North Carolina Newspapers

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the LARGEST BUYING POWER to
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(he A. F. of L.
Clip Charlotte
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tion of Labor
AND DIXIE FARM NEWS
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VOL. IX—NO. 51
YOUR ADVKHTI9IMCMT IN TMf JOURNAL l« A
INVKSTWBNT
CHARLOTTE, N. G, THURSDAY, MAY f, 1940
*2.00 Per Ymt
N. C. STATE FEDERATION RECOVERS
PROPERTY AND MONEY FROM
SANDEFUR, FORMER SEC.-TREAS.
WINSTON-SALEM. May 6.—For
almost three years officers of the
North Carolina State Federation of
Labor have been attempting to obtain
the Federation’s money and property
which had been held by E. L. Sande
fur, former secretary-treasurer of the
State Federation of Labor. Suit had
been filed in the Superior court to
force Sandefur, who deserted the
American Federation of Labor to join
up with the CIO, to turn over the
State Federation’s property and
money to the officers of the State
body. Hearings were held, and in
each instance the court held against
Sandefur and in favor of the North
Carolina State Federation of Labor.
Sandefur even appealed the case to
the Supreme court, and this high body
sustained the lower cout’s decision in
the matter.
Klledice and Wells, well known
Winston-Salem law firm, handled the
case for the State Federation of La
bor. When the ease had been re
manded to the Superior court for trial
and the date set. attorneys for Sande
fur threw up their hands and said
Sandefur was ready to act. The court
signed an order embracing the item
ized list of property and sums of
money to be turned over to the offi
cers of the State Federation of Labor
by Sandefur.
President Fink, Secretary-Treasurer
Fisher snd all Board members of the
State Federation of Labor have
worked diligently on this matter, and
are receivin g ehtocrngp theW N.R
are receiving the congratulations of
labor throughout the state for the
successful conclusion of their efforts.
A. F. of L. Is Making
Headway With
Signed Agreements
At Winston-Salem
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C., May 6.
—In the general progress being made
by A. F. of L. unions in Winston
Salem, the signing of the new agree
ments and renewal of expiring con
tracts seem to be the order of the day.
Machinists Local Union No. 641 has
-just renewed agreements with the
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Com
pany, covering the plants here, in
Petersburg, Va., and Louisville, Ky.
Among the new and important fea
tures of the new agreement is pro
vision for a vacation with pay of five
days during the summer season, and
an additional five days’ bonus pay at
Christmas. A strictly union agree
ment it is, with full seniority rights
provided. Time and one-half will be
paid under this agreement for all over
time, in addition to the regular as
signed bonus. Further privsion is
made that all time worked between
noon on Saturdays and regular work
ing time Monday mornings, includ
ing holidays, will be paid for at the
double-time rate of pay.
Organized five years ago, this Lo
cal Union has obtained many wage in
creases, bringing thew age rate now
to 96 cents an hour, while pay for the
specialists have been brought up to
80 cents an hour. These wage in
creases, plus to the greatly improved
conditions of labor which have been
obtained, prove the vast importance
that organization has been to the
workers during the past five years.
All members of the local union are
proud of the fact that these new
agreements from year to year, with
their manifold advancements in pay
and improvements in conditions, have
been obtained in the most agreeable
and pleasant manner, and tne com
pany officials have co-operated with
the Unions in every way. That is why
the membership takes such pride in
the work performed for the Brown &
Williamson Tobacco Company.
Union Carpenters
On New White
Housing Project
The carpenters have a contract with
V. P. Loftis, contractor on the new
white Federal Housing Project for
union men. Business Agent J. C. How
er, of Carpenters Local No. 1469, re
ports that Mr. Loftis has been very
fair to all the crafts in the building
trades. Many members of the build
ing trades have been placed on this
project.
Business Agent Hower reports much
progress in signing of new union jobs
for his craft.
Subscribe For the Journal
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CHARLOTTE 11 Fri.-S«t.~l
RECKLESS ADVENTURE ON THE HIGH SEAS!
