North Carolina Newspapers

    The Charlotte Labor Journal
AND DIXIE FARM NEWS
M2 South Colic** Street—(Second Floor)
PHONE S-3094
btmd u Mond-etiM mtiur. HwUorr 11. 1M1. tl the Poet Office M CoiMh. N. 0
adar the Act of March I. 1ST*
W. M. WITTER___-.-.Editor and Publisher
CLAUDE L. ALBEA.-._„Asuod*t* Editor
CHARLOTTE, N. C., THURSDAY, JULY 4, 1940
Every Day Is FLAG DAY
“WHEN IN THE COURSE OF HUMAN
EVENTS”
BY CHARLES STELZLE
(Member International Association of Machinists)
Fourth of July speeches ring wtih the proud declaration that while
we are a “young” nation, we are the greatest nation on earth. But
in the enthusiasm of the orators to emphasize our youth, they usu
ally overlook the fact that next to England, we are the oldest gov
ernment on earth.
We have maintained our form of government throughout our his
tory in spite of the fact that we have it within our power to change
it any time we may wish to do so. There is no firing squad, no
concentration camp, no police force of any kind which may prevent
us from doing so if we follow the orderly procedure which our Con
v stitutioa has laid down. There is absolutely no need for the use
of violence. All we need to do is to have the citizens of the United
States declare their wishes through the ballot box. But—instead
of trying to find some other form of government we are today more
firmly resolved than we ever were to maintain its present form.
Meanwhile thee hanges in the form of government in countries
overseas have been kaledioscopic. In nearly every case they have
taken place as the result of wars or revolutions. Since the United
States was born 150 years ago, practically every nation in the
world has gone through one or more changes. The world is today
in the midst of a “total war" which will bring other changes, the
nature of which no man can prophecy.
Those who are agitating for Communism. Facism, Nazism, and
other forms of government, should borrow instead from our phil
osophy of government which, in the face of modern problems in
a modern world, has stood the test of a century and a half. Then
the world would see arising out of the present turmoil in F.urope
the miracle of a “United States of Europe,” comparable to our
own country in its form of government.
To achieve this world Democracy it would be necessary to adopt
the profound and far-reaching principle that “all men are created
equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalien
able rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of
happiness.” Implied in this revolutionary but natural form of gov
ernment is the abolition of all distinctions due to race, creed, color,
or economic condition. These principles date back to the very be
ginning of time. No power on earth can abr&gate them, and peace
on earth will not prevail until they are universally accepted, for
they are plainly the will of the Creator of all mankind.
ANNOUNCING
NEW LOCATION
SELWYN CUT RATE DRUG STORE
DISTINCTIVE FOUNTAIN SERVICE
125 W. TRADE ST.
I
Pittsburgh Plats Blass Co.
BY WILKIE’S WORKS YE SHALL KNOW HIM
Not by his words but by his works we must judge the Presi
dential aspirations of Wendell Wilkie, Wall Street’s candidate for
the Republican ticket for President.
Now that Wilkie is the Republican nominee, let ns take a peep at
this man who looms go large upon the political horizon.
He is the head of the Commonwealth and Southern Utilities Cor
poration. This is a Morgan concern. It has holdings from North
Carolina to the Middle Western States. This Corporation has been
the most bitter and outspoken of all the enemies ofthe New Deal, and
Wendell Wilkie has been the brawn and' brains of the outfit.
Mr. Wilkie is an attractive and beguiling personality. In the •
PWt.f** months he has written a great deal, particularly for liberal
publications, on Civil Liberties and democracy. No one has in recent
years written and spoken on these paramount issues with more
clarity and vigor than Wendell Wilkie. From his printed and spoken
words we gather he is a firm believer in upholding Civil Liberties and
our democratic way of life. But— But—
Let us see what his works have been. The Corporation which he
heads has been among the worst in the country in denying Civil
Liberties to others. It was responsible for the death of a daily Chat
tanooga newspaper (by setting up an opposition paper and by getting
practically all advertising for its new subservient paper) which had
publicly fought for TV A and against Wilkie’s Commonwealth and
Southern. This Corporation in its treatment of its employees has
been a dose second to the Republic Steel Company.
