North Carolina Newspapers

    DEFENSE LEVY NOW IN EFFECT;
MERCHANTS UNCERTAIN WITH
CHANGE; TAX FOR FED. DEFENSE
RALEIGH, July 2.—North Caro
linians, who have become accustomed
to shelling out odd pennies with each
purchase to pay the state’s three per
cent skies tax, got their first taste
yesterday of another nuisance tax—
the federal defense levy.
Frankly befuddled, merchants ex
perimented with various price changes
in an attempt to pass the tax on to
the consumer. Some merchants, how
ever, held their prices firm and an
nounced they would absorb the taxes.
Gasoline at most service stations
advanced one-half cent a gallon, but
lubricating prices remained unchang
ed. Some merchants were selling
leading brands of cigarettes for as
high as 17 cents a package, and 10
cent cigarettes for 12 cents.
Some movie houses which had
charged 25 cents jumped prices to
28 cents; 35-cent houses increased to
39 cents; and 40-cent houses in
creased to 44 cents.
Stores which sold the cheaper
brands of beer for 10 cents were
charging 11 and 12 cents. Fifteen
cent beer still was selling for 15 cents
in some places, and for 16 cents in
others.
Prices in all state-controlled liquor
stores were increased 10 per cent.
Dollar-a-pint whiskey was selling for
$1.10.
Toilet preparations, automobiles,
radios, mechanical refrigerators,
matches, playing cards and electric
4, energy were other items affected by
the federal defense taxes.
Meat Cutters Bar
Nazis, Facists and
Reds From Its Body
MILWAUKEE, Wis. — More than
400 delegates attending the conven
tion of the Amalgamated Meat Cut
ters and Butcher Workmen of North
America, A. F. of L. affiliate, adopt
ed a resolution which provides that
“no one who does not believe in the
American form of government, or
who carries out instructions of a for
eign government, or belongs to a
Nazi, Fascist or Communist organiza
tion shall be eligible for membership
in the union.”
Patrick E. Gorman, international
president, in his report referred to
the growth of the organization as
having been the most phenomenal of
any of the A. F. of L. affiliates.
THE JOURNAL has by far;
the largest city circulation of
any weekly published in Char-!
lotte. Your ad in The Journal;
will bring results from the
workers.
246 FEDERAL CONTRACTS
INCLUDE 40-HOUR WEEK
WASHINGTON, D. C.—The five
day 40-hour week, prevailing wage
rates, extra pay for overtime and
other improved work conditions were
included in 246 contracts, valued at
$19,662,586 reported by 12 govern
ment agencies during the week end
ing June 15, according to the Depart
ment of Labor. The contracts were
phrased in accordance with the pro
visions of the Walsh-Heal'ey Public
Contracts Act, originally passed by
Congress through the influence of the
American Federation of Labor.
Ours would be a busy place if all
idle thoughts were put to work in the
right direction.
REX
RECREATION
AND BOWLING ALLEY
Where Union Me* Meet
I IB-1ST a TRTOOf ML
DeVONDE
Synthetic
CLEANERS — DYEF«
HATTERS — FURRIERS
SEVEN POINTS WHY WE ARB
ONE OF THE SOUTH’S LEAD
ING SYNTHETIC CLEANERS
1 Restore* original frashness and
sparkle.
2 Removes carefully all dirt, Best
and grease
3 Harmless to the most delicate
of fabrics.
4 Odorless, thoroegb cleaning
5 Garments .stag dean longer
< Preea retained Unger
7 Reduces wardrobe apkeep
CALL 3-S12S
304 N. Tryon St.
I Large electric companies in the
state apparently were preparing to
absorb the new levy.
As far as the general public was
concerned, the taxes had this effect:
it cost more to have a good time.
As an example of how -prices
varied popular brands of cigarettes
in Raleigh today ranged from 14 to
17 cents.
“I sell my cigarettes for 15 cents,”
one merchant said, “and then I add
one cent for sales tax and one cent
for the new federal tax. That's 17
cents.”
A customer pointed out that the
new tax was only half a cent.
“I know that, but unless I want
to pay that half-cent myself, I have
to charge you the whole cent,” the
merchant replied.
Owners of cigarette vending ma
chines said they had not decided
whether they would raise their prices.
The 10 - cent beer situation was
equally unsettled. Some cafe opera
tors said they had been charging 10
I cents a bottle, and absorbing the state
beer tax. In the future, they said,
they will charge 11 cents. Other op
erators said they planned to jump
prices to 12 cents.
Manufacturers of three brands of
cigarettes—which usually sell for 15
cents straight—said they would ob
1 sorb the new tax.
WHO'S WHO
IN UNIONS
C. C. COULTER
C. C. COULTER
C. C. Coulter, Secretary-Treas
urer of the Retail Clerks’ Interna
tional Protective Association, be
came a member of the Knights of
Labor in 1898. He became identi
fied with his present organization
in 1901 tnrough its affiliate, Local
No. 202 of Washington, D. C. He
held eyery office within the gift of
this Local. During the last ten
years of his activity in the Na
tional Capital he was Business
Agent for his organization.
Mr. Coulter was elected to the
office of President of his organiza
tion in 1926 and served in this
capacity for a period of one year.
In 1926 he was elected by the Gen
eral Executive Board of the Asso
ciation to the office of Secretavy
Treaf urer, and has been renamed
to this position by four successive
general elections.
Few men in the Labor movement
today have a record of such long
standing and active service as'
C. C. Coulter. Since becoming In
ternational Secretary-Treasurer he
has seen the membership of his
Association increase by more than
1,000 per cent. His organization
has risen from an insignificant
position to one of the ranking affili
ates of the American Federation
of Labor.
