North Carolina Newspapers

    The Charlotte Labor Journal
AND DIXIE FARM NEWS
M2 Soath College Street—(Second Floor)
PHONB S-3M4
■MoO m Moad-cbM* MM. laloif 11. 1M1. at tba Poat Ottto* at CaarlotU. H. O.
adar Ik* An of March I. IK*
t
W. M. WITTER------Editor and Publisher
CLAUDE L. ALBEA_AaeodaU Editor
CHARLOTTE, N. C., THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 1940
WINCHELL RAPS PEGLER
Walter Winchell, newspaper and radio columnist, meted out a
severe verbal lambasting to Westbrook Pegler in a recent column
syndicated through 162 newspapers.
Retaliating to an attack on him by Pegler, Winchell gave the
following low-down on his conferre:
“He poses as the holiest of journalists, who is never in error.
He never blunders. . . . He, if you please, is the healthy example of
newspaperman by gum. . . . Well he’s not that pretty. . . . His
argument the newspapermen should never accept free drinks from
cafe owners clashes with the facts. ... He accepts them—often did.
... Fight and rassling tickets, too. . . . Most chiselers wouldn’t think
of paying their way in—unless they had to. . .
“And so when this bird raps people (who permit joints to swap
free drinks for free mentions) he should add that on a certain Sat
urday night in a B’way spot( the jammed night of the week, yet!)
he forgot his high morals and ethics and let the joint pick up his
check.
"I could fill a column and a half with some of his phony ex
ploits. ... You probably never suspected that an obscure reporter
out in Hollywood did all the real work in digging up the evidence
on a labor racketeer for which my superior has been thefting all the
blows. . . . But that’s a story for the trade—and how they’ve been
burning up about it since Our Hero has been acknowledging ail the.
applause.
“A few years ago he was privileged to enter the gambling casino
of a night club where he dropped a few dollars. ... He evened mat
ters a few columns later by demanding that the place be closed.
He panned it bitterly. ... A louse in the blouse of journalism if
there was one—an dhis msistatements of fact would bore you stiff
. . . When some of us do do news columns blunders and the blun
der is harmful—and we are asked to correct it—we oblige. ...
This bird has never played that fair with his victims.”
HARRISON ASKS SHORTER
HOURS TO HELP JOBLESS
WASHINGTON, D. C.—A warning
that the Federal Government must
definitely and speedily solve the ten
year-old problem of unemployment
to remove the danger to democratic
and social institutions in the United
States created by a large jobless army
featured the testimony before the
Temporary National Economics Com
mittee by George M. Harrison, presi
dent of the Brotherhood of Railway
Clerks, A. F. of L. affiliate.
Of 50,000 questionnaires sent to
American students in Catholic col
leges as to war) 36 per cent declared
they would be conscientious objectors.
Two-thirds of adults replying, made
similar statements.
Government Reports
A Bumper Yield
Lower crop acreages and higher
yields are the startling achievements of
farmers revealed in the 1939 Govern
ment Crop Report From the fewest
number of acres harvested under nor
mal weather conditions since the
World War, farmers reaped yields
A a Up toward bigger yield*.
that were only 1 per cent under the
record year of 1938, when more acres
were harvested.
Many major factors behind this ac
complishment are revealed in personal
interviews with 32,000 farmers in 35
States. Better all around farming
practices stand out.
Every farmer interviewed in The
National Fertilizer Association survey
made an estimate based on yields ob
tained with and without fertilizer.
North Carolina farmers stated they
got an increase of 123 per cent on
corn; 186 per cent on tobacco; 159 per
cent on cotton; 100 per cent on wheat;
and 175 per cent on potatoes.
POSSEHL NOMINATED FOR
ENGINEERS’ PRESIDENT
WASHINGTON, D. C.—The Inter
national Union of Operating Engin
eers wound up their two-week con
vention here by voting an increase
in local per capita tax to the inter
national union from 75 cents to $1
iper month. The delegates re-nomi
nated for another term John Possehl,
Savannah, Ga., who has been general
president for nine years.
Labor Press
Vital Need
The freedom of the press, guar
a iiteed to ns by the Conaitatisa,
must depend after all upon the sap
port which the readers of the proas
give to it. We need scarcely stars
than mention the fart that the
usual daily newspaper, to say noth
ing of the magazines, do not fssl
called upon to espouse the caase
of organised labor. Such fair plan
as is given this cause by these pub
lications is based upon the unan
swerable strength of the position
of the labor movement.
But we wish to emphasise the
fact, that if there were ne great
section of the national publications
known as the Labor Press, which
gives its first and last loyalty to
the workers of the nation, and es
pecially to those who are members
of the organizations of labor, the
other sections of the notion’s pub
licity organs would probably pay
much more scant attention to the
rights of labor.
