North Carolina Newspapers

    ^»g_OTfLY_REALLY INDEPENDENT WEEKLY in Mecklenburg County
For ■ Weekly Its Readers
tbo LARGEST BUYING POWER ki Owritto
Offktel Organ
Labor Inioi
ihe A. F. of L.
Che Charlotte labor Journal
oar Adrer
Mate TOUB
Truthful, Honest, Impartial
Endorsed by the N. C. State Federa
tion of Labor
and dixie^farm news
Endeavoring to Serve the Masses
VOL. IX—NO. 49
VOUB A OV KMT I •■MINT IN TNC JOURNAL
INVIRTNIMT
CHARLOTTE, N. C, THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 1940
ILOQ Par Ywr
ENACTMENT OF NORTON BILL IS
ASKED BY PRESIDENT GREEN
HAS FULL A. F. OF L SUPPORT
DALLAS, Tex.—The greatest or
ganizing drive ever undertaken in
this territory was launched here with
resounding success by President Wil
liam Green and a thousand other
labor leaders at the Southwestern
Labor Conference.
President Green, in a nationally
broadcast address, declared the Am
erican Federation of Labor is stronger
today “numerically, financially and
in every other way than ever before
in its history.
He called on industry and the farm
ers to join with organized labor in
a national unity program to promote
America’s material welfare and safe
guard American ideals.
He pledged the American Federation
of Labor to do its utmost to keep this
nation out'of the European war.
He warned members of Congress
that the A. F. of L. will judge whether
they are deserving of re-election on
their votes on the Norton Bill, amend
ing the National Labor Relations Act,
which hase the full endorsement of
the American Federation of Labor.
Enthusiastic cheers greeted Mr.
Green’s denunciation of the policy
and activities of Communists in this
country. He pointed out that Nor
way’s key cities fell victom to the
Nazis because of treachery and he
asked whether the current anti
American campaign of the Commun
ist Party did not fall in the same
category.
Secretary-Treasurer George Meany,
several members of the Executive
Council, A. F. of-L. Department heads
and a large number of officers of
national and international unions also
addressed the delegates who repre
sented practically every A. F. of L.
organization in five states—Texas,
Arkansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico
and Arizona.
The two-day meeting was one of
the most outstanding events in the
history of Dallas. Government offi
cials, business men, religious leaders
and the press all co-operated in mak
ing the labor rally go over with a
bang. W. R. Williams, Southeastern
Representative of the A. F. of L., was
in charge of all arrangements and
presided at the meeting.
A constructive and progressive pro
gram for State legislation was adopted
by delegates to the conference, in
vHM
eluding increased benefits under State
unemployment compensation systems
and ratification of the Child Labor
Amendment.
The two outstanding national leg
islative measures endorsed by the con
ference were the Norton Bill and the
amendments to the United States
Housing Authority Act providing new
appropriations for slum clearance.
President Green predicted the Nor
ton Bill will be overwhelmingly
adopted at this session of Congress
if Congress is given an opportunity
to vote on it. He said:
“This measure has the full en
dorsement of the American Federa
tion of Labor because we are confi
dent that it will cure the present
maladministration of the National
Labor Relations Act without weaken
ing or impairing the fundamental
protective principles of the Act which
are so important to labor.
“We will welcome the vote of any
member of Congress for the Norton
Bill as an act of friendship toward
labor. We will be forced to regard
the vote of any member of Congress
against the Norton Bill as an un
friendly act.”
Harry C. Bates, president of the
Bricklayers Union, made a strong
plea for support of new appropria
tions for slum clearance to provide
decent housing for the underprivi
leged and to provide jobs fpr unem
ployed building trades workers. He
said:
“The USHA program is one of the
means to achieve these objectives. It
is not a partisan program. It bears
no political imprint. It is in a real
sense labor’s own program.