And we laboring people are not so foolish as to think for one sec
ond that J. P. Morgan and Company would have selected Mr. Wilkie
to head or would have kept him at the head of Commonwealth and
Southern if Mr. Wilkie’s views of our economic and political life,
of our democracy and Civil Liberties, were not the same as the
reactionary men who compose this Morgan firm.
And labor wants none of them or of their satellites.
And labor does not intend to be fooled either by an engaging
smile or a “wordy” defense of democracy.
We measure Wendell Wilkie by the yardstick of his works, and
his works have been bad.—Norfolk (Va.) Labor Journal.
DoifrSKSS
ABOUT 1940 REFRIGERATOR VALUES
BIG 6
«y4 Cm. Ft
KELVMATOR
EASY TERMS
KELVINATOR
COME in and sec it
Full 6V« cubic foot
size . . . finished in gleam
ing Permalux outside, with
Porcelain-on-steel cabinet
interior, cold storage tray,
automatic light 84-cube
freezing capacity, and
many other features.
It's powered by the
famed Polarsphere sealed
unit . . . that uses current
less than 20% of the time,
and has sufficient capacity
to keep 5 refrigerators
cold, under average house
hold conditions.
And it’s just one of the
amazing values in the New
1940 Kelvinator line. Big
• and 8 cubic foot models.
See our complete line —
ask for the new book—
“The 1940 Refrigerator
Guide.
) SPECIAL OFFER
$10 CASH mm
I V wn BALANCE
IN 24 MONTHS
I
LMm In WBT 9:45 P. M. Tues., Fri. and Sat,
WSOC 12:40 P. M. dally Except Sunday
POWER COMPANY
430 South Church St. Phone 4112
PATRON]
E
JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
GRADE‘A' HU |£
PASTEURIZED ItIII_I\ ftyumt
/ 3*2153
BJLTMORE DAIRY FARMS
OP&i TO WSfTOfiS
ywvi Ai/sncuTAn tr
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Martin's Dept. Store
RELIABLE MERCHANDISE ALWAYS
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OUR NEW STORE NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS WITH A COMPLETE STOCK OP SPRING AND SUMMER
MERCHANDISE.
IT HAPPENS EVERYWHERE j
The other day we were reading some of the Labor publications that
come to the editorial desk. As our eyes glanced through their pages
this or that item attracted our attention and they finally became
focused upon the following ail too often true bit of information in
the “New Jersey Labor World,” which read:
“UNION CARD!
“Among men I am a symbol of unity, the diploma of skill; all
Workers of the world, whether within or without the ranks of Or
ganised Labor, have received the benefits I have bestowed on man
kind. I have made free men of serfs and converts of doubters.
Being of a retiring nature, I keep most of my business to myself.
I hear, I see and I feel, but sometimes I wish I could talk. For in
the past I have lain in the pockets of suits fashioned by the fingers
that have signed yellow-dog contracts; next to cigarettes produced
by Labor that sells itself for 10 cents per hour; adjacent to haber
dashery bought in stores whose proprietors rebuke Organized Labor
and its press; cluose to combs intimately acquanted with barber
college haircuts.
“Yet I have heard the very men in whose pockets I am carried
condemn low wages and blame the depression on politics.”
Yea, Brother, we have similar “Card Toters” right here in
Charlotte, so geographically location seems to make little differ
ference in the inclination for some Unionists to blow “hot” on the
card sbbject and in almost the same breath blow “cold” on the
“Uinon Made” or “Union Label” question.
wjUnsnsnnnsnnnnwmnnnmwmmwwuwuuwowmmwwvvmwvmn
The Fifth Column Worker
By H. L PHILLIPS
HE TAKES all America has to
offer with a smile and awaits a
chance to return the favor with a
machine cun.
