North Carolina Newspapers

    Facing the Facts
With PHILIP PEARL
You won’t discover it from reading'
the newspapers, but the fact is that
the CIO suffered a stunning defeat
in the General Motors elections.
They expected and prayed for a
dean sweep. Instead, the A. F. of
L. auto workers won outright vic
tories and exclusive bargaining rights
in five General Motors plants; they
will get a chance to win over two or
three additional plants in run-off elec
tions and the Patternmakers and Ma
chinists, between them, won the right
to exclusive representation of their
craft in five more plants.
Thus the CIO failed to obtain a
strangle-hold on the General Motors
organization. Without such a
strangle-hold they are lost.
This is why. The CIO auto work
ers union is built on sand. It has
never been able to collect dues from
its membership. In the past year
John L. Lewis has been forced to
siphon off some two million dollars
from the treasury of the United Mine
Workers to finance the auto workers
union. This money was used not to
organize but to buy union members
and union officials. The CIO organ
izing campaign in the auto union
was one of wholesale bribery.
Lewis considered the expenditure
of these vast sums as an investment.
He hoped and prayed the elections
would result in a clean sweep for the
CIO. Then he intended to demand
that General Motors give him a single
contract covering all their workers,
including the check-off.
NO CHECK-OFF. NO DUES
Now these hopes are dashed. The
company will insist on bargaining sep
arately with the workers in each plant.
It has a perfect right to do so. It
will never agree to the check-off. And
without the check-off the CIO auto
workers union will continue to be a
drain on the CIO and a liability to
John L. Lewis.
No union whose officers are bought
and whose members have been sold
down the river can command loyalty
from its members. Without loyalty
there will be no dues. Without dues,
the union will be unable to stand on
its own feet and operate on its own
income. Lewis will "have to keep on
paying the bills.
This is a bitter disappointment to
Lewis. He gave his hand away in
his speech at Flint, Mich., when he
said he expected toe auto workers
union to pay back its heavy debts to
the CIO. This could have been ac
complished with the check-off. Then
Lewis would have been able to muk
the dues from the CIO auto workers
union and use the money to finance
other campaigns. Now he can see
no way oi getting the CIO out of
the red. ,. „
These are not all his troubles. He
expected to wipe out all competition.
But the victories of the A. F. of L.
auto workers union chackmated him.
He will still have to fight and spend
to keep what he has. The A. F. of
L. union will never give up. It will
continue pressing its organizing cam
paign relentlessly. It will do its ut
most to show by example how a stable,
self-governing, self-disciplined union
can benefit its members. It will
obtain the highest possible wage and
the best possible working conditions
for the workers it represents. And it
won’t be long until the workers repre
sented by the CIO union look with envy
at the better conditions obtained by
their colleagues represented by the
A. F. of L.
But Lewis’ outstanding and con
tinuing trouble is that he still has
the Communist wreckers in charge of
his auto workers union. They are
still running the union on orders from
Moscow. The President of the union
is a mere figure-head. Even the CIO
auto workers publicity man is paid
more than the President. The real
control is exerted by Communist
agents who are more interested in
stirring up discontent and revolution
among the workers than in improving
conditions.
And the Communists will not let
go, even if Lewis should try to force
them out. The automobile industry
is a key industry in this country. It
is more important in war than in
peace. Stalin’s hostility to the United
States is apparent in every word of
propaganda issued by his henchmen
in this country. It is more to his
advantage to wreck the American
automobile industry than to stabilize
it.
There will be more CIO strikes.
NORTH CAROLINA FARMERS TALK FERTILIZER PRICES
I
Fertilizer price* lower than other commodities which farmer* buy.
“Do you think the price you paid
for that last purchase you made is too
high?” Ask that of any man or
woman any time and get about the
same answer as if you asked, “Are
taxes too high?” Nevertheless, in a
recent survey made in North Carolina
and 34 other States, over 32,000 farm
ers were asked point blank, “Do you
think fertilizer prices are high?”
North Carolina farmers replied as fol
lows: “Yes, they are high,”> said 40.7
per cent “They are low,” said 5.6 per
cent. The remainder, 53.7 per cent, re
plied that prices were average.
