North Carolina Newspapers

    CORDELIA PARK RECREATION
COUNCIL SPONSORING EVENT
FOR THE FOURTH OF JULY
Editor Labor Journal:
Cordelia Park Recreation Council is
sponsoring the official opening July
4th, 2 A. M„ until 9 P. M.. to which
they extend a cordial invitation to the
Central Labor Union and the public at
large. There will be sufficient re cre
ation leaders on hand to assist all age
groups in various play activities.
Some of the city councilmen and the
Park Hoard are expected.
Rerfeshments will be served free> of
charge from 6 o'clock until 7 o'clock.
In the evening there will be a com
munity singing, which will take place
every week for the enjoyment of ev
ery one who will come out.
Cordelia Park has never had a for
ma; opening. Mr. Bird who takes
care of the park, has become so in
terested in his work that he engaged
Ihe interest of some of the citizen*
in the community and elsewhere in
the city.
A citizen’s committee has been
formed of those living close to the
park to have entertainment and
things of interest at the Park.
A skating rink will soon be built
by Organized Labor and the com
munity feels most grateful to the
Central Labor Union and the public.
The citizens composing the com
mittee are:
Mrs. J. A. Horn, Chairman; Mrs.
C. J. Pridgen, Treasurer; Mrs. W. H.
Ferguson, Secretary; Mrs. A. B.
Clontz. Mr. C. Ii. Adkins, Mr. F. F«
King, Mr. Leonard Austin, Mr. W. H.
Ferguson.
Kespectfuily submitted by,
MRS. W. H. FERGUSON,
Recording Secretary.
SOUTHERN LABOR NOTES
AMERICAN HAT COMPANY SIGNS
PACT WITH MILLINERY UNION
ATLANTA, GA., July 1. — Last
Monday was another red-letter day
in the trade union movement in At
lanta, when the American Hat com
pany signed an agreement with the
local union of the United Hatters,
Cap and Millinery Workers Interna
tional. The American. Hat company
occupies a powerful position in the
millinery industry of the south, the
president of the company, Mr. L. D.
Thompson, being president of the
Southern Millinery Manufacturers
Association. This agreement came two
days after the Standard Hat company
signed a union agreement with the
local Union, which marked the first
time in history that the union had
obtained a union agreement with mil
linery manufacturer in the south.
BREWERY WORKERS SIGN
RENEWAL CONTRACTS
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., July 3.—
According to Frank Kodatt, president
of Brewery Workers’ Local Union No.
1171, it is reported that the Jax Brew
ing company was the first to sign the
agreement calling for an increase in
wage scales and other beneficial
working conditions.
ENGINEERS AND GENERAL
CONTRACTORS SIGN PACT
MEMPHIS, TENN., July 3, —
Hoisting and Portable Engineers Un
ion signed a union agreement with
the Memphis chapter of the Associat
ed General Contractors last week, es
tablishing formal union relations for
the first time since 1937.
GOVERNMENT WORKERS
ORGANIZE NEW LODGE
MURFREESBORO, TENN., July.
—One new Lodge is recorded for the
A. F. G. F., this week—Lodge No.
G58, Veterans’ Administration Fa
cility, Murfreesboro, Tenn. J. M.
Doyle is temporary president, and
A. J. Johnson temporary secretary
treasurer.
Liberty Forever
"Liberty Forever" were the words the patriots told each other in
1776 when the majestic tones of the Liberty Bell proclaimed the signing
of the Declaration of Independence. They are still the watchwords of
American patriots today. Here you see the new and retiring presidents
of the Sons of the Revolution as they visited Liberty Bell in Independence
Hall, Philadelphia, recently, dedicating themselves anew to the cause of
freedom for which their forefathers fought. Reading from left to right:
William T. Van Alstyne, New York, the new president; Lient. Col. John
B. Richards, Fall River, Mass., retiring president; Judge Edwin O. Lewis
of Philadelphia who presided at opening session of the society’s convention.
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GASTONIA, N. C. *
TEXTILE WORKERS’ LOCAL
UNIONS IN SOUTH CAROLINA
LABOR CONVl|pnON
COLUMBIA, S. C., July 3.—A large
delegation of textile Workers, repre
senting local unions throughout the
state, were in attendance at the con
vention of the S. C. State Federation
of Labor held here last Friday and
Saturday. Their attendance as duly
elected delegates emphasised the rapid
manner in which the textile workers
of South Carolina have been coming
into the American Federation of
Labor since the United'Textile Work
ers of America came back into the A.