Circulation ia the life of any
publication. Given readers. any
publication to in a position of pow
er, in proportion to its friends who
■how their loyalty to their own
cause by their subscriptions to their
own press, and by their activity in
helping to enlarge its circulation.
The rights of labor will always
depend, to a great extent, upon the
freedom of the labor press. A la
bor paper which circulates freely
in its own community to an index
of the power of labor in that lo
cality. It to a very definite part
of the organization itself, and its
function* are ao vital that neglect
•' »hc labor press to sure to reflect
■» '>*» qualities of the labor
"•-«l itself.
REX
RECREATION
AND BOWLING ALUET
Whore Union Mm Moot
m-lST S. TV.TON 0T. <
Isnr Round Air CendMamad
WHAT LABOR CONTRIBUTES
BY CHARLES STELZLE
(Member International Association at Machinists)
“Before business can absorb the
jobless, employers must have the
money to ‘create’ new jobs,” it is said
by employers of labor, and just now
it is being repeated by certain poli
ticians. There’s no doubt about it—
but it should not be forgotten that
workers themselves would be making
a most valuable financial contribu
tion in such a transaction.
We are informed that for each
worker employed, the steel industry
must furnish $11,000; the manufac
turing industries must furnish $8,000;
and the ordinary business must put
up $4,000. But each worker as he
enters industry represents an approxi
mate outlay of $10,000 by the parents
of the worker, the State, and other
public institutions. Thus, the aver
age worker comes into the plant as
the equivalent of a $10,000 machine,
and he usually more than matches
what the investor is asked to spend
in order to create a job for him.
Furthermore, the worker must
spend most of his wages to pay for
his personal “upkeep” and “repairs.”
He provides his own food, clothing,
and housing, and he is responsible
for keeping up his health, so that
he may continue to be a good pro
ducer. A very small percentage of
his wages is spent for his cultural life
and for his “leisure activities,” al
though, it should be said, these also
• 3A*q *£|dd*. pjnoM siq) uioqM o)
sa)e)g pajiuQ aq} ui sjaiusa-aSsM
000‘000‘0k X|«)«uiix(uddv aq) ‘sisaq
siq) uodfi -suua) auivs aq) u'odn
pajnaas aq X«ui ‘an[*A i3)Bajif usas
jo |vnba jo ‘jaqjoM jaq)OU* ‘uoswaj
Xu« joj )U*|d aq) jo )no dojp pjnoqs
aq ji -jaqaoM a sb anjBA siq o) pps
value of $400,000,000,000. Accord'
ing to latea reports, this equals the
wealth of the United States as ordi
narily calculated.
Whatever may be said regarding
what others have paid to help sup
port the public institution* wfiich
had a part in the preparation of the
American worker, all of the argu
. ments fail when they are applied t<
the millions of foreign-born workers
in industry who came to this country
full-fledged, ready for a job. They
were prepared at the expense of the
countries from which they came.
This is particularly true of the so
called “refugees,” large numbers of
whom are technically trained men and
women.
It is reported with great concern
that the fifteen largest banks in New
York City are “waging a losing fight”
because 42% of their cash assets,
amounting to something over $7,000,
000,000 a re “idle." If 10,000,000 work
ers in this country are unemployed,
they represent an “idle” cash value
of $10,000,000,000, and many of these,
LOANS
To tv, Repaid Weekly, Semi-Monthly or Monthly
SAVINGS
Xmaa Ct.ibs, Weekly Savings or Certificate of Deposit
INDUS'! fUAL LOAN & INVESTMENT BANK
124 S. Church St.
YOU OWE IT TO YOUR
CHILDREN TO HAVE AN
Automatic Gas
WATER
HEATER
for Hof Wofor
of All Times
When there are small children in a home,
hot water must be on tap every hour of,
the day and night. The beauty of these
automatic gas water heaters is that they
keep your water hot in summer aa well
as in winter, and may be regulated to
your family's requirements. Se them to
day!
1
TERMS:
$C piou ** for YOUR
f J CASH OLD HEATER
24 Months To Pay
Tune In WBT—Tues.—Thurs.—Sat. 2:15 P. M.
WSOC—8:30 A. M.—Mon.—Thurs.—Sat.
^ -
POWER COMPANY
430 South Church St. Phone 4112
Martin’s Dept. >Store
RELIABLE MERCHANDISE ALWAYS
AT LOW PRICES
OUR NEW STORE NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS WITH A COMPLETE STOCK OF SPRING AND SUMMER
MERCHANDISE.
«
<
L
a
too, ore “waging a losing fight.” The
biggest-^problem facing America to
d*y * how, W Put the “idle workers”
and the “idle money” at work, so that
they may both win their fight. But
don t let us forget that all real wealth
is simply stored-up labor.
