North Carolina Newspapers

    Alaska Seeking
War Refugees
Plan to Let Scandinavian
And Other Settlers
Aid Development.
WASHINGTON.-Organization of
a nationwide campaign to support
legislation providing for the econom
ic development of Alaska through
colonization by Scandinavian and
other European refugees and Amer
ican citizens was announced here to
day by the Alaskan development
committee.
The committee said the campaign
was backed by American industri
als and Alaskan trade groups as a
means of opening up a new econom
ic and social frontier and tapping
the territory’s rich, latent resources.
The Alaskan development plan also
has received the vigorous approval
of Harold L. Ickes, secretary of the
interior.
Finnish, Norwegian and other ref
ugees from war-torn Europe would
be settled in Alaska to undertake
development of industry, commerce
and mining under legislation intro
duced in !congress by Sen. William
H. King, Democrat, of Utah, and
Rep. Frank R. Havenner, Democrat.
Solve Many Problems.
The plan, which experts have con
tented would contribute greatly to
ward solution of problems of nation
al defense, provides for the private
ly financed development of Alaska’s
resources by public purpose corpo
rations, each capitalized at a mini
mum of $10,000,000. The King-Hav
enner bill specifies that American
citizens must be given preference in
at least 50 per cent of the jobs (Of
fered to prospective settlers. The
settlement of American citizens and
Scandinavian and other refugees,
representing skilled labor and war
disrupted industries, would give vi
tal impetus to numerous undevel
oped Alaskan enterprises, such as
agriculture and live stock, mining,
smelting, wood pulp and paper man
ufacturing, fish processing and fur
farming, supporters of the plan de
clare.
Economic Importance.
“Alaskan development,” said the |
committee in its statement initiat
ing the campaign, “can be of inesti- '
mable economic importance in cre
ating new markets for millions of
dollars of products of American in
dustry and agriculture, and in pro
viding sources of vital commodities
which the United States needs for
the maintenance of its economy.
Such development is likewise essen
tial to the interests of national de- 1
fense because of the difficulty of
defending a vast unpopulated area
of American soil separated by only
54 miles from war-torn Asia.”
Alaska has been called by mili
tary experts “the most important
strategic area in the world.” Today,
they say, it represents a weak spot
in the national defense because it
lacks population and facilities for
transportation, communication
housing, hospitalization, storage of
supplies or repair of equipment, all
of which are essential to defense and
dependent upon population. The war
and navy departments have ex
pressed special interest in economic
and commercial development of the
territory as a whole.
The climate of Alaska compares
favorably with that of Scandinavia,
and its size and resources exceed
those of Sweden, Norway and Fin
land combined.
Ill
this Sign
this Battle
REX
RECREATION
AND BOWLING AUJET
Where Union Men Meet
121-127 A TBTOM ML
7 Mir Reoud Air CW1W—ed
DeVONDE
Synthetic
CLEANERS — DYERS
HATTERS — FURRIERS
SEVEN POINTS WHY WE ARE
ONE OF THE SOUTH'S LEAD
ING SYNTHETIC CLEANERS
1 R*r*«re* original freshness ud
•park)*
2 Remove* carefully all dirt, dwt
and grease
S Harmless to the moot delicate
of fabrics.
4 Odorleo*. thorough cleaning
5 Garment* stay dean longer
S Press retained longer
7 Reduce* wardrobe upkeep
CALL 3-&125
304 N. Try on St.
B* L. L. STEVENSON
Novelette: She is a small girl and
her weight was just under 100
pounds. Seeking a situation as a
secretary, she happened to visit a
model agency. Before she could
make an application, she was em
ployed. Not as a secretary. It seems
that a search had been made for a
model exactly her height, type and
weight. The work proved pleasant
and her earnings were such she was
soon able to take a small apartment
on Riverside drive. One evening as
she neared her home, a gust of wind
picked her up and threw her to the
sidewalk. Her physician said her
ankle was broken. Nothing really
serious. Merely a few weeks in
bed. Recently she was discharged
from the hospital completely cured.
Practice soon enabled her to walk
without a limp. But now she's mak
ing the rounds looking for a job as
a secretary. Enforced idleness
caused her to put on so much weight
she can’t model.
• • •
Here Si There: An ungrateful traf
fic cop writing out a summons for
a vegetable truck parked in a ‘No
Parking” area while his horse
munches contentedly on greens
hanging over the truck’s side ... A
fluffy little blonde, looking as fragile
as a reed, planting a healthy sock
on the chin of the chunky fresh guy
who flung a remark to her as she
was about to cross Broadway at
Fiftieth . . . Fifty-ninth street han
som cab drivers doing quite a brisk
business . . . Influence ot the season
no doubt . . . Four women bridge
players stopping to review hands as
they leave one of the numerous mid
town clubs . . and then going on
their way to another game ... A
pigeon perched atop the Pulitzer
statue opposite the Plaza, calmly
preening its plumage.
Ardent: Frequently those called
on by Mrs. Julia Chandler to talk
in her Empire State tower broad
casts express political opinions.