“Having done as much as it has to
launch the USHA housing program
labor must not permit it to be scut
tled at the time when the real worth
of this program has been demonstrated
and proved to the world beyong chal
lenge. That is why I ask every dele
gate to this meeting to act without
delay and to appeal to their congress
men urging them to give their full
and unqualified support to S. 591 in
order to insure the enactment of thi
important labor legislation. On you:
action now depend the future jobs oi
thousands of workers. On your ac
tion now depends the future of low
rent housing.”
ATTENTION!
Mr. I. M. Ornburn. Secretary
Treasurer of the Union Label
Trades Department of the Amer
ican Federation of Labor will speak
on the subject “Union Label Ac
tion" on April 30. 1940, from 3:35
to 3:45 p.m. E.S.T. Mr. Ornburn’s
radio address will be carried by
the Columbia Broadcasting System.
The Union Label Trades Depart
ment desires to have all members
of Organized Labor, their families
and friends listen in. If possible,
kindly phone your neighbors of this
broadcast.
Union Label Trades Department
TWAS EVER THUS!
I’ve always noticed great success—
Is mixed with troubles more or less.
An’ it’s the man who does his best
That “gits more blame than all the
the rest!”
—James Whitcomb Riley.
American Federation of Labor.
Labor Favors the
Passage of Wool
Labeling Bill
All members of A. F. of L. are
urged to write their Congressmen and
Senators urging the passage of Jthe
Wool Labeling bill (House Bill 944).
A great deal of “shoddy” mixed wool
and cotton, labeled wool—on the mar
ket that the necessity has arisen that
a distinguishing label should appear
upon such goods to protect the con
sumer.
The Typographical Auxiliary took
this matter up at its meeting Mon
day night of this week and its mem
ber# are complying with the request.
“Yes, mum,” Agnes declared: “My
sister and me ain’t no more alike
than if we wasn’t us; and she’s jus’
as different as me in the other way.”
China entered 1940 internally
stronger than any previous time. On
the other hand Japan is far worse
off than ever before.
THE MARCH Of LABOR
NtWYORK
ACTRESSES.COSTUMER
SKELETONS, FORMEO A PICKET
LIME IN PROTEST A6AIMST
I, DISMISSALS.I9ST
1MC MECHANICS'UNION**
S ASSOCIATIONS.
I IN PHILADELPHIA
rM I02T WAS-fNeFMST
CENTRAL UBOR ORGANIZATION.
*
*S0 LQK6 AS THERE IS
ONE MAM WILLING TO
WOtK(BUT UNABLE TO FIND
EMPLOYMENT, THE HOURS OP
LABOR.ABE TOO LONG?
LINCOLN
i
President Issues Proclamation For
“National Employment Week"
Urges Interest In the
Workers Over Forty
The Federal Security Agency is sending out the follow
ing in regard to “National Employment Week. The letter
addressed to Charlotte Central Labor Union was read and
given whole-hearted endorsement at its meeting Wednesday
night. The proclamation by the President reads:
Both the State and Federal Governments have been especially con
cerned with the problems of older workers, many thousands of whom,
despite their persistent efforts, still lack a place in industry. Among
these are a considerable number of World War Veterans, men who
now average 47 years of age, and who, I feel, have a particular appeal
to our national sense of responsibility.
Our public employment service—a Nation-wide network of 1,600
offices now operated jointly by the State and Federal Governments—
has made special efforts in behalf of workers past 40 years of age,
including veterans. We know from the facts gathered by this Agency
that men and women in middle Mfe possess abilities and skills which
would fit them for employment in nearly every line of work. We knew
further that these older workers, when given an opportunity, demon
strate a seasoned experience ami a mature application to their tasks
which in many callings outweigh the physical advantages of youth.
A year ago, with these considerations in mind, 1 designated a
National Employment Week during which I asked that all our citi
zens give particular and active attention to the problem of older
workers who lack employment. During the month in which the special
week occurred, over a third of a million jobs—a third more than dur
ing the same month of the previous year—were filled through the
public employment offices, and a uartqer of a million of these place
ments were in private industry. Moreover, placements proceeded at
an accelerated rate in the month following the week set aside. Because
of the concerted efforts of government, many public-spirited groups,
and particularly of employers throughout the land, thousands of workers
past 40, among them veterans, shared beneficially in this fine result.
