North Carolina Newspapers

    The ONLY REALLY INDEPENDENT WEEKLY fm Meckleabarg Ceim*
h*
the LARGEST BUYING POWER la
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Lite Union; standing far
the A. F. of L.
Chr Charlotte labor Journal
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VOL. X—NO. 5
CHARLOTTE, N. C., THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1940
$2.00 Per Y«
PRES. GREEN JOYFUL OVER RETURN
OF 1NT. LADIES GARMENT WORKERS;
HOPES FOR EARLY RETURN OF I. T. U.
NEW YORK.—William Green, I
president of the American Federation!
of Labor, literally danced for joy with
David Dukinsky last week over the re- (
turn of the International Ladies Gar
ment Workers union to the A. F. of
L. and asserted he was “standing with
arms outstretched’ ’to welcome other
C. I. 0. unions into his fold.
His next dancing partner, he in
timated at the I. L. G. W. U. conven
tion, might be Claude Baker, chieftain
If VC VIISUUV • • ---7
of the International Typographical
on, which was suspended for re
union, _
fusing to pay a per capita tax to
fight C. I..O. Inasmuch as Green as
sured the garment workers that elim
ination of the tax would be recom
mended to the A. F. of L. convention
it was reasonable to conclude, he said,
that the 86,000-member typographical
union would return to good standing.
He predicted that the return of the
250,000 garment workers—the conven
tion last week voted to reaffiliate—
would "launch a movement in other
fields bringing the rank and file back
into the federation.’’
The I. L. G. W. U. left the A. F. L.
to join the C. I. O. and then dropped
out of the latter in November, 1938,
to operate as an independent.
Green also told the convention that
he believed the present “national
emergency” would lead to an end of
the division in the labor movement,
and said he personally would do ev
erything in his power to “heal the
breach.”
“The American Federation of Labor
peace committee is ready to meet in
a conference room, anywhere, any
place, and at any time, in an effort
to recement 'the ranks of labor,” he
declared. “I make this statement
without any reservation.”
Referring to charges of union rack
eteering, Green said he was willing
to match “the 4,000,000 members of
the A. F. L. for morality, honesty, and
good citizenship with any other 4,
000,000 in America.”
This, he added, did not relieve the
A. F. L. from ousting from its ranks
those seeking to exploit their connec
tion with later.
Dubinsky, who has headed the I. L.
G. W. U. since 1932, was re-elected
president, and Luigi Antonini, state
chairman of the American Labor par
ty, was re-elected first vice-president.
AFL OPPOSES FEDERAL
APPROPRIATIONS CUT
WASHINGTON, D. C.—Strong op
position to the announced intention of
Senator Byrd of Virginia to force a
ten per cent cut in all Federal appro
priation* was voiced by the American
Federation of Labor.
In a telegram to all members of the
Senate, President Green declared such
action would be wholly unwise.
“ROBERT” NOT SPEAKING
OF A. F. OF L. UNIONS IN
HIS SABOTAGE RESOLUTION
WASHINGTON, June 11.—Assert
ing that sabotage and propaganda ef
forts are being attempted in key
American industries, Senator Rey
nolds, Democrat of North Carolina,
introduced a resolution Monday to bar
Communists, Nazis, Fascists, aliens,
and felons from serving as labor un
ion officers and agents.
Back Home Again 250,000 Strong
Picture shows William Green, President of American
Federation of Labor (right), and David Dubinsky, president
of International Ladies* Garment Workers Union. They
played outstanding roles as I.L.G.W.U., 250,000 strong, re
turned to the Federation after a period in the C.I.O. and
subsequently as an independent.
THE MARCH Of LABOR
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ANA AIVOTKM LAIO TIM FOUND
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Charlotte, Queen City
In Reality, Enters
Into 100,000 Class
Triumphantly Charlotte enters the
cream of society, in fact it is the Queen
.WHO'S. WHO
IN UNIONS
D. J. TOBIN
D.J. TOBIN
Daniel J. Tobin, President of the
International Brotherhood of
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen
and Helpers of America, has been
a member of his Union since 1900.