“Rulers of the Sea”
with
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Margaret Lockwood
Monday - Tuesday
“DESTRY RIDES AGAIN”
Marlene Dietrich - Janies Stewart
Conventions Held
Southern States
A. F. of L Bodies
JOHNSON IS ELECTED
PRESIDENT GEORGIA
FEDERATION OF LABOR
MACON, Ga., May 6.—Georgia's
42nd annual convention of the State
Federation of Labor met here last
week and took action on many matters
of importance to the Labor Movement.
The Convention Committee appointed
by the Macon Central Labor Union
performed a marvelous job in ^taking
preparations for the convention. Dew
ey L. Johnson, President of the At
lanta Federation of Trades, was
elected president of the Georgia Fed
eration of Labor.
Miss Allie B. Mann, of Atlanta, was
chosen secretary and treasurer, and
J. 0. Morgan, of Macon, was named
delegate to the hext A. F. of L. na
tional convention.
TENNESSEE FEDERATION TO
CONVENE IN MEMPHIS SOON
MEBMPHIS, Tenn., May 6.—Of
ficial call for the 43rd annual conven
tion of the Tennessee State Federa
tion of Labor has been issued, to meet
in Memphis, with Peabody Hotel as
headquarters, on Monday, June 3, and
remain in daily session until the bus
iness of the organization shall have
been completed. Memphis Trades Un
ionists are quoted in The Memphis
Labor Review as having expressed
determination to make this the largest
and most successful State Federation
of Labor convention ever held in the
Volunteer State. Secretary-Treasurer
T. R. Cuthbert, from his office in
Chattanooga, has released informa
tion to the effect that credentials al
ready received from affiliated bodkft
indicate that it will be the larges
convention in the Federation’s history.
ALABAMA RE-ELECTS ROPER
AND HARE IN CONVENTION
GADEDEN, Ala., May 6.—People
of this city are still talking about the
constructive work done in the con
vention of the Alabama State Fed
eration of Labor, held here last month.
The large delegation, the splendid de
portment of the delegates, the serious
manner in which the convention went
about preparing and adapting a pro
gum the purpose of which wa< to
atf’mimw-tine besV LUeriMts ef-hlMIti
zens, constituted a real revelation to
the public of thiB city and section.
Secretary-Treasurer W. O. Hare, who
suffered severe injuries in an auto
mobile accident a few weeks ago, could
not be present, yet the convention ex
pressed its edep affection for him by
suspending regular rules and re-elect
ing him for another year by acclama
tion on the first day of the sessions.
President S. E. Roper was re-elected,
as were all of the vice presidents with
but one exception.
fypo Auxiliary
Met With Mrs.
Luna On Monday
The Woman’s Typographical Auxil
ianr met with Mrs. Hearn, 329 Tran
quil Avenue last Monuday evening at
8 o’clock. Mrs. Davis and Mrs. Hearn
were nominated for delegates to the
convention in New Orleans,
.which meets in conjunction with the
I. T. U. convention in August; Mrs.
Stroupe and Mrs. Luna being named
as alternates. Ice cream and cakes
were served and the home was taste
fully decorated with cut flowers. Mrs.
Davis acted as joint hostess.
The next meeting will be the first
Tuesday in June, with Mrs. C. B.
Capps, Hawthorne Apartments on
Hawthorne Lane.
Southern Trucking
Co. Case To Be
Heard In Wash
ington, May 19th
Organizer H. L. McCrorie, of the
local Teamsters and Chauffeurs, in
forms The Journal that the Great
Southern Trucking Company case will
come before the National Labor Re
ylations Board, in Washington, on
May 16. Attorney Padway, for the
Teamsters and Chauffeurs, will han
dle the case in conjunction with an
A. F. of L. atotrney. This is an ap
peal to the board by the local Team
sters Union on a decision handed
down some time ago. This strike
has been on here for more than six
.rionths.
It is also reported that the Team
sters will have an agreement with the
A. & P. concern within the next week.
Organizer McCrorie was in Wash
ington on business connected with his
local tH first of the week.
AFL Leader
Warns Of
Fascism Here
WASHINGTON.—“ Solve
the unemployment problem in
the United States or there will
be a Fascist government
here,” President George Har
rison of the AFL Brother
hood of Railway Clerks told
the Federal monopoly commit
tee today.