I am grateful for the wholehearted response to my first appeal;
and as President, I desire to encourage a continued Nation-wide inter
est in this persistent problem.
NOW, THEREFORE; I, FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, President
of the United States of America, do hereby declare the week beginning
May 1, 1940, as National Employment Week, and Sunday, May 5, 1940,
as National Employment Sunday. I urge all churches, civic organiza
tions, chambers of commerce, boards of trade, veterans’ organizations,
industry, labor, public-spirited citizens, radio, and the press throughout
the United States to observe that week as National Employment Week,
to the end that interest in the welfare of all the unemployd, and s
pecially the worker over 40, may be stimulated and employment be ex
tended to them.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, 1 have hereunto set my hand and
caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.
FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT
Fertilizer Supplies
Assured Despite Wajr
In contrast to the acute shortage of
fertilizer materials suffered at the be
ginning of the last European war, the
present purchasing season for ferti
lizer finds the country prepared with
adequate supplies for this year’s crops.
“At the beginning of the last World
War an immediate deficiency of nitro
gen carriers occurred,” said Charles J.
Brand, Executive Secretary and Treas
urer of The National Fertilizer Asso
ciation. “There was an almost total
absence of potash. Although there
was plenty of phosphate rock, there
was a shortage of sulphuric acid need
ed to make superphosphate.
“When war disrupted shipping from
1914 to 1918, nitrogen materials for
fertilizer became scarce, as we were
once bound to Chile for nitrates,” said
Mr. Brand. “Today, we not only have
adequate shipping service from Chile,
but our country is the third largest
producer of synthetic nitrogen in the
world, and the largest producer of am
monium sulphate The shortage of
sulphuric acid during the last war
was due to the heavy requirements of
munition manufacturers for process
ing their goods. Improved methods
of munition makers no longer require
sulphuric acid. This leaves an ade
quate supply for use in making super
phosphate.
“In 1914 we were entirely dependent
upon Germany for potash. Today, we
produce at home over 60 per cent of
the potash we use and have sufficient
reserves to care for our entire needs.
In addition to this, French, German,
Palestinian, and Spanish potash are
available.”
Prices farmers pay for fertilizer
are now lower than before the World
War; prices they pay for all commodi
ties average 22 per cent higher.
I
IF YOUR SUBSCRIPTION
IS IN ARREARS
SEND IN A CHECK
Indirect taxes on transportataion
are about $26 annually on each fam
ily, in addition to gasoline and regis
tration fees.
Central Labor
__
Uitttai
While the attendance on Central
Body Wednesday night of this week
was not up to those of the past few
weeks there was no lack of enthu
siasm among the delegates. Dele
gates from the newly-formed Fire
fighters’ Local were obligated ’ and
the representatives of this newly
formed unit were given an ovation.
Reports of locals were very good, and
committees, both standing and special,
gave a good account of their activi
ties. Reports of Charlotte’s two vice
presidents, on the State Federation
executive council, reported on the
meeting of that body in Salisbury on
Sunday, the council promising whole
hearted support in the setting up of
a labor headquarters here, and of the
appointment of a state organizer.
Announcement was made of an
and county offices will be present and
given an opportunity to express them
solves*
Brother L. R. McElice of the Lo
cal Housing Authority, made a re
port of the progress being made, and
paid his respects to some of the at
tackers of the project in no uncertain
terms.
President J. A. Moore presided, with
Secretary Green back at nis post after
being absent last week.
GARNER SNUBS LEWIS
(The following is reprinted
from the Washington Merry
Go-Round Column by Drew
Pearson and Robert S. Allen.
Vice-President Jack I Garner will
hare nothing to do with the man
who assailed him as a “whiskey
drinking, labor-baiting, evil old
man.”