His address is: Mr. C. C. Coul
ter, Secretary-Treasurer, Retail
Clerks’ International Protective
Association, Lock Drawer 248, La
Fayette, Indiana.
RETAIL CLERKS’ STORE CARD
The Store Card of the Retail
Clerks’ International Protective
Association was adopted at the
Toledo, Ohio, convention on July
16, 1897. It is prominently dis
played in stores where only retail
clerks who are members of this
organization are employed. When
making purchases of Union Label
goods, insist that the clerk has a
membership card in this Associa
tion. The Store Card is printed
on a white background. It shows
the official emblem, centered on the
card, printed in rose and blue.
■The Retail Clerks’ Store Card is
granted only to those merchants
who employ Union clerks ex
clusively. The demand for this
Card means the employment* of
Union clerks who always advance
the sale of all Union Label prod
ucts. Insist upon the display of
the Store Card of the Retail Clerks’
International Protective Associa
tion.
For further information regard
ing Union Labels, Shop Cards and
Service Buttons, write Mr. L M.
Ornburn, Secretary-Treasurer,
Union Label Trades Department,
American Federation of Labor
Building, Washington, D, C.
Combating Fifth Column
On the Fourth
I
I
Not to Be Forced,
Nazi Officials Say
: J*U«M hUmte'lNfe;
i
j
j
•j
I
One year ago, on July 4,1939, the Reading (Pa.) Times came oat with
an edition that was “censored” as it would be if published under a
totalitarian government. The above is a reproduction of the front page.
Nearly everything on the page had to be “crossed” out. The edition
showed graphically what would be prohibited on the Fourth of July in
any newspaper published under Communism, Fascism, or Nazism. In the1
language of today, the Fourth of July edition was aimed at Fifth
activities.
PATRON]
E
JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
|
Jersey Cows Prefer Green Grass
To Rainbow Hues of World's Fair
THE green of new
spring gras* In their
miniature paature pro*
▼idee more of a thrill
for this herd of pure
bred “Creamline" Jer
sey cows than do the
rainbow Hues ana arcnuecturai
magnificence of the 1940 New York
World's Fair. That silo in the back
ground seems to impress them more
than the towering Trylon and Peri
sphere, theme buildings of the Fair,
looming on the horixon. And the
sight of the shiny electrical milk
ing machines stirs them more than
the whirring movie cameras that
filmed their arrival at the Electri
fied Farm, a major agricultural ex
hibit at the Fair
The purebred Jersey herd, which
will occupy the compact little dairy
pt the Fair until June 26, is really
a family affair The family is
headed by the Island of Jersey
grand champion bull, Rochette’s It
3730S4 (inset), classified “Excellent”
by The American Jersey- Cattle
Club, and includes Holmdale Lad
373038. nine registered Jersey cows,
each of them a fountain of the rich
"Creamline” milk for which the
v
jersey Dreed or dairy catue u ia
mous. and Are baby calves. One
cow. La Sente's Trevessa 1067(80,
save birth to a bull calf lmrnedl
ately before arrival, and the young*
ster came along with his mother.
The other calves are granddaugh
ters of Mourma 1147847, national
grand champion Jersey cow in 1887.
The herd Is owned by Meridale
Farms, Meredith, N. Y., which was
established (1 years ago by the
late F. Wayland Ayer, celebrated
advertising executive. Meridale
Farm Is the home of more than 600 ,
head of purebred Jersey cattle and,
in the half-century since it was
established with a email family
herd, has exerted a great Influence
upon the dairy industry of the na
tion through Its Importation and
breeding of the daily cattle that
orig< iated hundreds of years ago
on the island of Jersey tat the
English Channel. .
LOANS
To jm Repaid Weekly, Seal-MoatUy or Mcatfcljr
SAYINGS
Citibo, Weekly Seringa or Certificate of
INDUSTRIAL LOAN ft INVESTMENT BANK
IS* 8. Ckarck St
Special Purchase!
1200
MESH
SHIRTS
$1.50 Valu
$|oo
A marvelous “buy” in cool, smart-looking
Summer shirts. These are correctly sized
and well tailored. Made with non-wilt
collar attached. Sizes 13 to 17. Buy a
dozen while you can get them at this low
price!
Men’s Pajamas
»]00
A wonderful collection of specially se
lected values in men’s pajamas. New
stripes and fancy patterns. Fast-color
materials. Sizes A, B, C and D.
MEN’S STORE—STREET FLOOR
BELK BROS.
CHARLOTTE, N. C.
CHARLOTTE |
FRIDAY - SATURDAY
FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY:
A COIU MBIA PICTURE
PATRONIZE JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
PATRONIZE THOSE
WHO ADVERTISE IN
THE JOURNAL
ENJOY THE BEST
ASK FOR
PEI
ICE CREAM
1111 Central Ave.
PET DAIRY PRODUCTS CORP?
The weaker the argument, the
stronger the words.
Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted
F. C. ROBERTS
OPTOMETRIST
U*y» 8. Tryea SU PWe Mill
Char latte. N.
SOME OF THE THINGS
WE LEND MONEY ON
Watches
Jewelry
Men’s Clothing
Tools
Sporting Goods
All Busin
Silverware
Shot Guns
Rifles
Pistols
Trunks
Adding Machir
Bags
Suit Cases
Musical
Instruments
Kodaks
Typewriters
Strictly Confidential, When in Need of
Money We Never Fail You
121 E. TRADE ST. (Next to Belk’s)
See Us For Bargains in Diamond Watches, Jewelry, Clothing,
RELIABLE LOAN CO.
    

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