“I am not here to wave a
red flag or be an alarmist, but
I try to be a realist,” said Har
rison to the startled commis
sioners.
He told how 622,426 rail
workers had lost their jobs
through technological im
provements and speedup since
1921.
“Economic stresses from
such things as this create re
sentment and confusion which
dictators in other countries
khavi used to establish them
selves,” Harrison said.
“Call For Cotton
When You Buy”—
Cotton Week Slogan
NORFOLK, May 7.—“Call for Cot
ton When You Buy” is to be the slo
gan of National Cotton Week, May
17-24, Thos. P. Thompson, managing
director, Southeastern Chain Store
Council, said today, in announcing that
all chain stores in Virginia, Georgia,
and the Carolinas would co-operate
in every way possible in this nation
wide campaign.
This special sales campaign, he ex
plained, is sponsored by chain stores
each year in an effort to help cotton
farmers of the South by increasing
the use of cotton goods.
“All stores—food stores as well as
those regularly selling cotton goods—
will ‘push cotton’ in their advertis
ing and sales promotions during the
campaign,” Mr. Thompson declared.
Besides bringing American consum
ers standout cotton values, he stated
that the increased sales resulting from
this Cotton Consumption Campaign
will give important aid to King Cot
ton’s 12,000,000 dependentst in meet
ing their surplus emergency.
STELZLE APPRECIATES JOURNAL’S
EFFORTS; UNDERSTANDS SITUATION
THE A.F.L LABOR PRESS IS FACING
A famous writer recognizes what a Labor paper is up
against and writes The Journal the following, which we
publish without comment:
CHARLES STELZLE
S12 FIFTH AVENUE
NEW YORK CITY
April 30, 1940.
Mr. W. M. Witter )
The Charlotte Labor Journal
201Y* South College Street
Charlotte, North Carolina
Dear Mr. Witter:
I want you to know that 1 appreciate the way in which you hare
been printing my article*. Letters from many sources express the con
viction that the articles are helping to break down class prejudice and
build up the spirit of Democracy upon which the permanence and pros
perity of our country rests.
I read The Charlotte Labor Journal very carefully, and as I am
fairly familiar with your field, I can understand something of the
situation you are facing.
If at any time I can serve you in a special way, don’t hesitate to
call on me.
Fraternally yours,
CHARLES STELZLE.
Dr. Stelzle, carries a Machinist union card, and konws the
trials, tribulations, viscissitudes of a Union Man, and has
the power his versatile pen to paint word pictures that have
done great good for the workers, the Church and the preser
vation of our national ideals.
UNION RAYON WORKERS AT ENKA
ARE MAKING RAPID PROGRESS;
CLAIMS A. OF F. L. HAS MAJORITY
ASHEVILLE. N. C., May 6.—In
this Mountain Metropolis where many
busy-bodies line up in every fight
against Organized Labor, the hereto
fore impregnable position of the
American-Enka Rayon Corporation is
being challenged by the local union of
Enka Rayon Workers. This big in
stitution is headed by a group of Hol
land manufacturers who would, it is
believed by labor officials, be most
fair in their dealings with their em
ployes if left alone. But the way the
company started its big operations
more than a decade ago laid the foun
dation for the misunderstandings now
existing. Some Asheville men led the
company officials to believe « that
working people in Western North
Carolina do not want organization,
and just to “protect these workers
against any invasion of imported la
bor organizers,” the company was led
to establish a kind of an armed guard
about the premises.
upon repeated requests Dy em
ployes of the Enka Corporation, many
efforts were made to establish local
unions at Enka, but the armed guards
made such an undertaking almost im
possible. After the Wagner Labor
Relations Act had been passed, and
then the United States Supreme Court
placed its stamp of approval upon the
Act, the workers no longer were
afraid of the armed forces about the
place. Last September a Local Un
ion was organized, with L. D. Warren,
president of the Asheville Central
Labor Union, and Vice-President
Ingle, of the N. C. State Federation
of Labor, both Asheville boys, assist
ing the Enka workers in forming the
Union. In fact, the entire Labor
movement of Asheville aided the
Enka Workers in their organiza
tion.