Recently a Senator friendly to
John L. Lewis asked Garner if he
would see the CIO chief. No reason
was given for the request and
Garner didn’t inquire. He was
merely told that Lewis would like
to talk to him.
“My door is always open,"
Garner said. “If he wants to see
me, I won’t stop him. But I can
tell you frankly I have no desire to
have any dealings with him."
Labor Unionists and their families
as consumers have a vast purchasing
power, which if wisely directed to the
buying of Union Label goods, will be
a tremendous force in America.
ATTENTION, CANDIDATES
The CHARLOTTE LABOR JOURNAL is the only
LABOR PAPER published in this section. It covers a
field that you can reach in no other way. Take ad
vantage of its paid circulation for your Political Ad*
vertising. Phone 3-3094.
A. F. L UNIONS WIN TEN PLANTS
IN GENERAL MOTORS ELECTIONS
THERE WILL BE RUN-OFF IN THREE
WASHINGTON, D. C.—The United
Automobile Workers of America, af
filiated with the American Federa
tion of Labor, won exclusive bargain
ing rights for employes in five General
Motors plants in a nation-wide elec
tion conducted by the National Labor
Relations Board.
In addition, the union will be a
contesting party in run-off elections
in two or thiee plants where neither
the A. F. of L. nor CIO unions polled
a majority.
The Patternmakers League and the
International Association of Machin
ists, both A. F. of L. affiliates, also
won collective bargaining rights for
their members in five additional Gen-1
eral Motor plants, according to the
election returns.
Victories for the U. A. W.-A. F. of
L. were scored in two Kansas City
plants, two Norwood, Ohio, plants and
in the General Motors factory at
Meriden, Conn.
Officials of the union said these
victories would give their organiza
tion a strong foothold in the General
Motors setup and prevent the CIO
from obtaining a strangle-hold on the
automobile industry. They are al
ready preparing a new and vigor
ous organizing campaign in the expec
tation that within. the coming year
there will be heavy defections from
the CIO ranks.
“BUDDY” POPPY SALE BY Y. F. W.
ON MEMORIAL DAY HAS THE
ENDORSEMENT OF ALL LABOR
New York, N. Y.f
April 18, 1940.
Dear-Editor:
We are sending you the enclosed
informative material on the annual
National Buddy Poppy Sale of the
Veterans of Foreign Wars which is
conducted during -the week of Mem
orial Day.
We are also enclosing a tear sheet
from Foreign Service, the official
publication of the Veterans of For
eign Wars, showing an article by
Claude M. Baker, President of the
International Typographical Union.
You may quote from this story or take
excerpts from any of the other infor
mation.
Cordially,
G. W. LEFFINGWELL.
“The Veterans of Foreign Wars of
the U. S. has long demonstrated its
friendship for organized labor. It
is the only veterans' organization of
which I know that has consistently
required that the union label be used
on all its printing.
“That fact, coupled with its con
sistent refusal to permit any of its
Posts to adopt any measures detri
mental to labor, warrants the support
of every union member who is also
an ex-service member.
“The V. F. W. has rigidly adhered
to the principles and policies to which
it is dedicated. It has never injected
itself into the internal affairs of labor
unions nor has it sought to set ex
service men in labor unions against
those who are not eligible to mem
bership.
“The V. F. W. confines its activi
ties to the affairs of veterans and
has never in any sense indulged in
partisan political campaigns.
“Thousands of the members of the
I. T. U., saw foreign service in the
Spanish-American and World War
and many of these, like myself, have
long been affiliated with the V. F. W.
“Since the V. F. W. is, like the
I. T. U., a democratic organisation
to a most marked degree, every union
printer who is eligible because of
having served his country in time of
war, will find affiliation pleasant and
profitable.
“The V. F. W. is to be commended
for its advocacy of legislation de
signed to protect and benefit veterans.
