Stalinism.
But the most significant thing in
the Communist leaflet is its conclud
ing statement of the “demands of the
people.” They list the following:
“Defend civil rights. Defeat the
hunger budget. Put an end to the
anti-Soviet policies of the Roosevelt
Administration.”
Defend civil rights? That phrase
has a familiar ring. We have just
received a copy of a call to a confer
ence on “Civil Rights,” to be held April
20 and 21 in Washington by the Wash
ington Committee for Democratic Ac
tion. The President of this newly
formed committee is Merle D. Vincent,
Chief of the Exemption and Hearings
Section of the Wage-Hour Division
of the Department of Labor.
Among the three speakers listed for
a discussion on “civil rights and mi
nority groups are Morris Watson,
left-wing vice-president of the CIO
Newspaper Guild, and Elizabeth Gur
ley Flynn, self-described as a mem
ber of the National Committee of the
Communist Party.
Now we do not have a low boiling
point. _ We have never been particu
larly interested in witch-hunting or
red-baiting. But it seems to us thor
oughly disgusting that officials of
the United States Government should
deliberately or unwittingly play the
game of a foreign organisation which
circulates subversive attacks against
the United States. It seems to me
that Government employes could be
better employed attending to Gov
ernment business.
DeVONDE
Synthetic
CLEANERS — DYERS
HATTERS — FURRIERS
SEVEN POINTS WHY WE ARB
ONE OF THE SOUTH’S LEAD
ING SYNTHETIC CLEANERS
1 Restores original frrahnrao sad
sparkle.
1 Removes careful!; all dirt, daet
mad grease
* Harmless to the most delicate
of fabrics.
4 Odorless, thorough «-g
5 Garments star clean loagor
• Prsss rstainsd loagor
7 Redness wardrobe upkeep
CALL 3-512S
3*4 N. Tryon St
Fertilizer Brings North Carolina Farmers
One Hundred Thirty Million Dollars
Extra dollar return* on Cotton, Vegetable*. and Tobacco, which farmer*
received Nationally for each dollar tpent on fertilizer.
The gigantic sum—three billion dol
lars—which fanners have received
from the Government under the AAA
since 1933 is equaled by the extra
dollar value of increased yields pro
duced by fertiliser in the same period,
according to estimates made from per
sonal interviews with 32,000 farmers
in 35 States.
North Carolina farmers gave the In
terviewers grass-root facts which
show that for every dollar they spent
for fertiliser they received an average
return in increased yields of $4.89. In
other words. North Carolina farmers
spent $27,378,000 for fertiliser. The
extra return which they received from
its use amounted to $133,748,000,
leaving an increased income above the
cost of the fertilizer of $100,370,000.
The returns from each dollar North
Carolina invested in fertiliser, as
shown by The National Fertiliser As
locution survey, varied from crop to
crop. Tobacco led the list with an
increased value return At |9.13. Cot
ton ranked well up with • return of
$3.85. Other crops reported were po
tatoes, which brought $3.97 for each
dollar invested; corn, $1.83; peanuts,
$5.19; and cabbage, $5.11.
North Carolina farmers also had
their say about the effects of fertiliser
on quality of crops. Over 83 per cent
said they got better market quality in
all cash crops, while 52 per ceiw said
they got better feeding quality in
grain and hay, and 19 per cent de
clared they observed better shipping
quality in fruits and vegetables.
Average return in increased yields
for all crops in all States shown by
the survey was $3.60 for each dollar
spent on fertiliser. Nationwide, the
crops showing highest rate of return
were: tobacco, cotton, fruits, and vege
tables.
PATRONIZE JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
F. H. McGuigan,
Clerks Organizer,
Making Progress
F. H. McGuigan, organiser for the
Retail Clerks International Protective
Association reports progress in his
line of endeavor, which Is to place a
strong retail clerks’ organization in
Charlotte. Mr. McGuigan will be sta
tioned in Charlotte for an indefinite
period, and is going to place a real
clerks’ union in Charlotte. A num
ber of membership applications were
received at the meeting last Sunday
afternoon, and Organism* McGuigan
is working at the present time among
the clerks personally, and reports that
he is meeting with success.
NOW
If you have hard work to do.
Do it now.
Today the sldee are clear and Mae,
Tomorrow clouds may come in view.
Yesterday is not for you;
Do it now.
If you have a song to sing.
Sing it now.
Let the notes of gladness ring
Clear as song of Mrd in spring.
Let every day some music bring;
Sing it now.
If you have kind words to say.
Say them now.
Tomorrow may not come your way.