Officials of the company commit
ted acts that were, in the opinion of
the workers, in violation of the law,
and charges were filed some time ago
against the company. Hearings have
just been completed and the evidence
of such violations as charged was
overwhelming, so much so that the
New York lawyer imported into Ashe
ville that always butts into labor con
troversies. L. James Johnson, A. F.
of L. Organizer in charge of the Enka
situation, stated publicly here last
Thursday night in the courthouse that
the Union now has an overwhelming
majority of the employes as members,
and is ready to go into an election at
any time.
Organization of the Enka workers
into a Local Union affiliated with the'
American Federation of Labor means
that an end has been put to the soft
jobs of several political henchmen
who have kept the officials of the
Enka Corporation deceived ever since
.the plant was built and operations
I began. That is one reason why so
Secretary Wallace
Endorses The Wage
There are indications that the Wage
and Hour law has worked to the det- I
riment of farmers, Secretary of Ag-'
riculture Henry A, Wallace declared
tonight in a nation-wide broadcast
over the NBC Blue network.
The program, in the form of an ex
change of opinion between Secretary
Wallace and Colonel Philip B. Flem
ing, administrator of the Wage and
Hour Division of the United States
Department of Labor, was arranged
by The Washington Star’s Radio
Forum. (
Secretary Wallace expressed the
opinion that some farmers, who have
opposed the Wage and Hour law,
have been “misled” by political
spokesmen for “certain interests.” He
asserted that farm incomes and the
incomes of industrial workers rise to
gether, and pointed out that in 1939,
when the Wage and Hour law was in
effect, farmers received approximately
10 per ment more for their fruit and
vegetables than in the crop season of
®e*ore tl** law became effective.
The Secretary warned that farmers
and industrial workers have a gen
uine community of interest and as
serted that each should work for the
other’s protection.
ONE TOO MANY
Judge: What caused the accident?
was the road m a wet conditon?
Witness: No, but the driver was.
SOME OF THE THINGS
WE LEND MONET ON
and Hour Law
All Business Strictly Confi
dent*''!. When in Need of ;
Money We Nerer Fail
Ton
Reliable Loan Co.
121 E. TRADE ST.
(Next to Bdk*a)
many people in Asheville have batted
into something that is none of their
business, in any sense of the word.
The Enka Local Union is destined to
become one of the most powerful in
fluences for Labor’s advancement in
this Mountain Metropolis, and when
an agreement has been signed by the
Company and the Union, Enka can
dispense with its expensive armed
guards and political henchmen. The
Union is just as deeply interested in
the success of Enka as is the manage
ment.
WHO'S WHO
IN UK. INS
r
EDW. J. WINTER
EDWARD J. WINTER
Edward J. Winter, Preaidant of
the Stove Mounters* International
Union, has been a member of his
Union since 1911. He was elected
Vice President in 1929 and became
inaeident at JJer* ntera*
International Union m 1988.
Mr. Winter has been one of
most progressive leaders in
Labor Union movement. He
constantly kept in step with
technological progress of tbs
dustry.
In addition to stove mounters
the membership of the Interna
tional Union includes enamelers,
assemblers and fabricators
of stoves and parts.
His address is: Mr. Edward J.
Winter, President, Stove Mounters'
International Union. 603 North
Third Street, Belleville, Illinois.
mu
STOVE MOUNTERS’ LABEL
The Union Label of the Stove
Mounters’ International Union was
adopted in 1898. This Label is
granted only to manufacturers
who operate strictly Union shops.
Label is attached to the oven bot
tom of cook stoves, ranges, and to
ash pit of base burners, furnaces,
and to heaters. The Label is print
ed in blue and indicates that this
product is made by Union labor.
For further' information regard
ing Union Labels, Shop Cards and
Service Buttons write Mr. I. M.
Omburn, Secretary-Treasurer, Un
ion I.abel Trades Department,
An -riean Federation of La)>or
Bui.ding, Washington, D. C.
It Pays to Trade With
Doggett
Lumber Co.
ill E. Park Ave. Phone SIT*
    

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