He was elected to his present posi
tion in 1907. He has been a mem
ber of the Executive Council of
the American Federation of Labor
since 1917.
Mr. Tobin is one of the most ag
gressive leaders in the American
Labor movement. He has been
in increasing the mem
«t his Upfcm until it is one
in America.
_ from
Federation «i La
ta the British Trades Union
19U and in 19S8. Ha
to the later
al Trade Da
te too Third_
i in Mexico Cttg to :
His address is: Mr. D. J. TObfa,
of the emblem of the Teemstera'
Union. This Emblem or the
Monthly Working Button indice tee
that the Chauffeur or Teamster
you employ is a member in coed
UNION LABEL OF THE INTL
BRO. OF T.CL8. AND H.
OF AMERICA
For further information retard
ing Union Labels. Shop Cards and
Service Buttons write Mr. I. M.
Ornburn, Secretary-Treasurer, Un
ion Label Trades Department,
American Federation of Labe*
Building, Washington, D. C.
Pres. Graham
Will Keep U. N. C.
“Open and Free”
RALEIGH, June 8.—Chargee that
radicalism and “wildcat freedom ex
fated at the Chapel Hill unit of the
Greater University of North Caro
lina were aired yesterday at a stormy
session of the university’s board of
trustees. ,, . ,
At the climax of > torrid debate,
Prank P. Graham Cold the trustees
that as Ions as he was president of
the university, he was going to keep
it "open and free.” He added that he
did not wish to be connected with the
university if the trustees thought that
such a policy was “perverting.”
Quickly, many members of the
board—including Josephus Daneils of
Raleigh, U. S. ambassador to Mexico
—rallied to the defense of Dr. Gra
ham and his administration.
City of the Carolinas, as far as popu
lation goes, and in every other way
for that matter. The hundred thou
sand mark has been well passed, and
The Journal feels that each and every
citizen did his or her part in seeing
the goal attained that puts us in the
plutocratic class. From Chief Enum
erator Nat C. White; Dr. R. F. Hol
land, acting census supervisor, the
enumerators; the press as a whole,
and Secretary Clarence Kuester, of
the C. of C., on down* the line, Char
lotte owes a debt for perseverance and
pluck that pulled us out of the slough
of despond, for had Charlotte not
reached that goal, its citizens would
have had another sorrow along with
the discouraging news that’s reaching
us at the present time. So it’s All
Hail to Charlotte,” the Queen City of
the Carolinas,
Unofficial Summary
Of Int Typo Union
Slows Baker Elected
INDIANAPOLIS.—An unofficial
summary of complete official returns
showed the re-election of Claude M.
Baker, of San Francisco, as president
>f the International Typographical
Union.
This summary, issued by Woodruff
Randolph, secretary-treasurer, gave
Baker 30.854 vote* t*r 28,487 for-his
opponent, Francis G. Barrett, of New
York Cit*.
The unofficial totals show re-elec
tion of Randolph with 29,521 votes to
9,162 for John J. Conley, of Fort
Worth, Texas, and election of Jack
Gill, of Cleveland, as first vice-presi
lent, and Thomas Holland, of Van
couver, British Columbia, as second
/ide-president.
Others whose election was indicated
sy the unofficial tally:
Jesse L. Boyle, of Erie, Pa., Ed
win C. McEntee, of Washington, D.
C., John Simons, of New York, Char
es F. Stephens, of Seattle, and Glenn
L. Mitchell, of Indianapolis, delegates
:o American Federation of Labor.
Charles M. Lyon, of Lynn, Mass.,
agent of the union printers’ home at
Colorado Springs.
J. Cliff Kane, of Louisville, William
R. Lucas, of Toronto, and George Bal
linger, Jr., of Pittsburgh, trustee of
the home.