Now the Department of Agricul
ture releases a statement which an
swers the same question. “Since 1932
fertilizer prices have been fairly stable
at a little below the 1910-1914 aver
age,” says the report. “Fertilizer
prices, as a percentage of the 1910
1914 average, are considerably lower
than prices of most commodities
bought by farmers. In fact, all com
modities are 16 per cent higher than
the average, while fertilizer prices
are 6 per cent lower."
The report continues: “New devel
opments in science and technology,
such as the production of synthetic
nitrogen, have reduced production
costs and prices.
Paint Up and Clean Up Week
APRIL 27 THROUGH MAY 4
SMITH-WADSWORTH HARDWARE
CO., INC.
ARE OFFERING VERY SPECIAL PRICES ALL
THROUGH THEIR STORE ON
GARBAGE CANS, MOPS, BROOMS, WAXES, POLISHES,
PAINTS, BRUSHES.
BETTER GO DOWN AND SEE THEM
SMITH-WADSWORTH HARDWARE
CO, INC.
428 South Tryon St. Phone 3-5161
There will be more suffering and hun
ger for the workers. For that is
what the Communists want.
Under these circumstances, it is
not optimism but sound reason which
prompts us to predict that the CIO
reign in the automobile industry will
be violent and short-lived. It may
take a year, it may even take two
years, but the American Federation
of Labor is bound in the end to win
over the automobile workers event
ually and establish their organization
on a constructive, progressive, Ameri
can basis.
The economic and industrial devel
opment of China’s western provinces
are going forward at an unprecedent
ed rate. *
Patronize Journal Advertisers
DIES UNIT WILL PROBE
COMMUNISM IN SCHOOLS
WASHINGTON, D. C.—The House
Committee on Un-Americanism is
planning hearings “on Communism
in universities and schools,” Chair
man Dies of the committee announced.
One committee investigator, Mr. Dies
said, is studying textbooks in Hie
search for material opposed to Ameri
can principles and institutions.
“A cheerful temper joined with in
nocence, will make beauty attractive,
knowledge delightful, and wit good
natured. It will lighten sickness, pov
jrty and affliction, convert ignorance
into an amiable simplicity, and render
deformity itself agreeable.”—Joseph
Addison, English Essayest.
POLITICAL ADVERTISING
VOTE FOR MAXWELL
FOR
GOVERNOR
A. j. MAXWELL
Candidate for Governor
THE ONLY CANDIDATE TO EVER CARRY
A UNION CARD
POLITICAL ADVERTISING
VOTE FOR
Mrs. Jessie Caldwell Smith
(Now Acting County Treasurer)
FOR
County Treasurer
**f-~ -v-i
Meckenburg County
LABOR VOTE APPRECIATED
CHARLOTTE |
Fri.-Sat. |
CHEER AGAIN! THEY’RE HERE AGAIN!
Based upon CHIC
YOUNG’S Comte Strip '
I
MINOR ACCIDENT
A bricklayer working on top of a
high building carelessly dropped a
bnck which landed on the head of his
»p there,”
the helper shouted up. “You done
made me bite m&h tongue.”
The United Jewish Appeal for Refu
gees announced that it had assigned
$126,000 to Catholic refugees and a
like amout nto non-Catholics.
ANCIENT HISTORY
Freshman (preparing an essay):
“What do they call those tablets the
Gauls used to write on?”
Roommate: “Gaul stones.”
ANSWERED
He: “Do you smoke?"
She: “No, I don’t smoke.”
He: “Do you drink?”
She: “No, I don’t drink.”
He: “Do you pet?”
She: “No, I don’t pet.”
He: “Well, what do you do?”
She: “I tell lies,"
PATRONIZE THOSE
WHO ADVERTISE IN
THE JOURNAL
BAYED!
Police Judge: “What is your excuse
for speeding through the town at 60
miles an hour?”
Defendant: "Well, your honor, I
had just heard the women of my wife’s
church were haring a rummage sale,
and I was rushing home to save my
other pair of pants.”
Police Judge: “Acquitted. Next
PHILADELPHIA, Pa.—More than
l0Vundu?triali8t* and members of
the Chamber of Commerce were urged
to ‘‘deal with a union” by William
L. Blatt, president of SKP Indus
tries, Inc., and chairman of the board
Of the American Management Asso
ciation.