Do a kindness while you may.
Loved ones will not always stay;
Say them now.
If you have a smile to show,
Show it now.
Make hearts happy, roses grow,
Let the friends around you know
The love you have before they go;
Show it now.
Author Unknown.
FLORIDA FEDERATION
CONVENTION IN SESSION
' AT DAYTONA BEACH
DAYTONA BEACH, FIs., April 8.
/—The Florida State Federation of
Labor opened its annual convention
here Monday with an unusually large
attendance. High officials, city, state
and national, including the Governor
of the state and U. S.. congressmen
and Senators, have addressed the
convention.
RESTAURANT WORKERS
AT LONG LAST GETTING A
HEARING OF THEIR CASE
JACKSON, Miss., April 8.—In one
of the most stirring and heated bat
tles of the present session of the Leg
islature, members of the House of
Representatives repudiated a former
Jtote of the body to refuse to investi
gate conditions of employment in the
Restaurant industry of Mississippi,
Wnd by a resouding vote of 72 to 43
brdered a committee from the House
to make a sweeping probe of the
hours, wages, sanitary and moral
phases attendant to sub-marginal
working and living conditions of the
workers affected.
Fog Constipation
Vigor and Pop!
CHEW
PEP-0-LAX
Whoa Buying Aapirta Demand
C B. ASPIRIN
Yes sir,
gentlemen...
Your kind
of style
in
f
SUITS
1V1EN, you know the kind of style you
want ... and the kind of fabric. Just
jome in tomorrow and slip into one of
these attractive suits. Compare the way
it fits, the way it’s made and the work
manship that goes into it. We believe
you 11 be “sold’' on it immediately. Take
your choice of single and double-breasted
styles ... in beautiful shades of blue,
green, grey, tan . . . and, of course the
newest mixtures!
MEN’S STORE—STREET FLOOR
for
TWEEDS! WORSTERS! TWISTS!
PATRONIZE
JOURNAL
ADVERTISERS
I
LISTEN TO THIS
to give
reaction to Body's
n Las Angeles hotels
▼sites program. Object is
rhich stars him each
HtfU B* Emrd P. M.'t
Drive ene el ftm Mi ease ni
compere the price. Tea can't heat
40 DeSoto Custom Auxiliary Coupe.
Beautiful peart pray finish. You
can't tell this car from a new one.
Driven vary little by local man.
Bargain price.
39 DeSoto deluxe 4-door Touring
Sedan. Radio, heater, overdrive,
white wall Urea. Looks and runs
life new.
38 Plymouth 3-door Touring Se
dan. Low mileage, exceptionally
clean throughout.
37 Chrysler Imperial Convertible
Ss. an. Overdrive, radio, boater,
fof iights, beautiful black finish
with red leather upholstery.
36 Pontiac 4-door Sedan. Locally
owned. Extra clean throughout.
36 Chevrolet Standard 3-door Se
dan. Good tires, upholstery like
new. Original black finish.
35 Chevrolet Touring Coach. New
paint. A-l condition.
DeWITT
Motor Conpasy
TSeSOTO • PLYMOUTH
‘ V’. Trade
Dial Uil
Patronize Journal Alwtlww
eHWriririteriWteteteteteteteteS
NOTICE or SUMMONS AND WARRANT
Or ATTACEMBNT
Mack Ira bare County.
North Carolina.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT BEFORE THE
CLERK
J. D. Stewart, Plaintiff.
n.
Edaar Raw la. Defendant.
The defendant to the abore entitled action
will take notice that on the 10th day ef
April. 1040, a aummona is the eaid actioa
waa (sued acainat the defendant by J. Lea*
ley Wolfe. Clerk of Superior Coot for Mach*
Lenburs County, tha plaiatifT claim tint the
»ua> of Pour Hundred (1400.00) DoOaaa due
him for panonal property and for money
wrongfully appropriated by tha defendant
and hoionyins to the plaintiff.
The defendant aha will take aaHaa that
a warrant af attachment waa leaned by eaid
Clark of Superior Court an the 10th day af
Aprfl. 10*0. arainat tha peupetry af eaid da
fondant, which warrant b return abia an tha
tou day of April. 1040. bate* the *
Clark of Superior Court and tha ‘~i ie
required to appear and anewer ar tear On
lha completion af tha nertehr teUeaSon
to-wit Jane 10th. 1040.
TUa the 10th day of April. 1040.
J. LESTER WOUE.
Hark of Superior Chart. Medtlaahan County,
hpril 4. IS, M; May R 0. Id.
    

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