William R. Trotter, of Vancouver,
delegate to the Trades and Labor con
gress of Canada. ‘
Joseph M. Tobin, of New York,
-joard of auditors.
Twelve Votes Ag’inst
A. F. of L Affiliation
Called Communists
NEW YORK,—The twelve dele
gates who voted against immediate
eaffiliation of the Ladies’ Garment
Workers were denounced by Mr.
Dubinsky as Communists. He excon
ited them for placing the dictates of
he Communist Party above the wishes
■>f the workers they were elected to
represent . , . _ . _
The motion to rejoin the A. F. of L.
evoked a wild demonstration. The
head of the C. I. 0. was characterized
as “a very pig-headed man” and he
was bitterly assailed for blocking la
bor peace negotiations in discussion
on the motion.
D. S. CAN ADD 50,000
AIR PILOTS WITHIN YEAR
WASHINGTON, D. C.—If the nec
essity arises, America can train 50,
000 air pilots from the armed forces
during the next year, according to
Robert H. Hinckley, chief of the Civil
Aeronautics Authority.
This enormous backlog of potential
military flyers can be created with
out “any loss of efficiency or safety,”
Hinckley contended. (They’ll be
needed, and more before long.)
A. A. BERLE RESIGNS FROM
NATIONAL LAWYERS GUILD;
COMMUNISM IS SCENTED
WASHINGTON, D. C.—A. A.
Berle, Jr., Assistant Secretary of
State, resigned from the National
Lawyers Guild and from the District
Columbia Chapter of the Guild be
muse, he said, the Guild “is not pre
pared to take any stand which con
flicts with the Communist party line.”
PATRONIZE THOSE
WHO ADVERTISE IN
JOURNAL
THE “QUEEN CITY OF THESOUTH”
HAS HIGHEST MURDER RATE OF
ANY CITY ITS SIZE m THE U. S.
Queen Charlotte — church-going,
bone-dry, Sunday movie-less regent of
the Carolines — is grabbing off a
sizeable batch of national publicity
this week because of its penchant for
murder.
In the Sunday, June 9 issue of the
New York Daily News, on Charlotte
newstands this week, appears a story
under .the -heading -“Church-Going
Charlotte is High in Murder” which
tells of this city’s murder rate, de
scribes it in the first four months of
1940 as “off to a good start to keep
its place among cities with the high
est percentage of murders.”
The Sunday Daily News has the
largest circulation of any newspaper
in the United States.
Movement Dies
It points out that the city doesn’t
tolerate Sunday movies or baseball.
Agitation for less strict “blue laws”
seems to have died down again here
after Councilman Herbert H. Baxter’s
proposal was voted down over a week
ago.
The Daily News story is as follows:
Charlotte, N. C., June 7.—Char
lotte, which claims to be one of
the greatest church-going cities
in the world, is off to i good start
this year to keep its place among
cities with the highest percent
age of murders.
On a per capita population
basis, Charlotte is right up with
Chicago, New York and the other
crime-fa mous cities in the United
States.
The city tolerates neither legal
liquor, Sunday movies or Sunday
baseball.
But, during the first four
months of 1940, there were twelve
killings within the city limits,
practically all of them involving
colored peopde. Of this number
however, the po lice de partment
cleared nine of the cases with
arrests.
There were 35 murders during
1939—more than the whole of
England—and of this number
only sixteen were cleared.
Charlotte’s murder record has
given the city quite a bit of
publicity, in view of its boast it’s
the greatest church-going city.
The First Baptist Church alone
has 3,000 members.—Charlotte
News.
LIBERTY AT STAKE!
BY CHARLES STELZLE
(Member International Association of Machinists)
MWMMMMwyWMMywuyMMyyuuyyyuk*
To most of us liberty is a priceless heritage. We have gloried
in our freedom, but some of us have forgotten the price with
which our freedom was purchased. We have enjoyed liberty an
though it were a gift which carried with it no obligation, and we
have been reckless spendthrifts of our inheritance.