HE COILS in the flag, hides in
the quartet singing the national
anthem and crouches behind the
Bill of Rights.
HE ACCEPTS your invitation
to dinner and makes a mental
blueprint of your home so he can
return and snatch the silver.
HE LETS you, help him on with
his coat while he plans to steal
your shirt.
HE LETS you pay his golf fee
while he figures out how much
powder it would take to blow up
the clubhouse.
• • •
HE BECOMES your week-end
house guest and spends most of
the time estimating how good a
target for bombers the children’s
bedroom would make.
HE APPLAUDS America First
programs and laughs himself to
sleep over the fact his face didn’t
betray him.
HE STANDS when “The Star
Spangled Banner’’ is played, but
eases his conscience by assuring
himself that he was tired of sit
ting, anyhow.
HE LOOKS like a man, but I
performs like a rattlesnake.
HE SHAKES your hand while
his wandering eye measures you
for a knife in the back.
HE IS THE SKUNK that walks
like a man, the hyena that
waltzes like a patriot and the rat
that masquerades as a human
being.
HE EXPRESSES astonishment
at the genius of American indus
try, but puts in plenty of time
reporting back to the enemy on
weak spots for attack.
HE NOT ONLY BITES the
hand that feeds him, but eats the
other hand lor dessert.
HE SAYS, ‘‘It can’t happen
here,” while planning to help the
enemy do it.
• • •
HE IS THE KIND of rodent
who would accept help from the
good Samaritan, ask the Samari
tan to wait for him in the corner
drug stdre and then bomb the
drug store.
HE RENDERS evil for good,
thinks the doublecross is the
noblest work of man and eats
with his knife because he never
wants to have to depend on a fork
when the time comes to stab his
host.
PATRONIZE JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
■ ‘ '• ' 1
The Children’s Party! ^
It does not take a treat deal of
time to prepare for a successful
children's party. The coat ta small
when compared to that expended
on festivities for adults.
Bat it is necessary to choose the
foods wisely. * If the party is held
in the afternoon, tha children will
probably eat a hearty dinner at
home.; If it is an early even in*
party, the hearty dinner has been
eaten already. In either case the
fooda served should be light, easily
digested, and in fairly moderate
portions. Then the party will be
an enjoyable affair, without any
lamentable after effects.
Serve simple, light sandwiches,
fruit juice or milk, a small portion
of birthday cake and a light dessert
with ornamental cookies. Devote
the rest of your party appropriation
to table decorations, games and
attractively wrapped, inexpensive
“mystery” prises. Children react
to attractive visible things and
mystgrions hidden things. Bear this
in miffd as you plan.
Let the light dessert dish be the
main dish. Something like a
healthful rennet-custard Is ideal.
It’s easy to prepare in advance,
healthful, easily digested and liked
by all.- The following recipe will
furnish you with Just what the
children want. No eggs are needed.
No baking or trailing are necessary.
In attractive orange baskets, and
served with small animal or “de- »
sign” cookies bearing the na'jea of
the guests, these desserts are a
sore party “hit.”
Chocolate Rennet-Custard in
Orange Baskets
3 large oranges
I pint milk (not canned or soft
curd)
1 package chocolate rennet powder
Cut oranges carefully into halves
in the usual way, squeeze the juice
out, and remove membranes from
shells. To make handles, cut a
strip around the top of each half
shell about % inch wide, leaving it
attached for about % inch on oppo
site sides. Lift up the strips and
tie together with a ribbon, t
Warm milk slowly, stirring < in
stantly. Test a drop on inside of
wrist frequently. When COMFORT
ABLY WARM, (120* F.) not hot,
remove at once from stove. Stir
rennet powder into milk briskly
until dissolved — not over one
minute. Pour at once, while stilll
liquid, into the orange baskets. Do
not move until firm — about It
minutes. Chill in refrigerator.
Yield: < desserts. .
    

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