F. of L. a year ago.
NASHVILLE HOTEL SIGNS UNION
SHOP AGREEMENT WITH LOCAL
NASHVILLE, TENN., July.—Per
haps the first hotel in the south to
sign a union agreement is the Andrew
Jackson Hotel of this city, now oper
ating under such agreement with Lo
cal Union No. 567, Hotel and Res
taurant Employes. While this organi
sation is growing throughout the
south, it is believed that this is the
first union shop agreement obtained
with a hotel for all of its employes.
SANTEE-COOPER WORKERS
OWE MUCH TO LABOR UNION.
SAYS GOVERNOR MAYBANK
COLUMBIA, S. C.. July 3.—'"Every
cent over 20 cents an hour that com
mon labor employed on the Santee
Cooper project gets, and every cent
that skilled labor gets over 60 cents
an hour, was obtained for those work
ers by A1 Flynn and his fellow of
ficers of the State Federation of La
bor and the International Union rep
resentatives,” asserted Governor May
bank here last Friday, in an address
delivered to the convention of the
State Federation of Labor. The Gov
ernor was relating labor’s part in get
ting the Santee-Cooper project start
ed, and then told how he, as chair
man of the South Carolina Authority
under whose direction the Santee
Cooper dam is being constructed,
worked with President Flynn and
other labor representatives in getting
the wage rates raised to a fairly de
cent scale.
Federal Court
Refuses To Ban
Union Picketing
WASHINGTON, D. C. — Federal
District Judge Jamw W. Morris re
fused to prevent Teamsters, Chauf
feaus and Helpers Local No. 639 from
picketing a restaurant which bought
ice from a company with which the
union had a controversy. Suits filed
by the ice company and the restaurant
owner named the union and four of
its officers as defendants.
Judge Morris ruled that a labor
I dispute was involved and that there
fore the court was forbidden by the
Norris-La Guardia Act to grant an
injunction. He refused, however, to
dismiss two damage suits against the
union resulting from the picketing.
THE JOURNAL has by far
the largest city circulation of
any weekly published in Char
lotte. Your ad in The Journal
will bring results from the
workers.
240,000 Jobless Get
Jobs Past 30 Days
Says Dept Labor
WASHINGTON, D. C. —The De
partment of Labor reported that as
a result of national defense work and
seasonal gains non-agricultural jobs
had increased 240,000 between April
15 and May 16, sending the level of
employment about 1,000,000 above the
same period last year.
The report said there had been a
large expansion in war materials in
dustries — aircraft tripled over 1937;
50 per cent increase in the engine in
dustry. Large expansion in shipbuild
ing, machine tools, aluminum and ex
plosives was also noted.
Among the employment gains the
report listed 130,000 men added to
the payrolls of the construction in
dustries, public and private, in May,
and 60,000 additional workers em
ployed by wholesale and retail stores.
The textile, apparel and automobile
industries laid off about 50,000 men,
a decline of 0.6 but payrolls during
the period rose 12 per cent.
APPEAL COURT UPHOLDS
BROWDER'S CONVICTION
NEW YORK, N. Y.—The United
States Circuit Court of Appeals up
held the conviction by the Federal
District Court of Earl Browder, Com
munist candidate for President and
general secretary of the Communist
party in the United States, on charges
of obtaining a passport by fraud.
Browder is under sentence of four
years in prison and a fine of $2,500,
but has not yet started his term in
jail.
PATRONIZE
JOURNAL
ADVERTISERS
RADIO INFLUENCE
Three-year-old Nancy's father had
nstalled a new radio. Nancy listen
id with rapt attention to everything
-music, speeches, and station an
louncements.
That night she knelt to say her
Now I lay me.” At the end, she
mused a moment and then said: “To
norrow night at this time there will
• another prayer,1*
Have a Good Time
This 4th of July,
But, Take It Easy!
Every July 4th ell America
turns out for one big day of fun.
This celebration is, of course,
ufitting and proper?' mit altcays
present is the specter of accident
and tragedy. Here are some of
the main reasons accidents occur
in such large numbers and a
hint or two on how to avoid
them:
According to the National Safety
Connell, accident* of all types
claimed 8,800 lirea last July. Traffle
accidents accounted for 2,850 of
these. My’s accident losses are 22
per cent higher than that of the aver
age month. Be smart and drive
carefully. Don’t bo a road-hog or a
t
Public accidents, other than mo- |
tor vehicles, reach their year's
peak in Jnly. This classification in
cludes drowninys and one-fifth of all
drowninys occur In this month.
Most of these happen at beaches
where there is no supervision.
Fireworks add greatly to July’s
high accident rate. Despite wide
spread legislation against this com
mon cause of blindness and infec
tion many small children continue
to hold private fireworks displays,
with disastrous results.