“The idea of organized labor is
sound,” he said. “Collective bargain
ing as a guarantee to labor is here
to stay. The Wagner Act may be
modified in some respects but its m«in
features will be retained. I dont get
nearly as worried about the Act as
some people, for in the long run the
right will come out.”
QUITE SO
Teacher: “How many make a
dozen?”
Pupil: “Twelve.”
lion?”Cher: *'How many make a ma*
Pupil: “very few.”
SOUTHERN
DAIRIES, be.
600 W«t Fifth Struct
CHARLOTTE, N. C.
Telephone 3-1164
Ueu>
isr-*
St* ?22k!5yj*
d SSS2V5J "*««S2
A 79© and «Tf,
«npe., ch£L"”«»faf atto* 1!Bit'
Models ri!,8 and new “r *d coiors,
■ Thej're «o»fy «ioSr,,uc'“ C'
■&)« Smart
jY®*> Slack#
*« *4«j
ss'Sess?*
Sheb, n.»5 ^ ** ’
*»««P
CAREFUL, NOW!
“Harry surprised me by telling me
we were going to France on our honey
moon.”
“How nice, and how did he spring
it on you!”
“He said that as soon as we were
married he would show me where
he was wounded in the war."
CORRECT
Teacher: “What is it that Brazil
produces more of than any other
country?”
Pupil: “Brazilians.”
Salvation Army is the oldest
non-Nazi organization permitted to
religious work among German soldiers.
Bubbling springs of asphalt on the
Euphrates River in Me* -
PATRONIZE THOSE
WHO ADVERTISE IN
THE JOURNAL
VARIETY OF
FOODS
TMitiiiiM meats, —»■*« a«e
sens, breeds — you'll find not
two vr three, but many to
choose from
VS‘W<
GAKTHIA.
NOTICE or 8KBVICE or SUMMONS BT
PUBLICATION
State of North Carolina,
Stats of North Carolina,
County of Msrtrlenbura.
IN IBS SUPERIOR COURT
Paul H. Wilkins, Plaintiff,
as.
Louisa 0. Wilkins, Defendant.
The above dafsndaat will taka noties that
an astiss has baan com a> an rad by tbs said
plaintiff la tha shots court for t divorce ab
solute so tbs srouuda of two (I) years sap
ante.
8ha will farther taka aotiea that she is re
adied to appear before tha dark of the above
court within thirty (N) days treat tha laat
iaaae of thie nodes and answer or daarar to
this complaint or the plaintiff will apply to
dm court for tha relief J--j-j in said
i. LESTER WOLFE,
OaA Superior Court.
April II, K. May t I.
Because of the fierce weather con
ditions existing while the Russian ar
my bogged down in snow and far be
low zero weather, Stalin fired the
head of the weather bnrean in
for furnishing such terrible weather.
NOTId or SUMMONS.
North Cmith.,
Mecklenburg County.
IN THS SUFKRIOE OOUMT
Wendell L Weaver
m.
Ana H. Weaver.
The defendant. Agnee H. Wwe Vi
notice that the plaintiff hM
above entitled action
poeo of obtaining i
ground* of etatutorp
ie required to appear
Court at hie office in
County. North Carolina, h Sa
April, mo. or within tkirtp dap*
and answer or denar to the (
the plaintiff,
wfll be
Dated thi* the tt dap of
I.
at
March U. April 4, U.
Having qualified as
of H. L. Hilton,
bus Coutr, N. 0.,
M having elate
signed .at 808 Law
28. INI, or tUa notlea
of their recovery.
All
This the Uth day of
March 28—April 4. 11. IS. M.
NOTIC* OP SUMMONS
OP ATTi
Mecklenburg County,
North ihieliM,
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
J. D. Stewart, Plaintiff,
ter Wolfe, Clark e<
lenburg Coanty, tl
tom of :
him for
wrongfully
and belonging to
The defendant
a warrant ef
Clark of
April, 1M0.
fondant, which warrant k
20th day of April, 1848,
Clerk of
required to
the Complaint
the completion of the
to-wit Jane 10th. 1848.
Thle the 18th day of April, 1848.
P.1
Clerk of Super hi
April 4. It. If; May 1.8. 18.
IP 1.
    

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