WHO'S WHO
IN UNIONS
1 JAMES M. DUFFY \
JAMES M. DUFFY
James M. Duffy, President of the
National Brotherhood of Operative
Potters, took up employment in a
pottery at East Liverpool in 1903,
and became a member of the Pot
ters’ Union in 1909, when he be
came an apprentice. Later he served
as President of the East Liverpool
Trades and Labor Council. In 1927
he was elected President of the
National Brotherhood of Operative
Potters, which office he now holds.
He has been a delegate to the
American Federation of Labor con
ventions for the past 12 years. t\
Mr. Dully served on the Labor
(Advisory Committee of the Ohio
Workmen’s Compensation Commis
j sion and on the National Labor Ad
visory Board of the National In
dustrial Recovery Administration.
In 1937 he was the American Labor
delegate to the International Labor
Conference in Geneva, Switzerland.
Mr. Duffy is one of the outstand
ing leaders in the “Buy American”
movement. At the American Fed
eration of Labor' convention in
Denver he introduced a resolution
for the boycott of Japanese goods.
Later, in 1937, he organized and
sponsored a mass “Buy American”
rally. In every field of Labor ac
tivity Mr. Duffy has distinguished
himself as an unusual leader. He.
has participated in round-table dis
cussions on Labor in coast-to-coast
radio broadcasts and other public
discussions on the subject.
Under his guidance the National I
Brotherhood of Operative Potters
has grown in strength and mem
bership, and the pottery industry
has received the protection of his
effective fight against foreign-made
products.
His address is: Mr. James M.
Duffy, President, National Brother
hood of Operative Potters, Box 6,
East Liverpool, Ohio.
i
POTTERS’ UNION LABEL
The National Brotherhood of
Operative Potters was organized in
1890 after the withdrawal irom the
Knights of Labor. In 1899 it be
came affiliated with the American
Federation of Labor.
A lapel button with the eye and
handclasp was adopted in the early
days of the organization. In 1936
the Potters adopted the Union Label
shown above. It is displayed on all
Union-made pottery.
For further information regard
ing Union Labels, Shop Cards and
Service Buttons write Mr. I. M.
Omburn, Secretary-Treasurer, Un
ion Label Trades Department,
American Federation of Labor
Building, Washington, D. C.
China dominates large areas form
erly held by the Japs.
SalT
AVANT
COAL I
1 Special 1
I STOKER
I * COAL
_
I
Houses Passes Bill
Dealing With Unions
Curb. U. S. Agencies
WASHINGTON, D. C.—The House
approved and sent to the Senate the
Walter-Logan bill which was unani
mously endorsed at the 1939 conven
tion of the American Federation of
Labor.
The bill provides that rules and
regulations issued by the National
Labor Relations Board and other in
dependent Federal administrative
agencies ipust be approved by the
United States Circuit Court of Ap
peals here before they become ef
fective. It is intended to curb bureau
cratic mistakes.
EASY FITTED?
A 300-pound man stood gazing
longingly at the enticing display in a
haberdasher’s window. A friend stop
ped to inquire if he was thinking of
buying the marked-down lavender
silk shirt.
Fat Man (wistfully)—Gohr, no!
The only thing that fits me ready
made is a handkerchief!
At DeWITT’S
37 Dodge
Coach _
37 Plymouth
Coupe__
36 Dodge Touring
Sedan _
36 DeSoto
Airflow _
34 Chevrolet
Coach*_
$395
$365
$325
$295
$175
MANY OTHERS
DeWitt Motor Co.
DeSoto —■ Plymouth
428 W. Trade Dial 5111
— - - ■ —— —i—i—i—i—i—i—»—ii—irii~u~u~»-~i~j~Li~u~
ROSELAND
FLORAL CO.
PHONRS §1*1 AND tin
.300 N. Try on—Corner Tryen
and Sixth Streets
DeVONDE
Synthetic
CLEANERS — DYERS
HATTERS — FURRIERS
SEVEN POINTS WHY WE ARE
ONE OF THE SOUTH’S LEAD
ING SYNTHETIC CLEANERS
1 Restores original freshness sad
sparkle.
2 Removes carefully all dirt, dust
and grease
S Harmless to the most delicate
of fabrics.
4 Odorless, thorough cleaning
5 Garments stay clean longer
i Press retained longer
7 Reduces wardrobe upkeep
CALL 3-5125
304 N. Tryon St.
PIANO SPECIALS
tE
l» I.IIIJII
SOME OF THE THINGS
WE LEND MONEY ON
All Business Strictly Confi*
' dent‘d. When in Need of
Money We Never Fail
You
Reliable Loan Co.
121 E. TRADE 8T.
(Next to Balk’s)
Sm Us far Bargains in
Watch si. Jcw.lry, <
For Quality Drag* and Sundries
Visit the
SELWYN CUT RATE DRUG STORE
129 W. Trad* St
AND THE
TsL Mill
NANCE DRUG STORE
MB N. CaswsD Brad
“Charlotte’s Friendly Dra« Stand”
JOHN 8. NANCE, Prspristas
TsL Ml*
    

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