Careless ■ campers like the one
.above, Just ready to toss a lighted
cigarette to the winds, are respon
sible for many costly fires on the
nation's big holiday. Be earefnl and
thonghtfni this Fourth.
That “natural-tan” we all envy,
and tome of us try to obtain In a
tingle day’s exposure to the tun
m the Fourth, can be a dangerous
thing. Not only it sunburn painful
bnt there It the ever-present danger
el heat prostration.
Thirst knows no season
A Long Range Prediction
By JOHN ADAMS
On July 2,1776, the delegates from
the 13 colonies, meeting in Phila
delphia, voted to separate from Brit
ain. On that day, taro days before
the Declaration of Independence was
signed, John Adams, later to become
second President of the United
States, wrote to his wife, Abigail:
"I am apt to believe that it (the
day) will be celebrated by succeed
ing generations as the great anniver
sary festival. It ought to be com
memorated as the day of deliver
ance, by solemn acts of devotion to
God Almighty. It ought to be solem
nized with pomp and parade, with
shows, games, sports, guns, bells,
bonfires, and illuminations from one
end of this continent to the other,
from this time forward evermore.
“You will think me transported
with enthusiasm but I am not I am
well aware of the toil and blood and
treasure that it will cost to defend
these States. Yet through all the
gloom I can see the rays of ravish
ing light and glory. I can see that
the end is more than worth all the
means; and that posterity will tri
umph in that day’s transaction, even
though we should rue it, which I
trust in God we shall not.”
Adams predicted pretty well the
nature of the celebration, although
Abigail Adams, who had the
unique distinction of being the wife
of one President and the mother of
another. John Adams, second Pres
ident, was her husband. John Quincy
Adams, sixth President, was her
he did think we would be celebrating
the second of July instead of thei
Fourth.
A Few Items Of
News From Calvine
Mill Community
r John T. Sweet of Calvine has join
ed the navy and will leave soon.
B. L. Williams, an employe of the
Sanitary Department and his wife
will spend the week-end around
Asheville. Mr. Williams’ sister, Eve
lyn, of Lance Packing Company, will
accompany them to Asheville, where
parties' have been planned for her.
The latter will then spend some time
at Myrtle Beach before returning to
Charlotte.
Mrs. Roy Foster who has been sick
the past week is reported as some
better.
At Calvine we look forward each
week for the coming of the Labor
Journal, and we enjoy reading it a
great deal and also we do not forget
the advertisers when we go to make
our purchases.
Everyone is looking for a big time
on the Fourty. Most of us are expect
ing to make trips if we can.
MRS. BERTHA HELMS.
Colvine Mill,
‘Charlotte, N. C.
CATHOLIC ORDER FIGHTS
TOTALITARIAN IDEOLOGY
ROCHESTER, N. Y. —Delegates
to the forty-third international con
vention of the Knights of St. John
expressed one hundred per cent op
position to the totalitarian ideology
of state supremacy over the family
and decided to “build a program and
organize it into a political power”
to make their opposition more effec
tive.
THE OLD REFRAIN
Tis the night before pay-day, and all
through my jeans
I’ve hunted in vain for the ways and
the means;
Not a quarter is stirring, not even a
jit;
The kale is off duty, the greenbacks
have quit;
Forward, turn forward, O Time, in
thy flight,
And make it tomorrow, just for to
night!
Business depression needs ‘perform’
and ‘reform.’
Typos Meet Sunday
At 2 P. M., Moose
Hall, S. Tryon St.
The regular monthly meeting of
Typographical Union No. 338 will be
held Sunday afternoon at 2 P. M. in
the Moose Hall, South Tryon Street.
As usual this meeting will be preceded
at 12 noon, by a meeting of the Allied
Printing Trades Council. A new local
for this council will be, we under
stand, the Mailers;
THE TWO ROADS
By TOM H. BRITTAIN
Los Angeles
Two roads there are, we walk upon.
As on through life we go.
On one of them, we meet with
knocks,
And find the going slow,
The other road seems smooth and
clear.
No troubles bar the way,
And on this road some of us
Would like to walk and stay.
Some like to take the path that’s
clear,
That has no hidden rocks.
They take the road the bosses tread
With their inflated stocks.
They speed and sweat, and do as
they are told,
Alas, they find the time has come
When they are getting old.
But some there are who take the
road
That’s tough upon the feet.
They know the grade is hard to
make,
The going far from sweet.
They are union minded men of
course,
Men brought from darkness into
light,
And so they sUrt to journey on,
Prepared to make a fight.
Without the folks who take the
road
Beset with snags and snares,
We’d hare no one to lead us,
And to guide us in our affairs
■ ' I . - _
PATRON!
E
JOURNAL ADVERTISERS !
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