“No other veterans’ organisation
has a record which so thoroughly jus
tifies the co-operation and support
of those who believe in the American
labor movement.
"In the V. F. W., real comrad hip
is found. Every veteran, particm . jy
should be happjr to par
ticipate In the program it is c
out.
V.'F. W. of the u“s7‘
I Typo Auxiliary
Met Monday Night
With Mrs. A. B. Furr
Despite the. fact that some of its
members are sick at home, or hos
pitalized, the ladies of the Typo
graphical Auxiliary held a well-at
tended meeting last Monday night
with Mrs. A. B. Furr, 2516 West
moreland avenue; Officers present
were Mrs. C. B. Capps, president;
Mrs. H. E. Carriker, vice-president;
Mrs. J. E. Kumpie, secretary. Mrs.
Robert White, chairman of the label
committee made an excellent report,
as did Mrs. C. L. Granger, of the
educational committee.
The sick committee reported that
Mrs. Hugh Sykes and Mrs. Buford
L. Green had recovered after recent
operations, and that Mrs. George
S. Coble was still in the hospital
recovering from an operation.
The meeting date was changed
from the fourth Monday of the month
to the first Monday, which will make
the next meeting date fall on Mon
day, May 6th, at which time the Aux
iliary will meet with Mrs. Herrin,
at 229 Trangell avenue, who will act
as hostess.
P. 0. Clerks Auxiliary
Held Meeting Mon.
With Mrs. Freeman
On Monday afternoon at the home
°* Mrs. A. H. Freeman, on Dixie
road, the Women's Auxiliary held
a meeting, Mrs. F. T. Alexander act
ing as joint hostess. The regular
business was held following a lunch
eon, which was enjoyed by all.
WORK ON A & P WEST
TRADE STREET STORE
IS BEING DONE UNION
_ C. Hower, Charlotte Carpenters
Local No. 1469 business representa
tive, informs The Journal that all
carpenter work on the new A. A P.
store on West Trade street is being
done union and that many other union
contracts are being made.
•smmswwwwvmwwwwww
Teamster-Chauffeur
Union Gets Members;
Holds Gains Made
H. L. McCrorie, business agent for
Teamsters and Chauffeurs Local No.
72, one of the largest in this sec
tion of the south, reports that mem
bers are being added at each meet
ing, and the gains made in recent
months are being held, with pros
pects for further contracts in the
near future being exceedingly good.
This organisation has been buut up to
a membership of around 600 in this
territory, with Charlotte as the foun
tain head.
Don’t Forget Mother
On “Mother’s Day;
Sunday, May 12th
ISunday, May 12, will be Mother’s
Day, and we all should wear a rose
red or white, to suit the case, and we
all should remember her in some way
—with floaters, kindness, candy, a
gift or a more substantial remem
brance; but the least we can do is
to remember her wit!) reverence and
love; remembering she is our mother;
that she went through the valley of
death and was ever and will ever
be our best friend.
MRS. HARRY BOATE
VISITING FRIENDS
IN WASHINGTON, D. C.
The Journal is in receipt of a card
from Mrs. Harry Boate, widow of the
late Harry Boate, who is in Wash
ington, D. C., where she is visiting
old-time friends, she having resided
in Washington for many years where
her late husband was in the employ
of the government. Mrs. Boate has
many friends in and out of labor and
they will be pleased to hear that she
is in good health and spirits.
HERE’S FUN
Jones: "Well, how do you find
married life?”
Bones: "Great fun! My wife cooks
and I guess what the dish is!”
Labor Journal's Anniversary Edition
The Labor Journal will issue its Anniversary Edition the
16th of May, the 11th of May marking the completion
of nine years of service in the labor field in Charlotte. It
will mark the beginning of its tenth year, and it is proud
of the fact that it has won the distinction of holding on
longer than any other labor publication has ever carried on
in this section. Its editor has striven for peace, harmony and
good will between Capital and Labor, and the edition will
carry cards from many of its well wishers.
    

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