It seems a great bore to stand when the band plays “The Star
Spangled Banner,” forgetting that it represents that for which
“our fathers died . . . . land of the pilgrim's pride,” wheyeas we
should feel like jumping to our feet and waving our arms, with tears
in our eyes, because W what “Old Glory” means to us. This may
seem a bit hysterical, but the whole world is on the verge of a great
catastrophe which may vastly affect our own country.”
While we have been enjoying liberty without' disclipline, the
people in the totalitarian countries have been subjected to discipline
without liberty. They have been systematically hardened for brutal
combat while we hav* been softened through indifference, self-in
dulgence and sheer laziness. The virtues which dominated the
fathers ofeur counts,, who through great sacrif f-,r us the
freeSon Ttd jiherfS« t-iicfc we sKH enjoy, have bi. n replaced by
sOpkfntfchtion and wise-cracking «wt use are permitting crackpots
and irresponsible agitators f* Tnsnlt our constitution and ridicule'" '
our form of government.
We have supinely accepted teachers of subversive doctrines from
abroad, viewed with inulgence leaders of movements who frankly
declared that they are trying to create class hatred and race preju
dice in our midst, and condoned politicians who are too spineless to
protest against those who are boldly laying the foundations for our
destruction. The same tactics indulged in in the countries which
they hold as idealistic would send them to a concentration camp or
before a firing squad.
When sudh enemies of our country flaunt their contempt in our
faces, the time has come for every loyal American to stand up in his
wrath and speak out as a loyal citizen, particularly as we are now
confronting forces which threaten our future as a Republic of free"
men and women.
We have not attained the full glory which lies inherent in our
system of government, although we believe that we already have the
best form of government in the world. But we must vigorously
oppose those whose sole purpose is our destruction and humiliation,
lest we be subjected to the rule of those who are opposed to the prin
ciples of freedom and liberty which were bought at so great a price,
and which have made America the haven for the oppressed of other
nations.
...-i-h- rLnjVtnjuuuiJL
NEW DAILY TO GIVE LABOR A SQUARE DEAL
Leo Huberman, outstanding labor authority and author of “The t
Spy Racket ,” “Man’s Worldly Goods,” “We, the People,” and the forth
coming “Americ*; Incorporated,” has ben appointed labor editor of PM,
New York’s new newspaper which will appeare in mid-June, it is announced
by Ralph Ingersoll.-PM’s editor.
With the appointment of Huberman, PM is prepared to begin a new
policy in American journalism; giving labor the space and treatment It de
serves. Because PM aims to be a complete newspaper containing all the
news that is news, without benefit of paid advertising, it will institute
many new methods in coverage, and especially in news about the working
population of America.
How important PM deems labor is shown by the fact that two of its
32 pages will be given exclusively to the subject. This is more space thf"
any other non-labor paper has ever devoted to labor.
Membership of A. F. L. Exceeds 4,500,000
WASHINGTON, D. C.—Member
ship in the American Federation of
Labor leaped to a new all-time peak
with the re-admittance of the 250,000
members of the International Ladies’
Garment Workers Union, Secretary
Treasurer George Meany announced.
The dues-paid membership, includ
ing the members fo the I.L.G.W.U.,
now exceeds 4,600,000, it was offi
cially stated. A drive is under way
to bring the dues-paid membership up
to 6,000,000 by the time of the next
A. F. of L. convention-in November.
CHARLOTTE |
FRIDAY - SATURDAY
in A CAGNEY YOU’VE NEVER SEEN BEFORE...THAT YOU’LL WANT TO SEE AGAM!
OKLAHOMA KID
tT CUtiAKl •HOitMflfiT LANE • whulo ctisp ■
Hllllll
Monday-Tuesday
“My Little Chickadee”
W. C. Fields
Mae West
Wednesday-Thursday
“Five Little Peppers
and How They Grew”
Edith Fellows
    

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