There is no objection to that but
after the broadcasts she has quite a
lot of trouble keeping those of oppos
ing viewpoints from clashing physi
cally. That’s accomplished largely
by diplomacy. Well, the other day,
someone asked her if she favored a
third term for Mr. Roosevelt. Her
reply was that she did. Where
upon, a gentleman in the crowd that
clustered about her grabbed her
hand and bit her little finger. That’s
why, just now, while her injury is
healing, she is careful to follow the
middle-of-the-road politically.
Wilds: In his book, “The Jungle
Route,” Frank W. Kravigny tells of
the building of the Madeira-Mamore
railroad in the jungles of Bolivia, an
undertaking that cost at least 10,
000 lives or one for every crosstie.
Quinine, says Mr. Kravigny, always
appeared on the table at every meal
and everyone present took from five
to ten grains. In the course of a
year in which he worked on the rail
road, he swallowed at least 10,000
grains. Thus he escaped malaria.
But on his way to his New York
home, while still on the Amazon, he
became careless, was bitten by a
mosquito and fell victim to the dis
ease. Written 30 years later, the
book is an interesting, and at times
exciting, account of a part in a
memorable and tragic undertaking.
It is profusely illustrated.
# * •
Delay: The other afternoon, a
young woman set out to see “Gone
With the Wind” at a neighborhood
theater. Dinnertime came and still
she didn't return. Her roommate,
who knew the running time of the
film, couldn’t understand the delay.
Finally, as hours passed, she be
came so worried she was about to
call the police. As she picked up
the telephone, her friend came in.
After all, the long absence was eas
ily explained. She had merely sat
through the picture a second time.
• • •
End Piece: Frankie Masters,
chatting with an obviously British
guest at the Roosevelt, wanted to
know how London was reacting to
American song hits. He asked about
"Oh, Johnny,” "Sunrise Serenade,”
etc., and the Britisher replied they
were o. k. Finally Masters men
tioned “Scatterbrain.”
“That,” replied the guest, “is un
doubtedly the stupidest song I have
ever heard. You don’t play it here,
do you?”
“Play it!” exclaimed Masters. "I
wrote it.”
(Bell Syndicate—WNU Servlet.)
Will Creates Puzzle;
Money Left to Deity
MURPHY, N. C.—Among the
last wills and testaments record
ed in Cherokee county. North Car
olina, is that of an eccentric wom
an who left part of her estate to
God.
\ In an endeavor to settle the
case properly, the usual suit,
naming God a party thereof, was
filed. And at the summons, the
sheriff made this response:
"After due and diligent search,
God cannot be found in Cherokee
county.” *
WHO'S WH
IN UNION!
PATRICK E. GORMAN
l
PATRICK E. GORMAN
Patrick E. Gorman, President, of
the Amalgamated Meat Cutters
and .Butcher Workmen of North
America entered the packing''in
dustry as an employe of the Cuda
hey Company in Louisville in 1910.
He served as secretary of his Local
Union from 1914 to 1920 when he
was elected General Vice President
.of the International Union. In
1923 he was elevated to the presi
dency, which position he now holds.
Mr. Gorman was a graduate of
St. Xavier College and in 1917 he
received a law degree from the
University of Louisville. His ex
perience in the Labor Union move
ment together with his education
have well fitted him for the re
sponsible position of leadership
that he now holds in his Interna
tional Union.
Through Mr. Gorman’s leader
ship, his International Union has
succeeded in negotiating a nation
wide agreement with the National
Retail Meat Dealers’ Association,
which virtually gives butcher work
men a closed shop agreement >in
30,000 stores operated by this asso
ciation. He has been able to ne
gotiate agreements for the mem
bers of his International Union in
other meat markets and the work
men operate their own strike and
retirement benefits as well as death
funds.
His address is: Mr. Patrick E.
Gorman, President, Amalgamated
Meat Cutters and Butcher Work
men of North America, 160 North
LaSalle Street, Room 706, Chi
cago, Illinois.
I1H10M MARSH1
THIS IS TO CERTIFY.tim in nm u k
I w«lh rt>« nitm * Mm Am
Ml WmAfmn 1 Norm AkmHca A. 9 W L
MEAT CUTTERS AND BUTCH
ERS’ STORE CARD
The Amalgamated Meat Cutters
and Butcher Workmen of North
America adopted a Union Shop
Card in 1897. It is displayed in
the windows or on the walls of all
butcher shops and retail stores
i where meats are sold.
For further information regard
ing Union Labels, Shop Cards and
Service Buttons write Mr. I. M.
O r n b u r n , Secretary-Treasurer,
Union Label Trades Department,
American Federation of Labor
Building, Washington, D. C.
GOOD ADVICE
A portly woman had, by mistake,
taken a seat in a railway coach re
served for smokers. With unconcealed
indignation she saw the man next to
her fill his pipe.
“Sir,” she said in frigid tones,
“smoking always makes me ill.”
The man calmly lit his pipe and
puffed contentedly before replying.
“Does it, ma’am? Well, take my advice
and give it up.”
ASK DAD, HE KNOWS
“Dad, what do they mean when
they talk about the ups and downs of
life?”
“The giving ups and the paying
downs, son.”
The human body produces nearly
half an ounce of glycerine daily front
the fats of the day’s rations.
NOW IN FULL SWING! DON’T MISS IT!
BELK’S JULY
I • ’ | *
MEN'S AND
BOYS' WEAR
Prices Greatly Reduced!
: BELK BROS.
STREET
FLOOR
Hillbilly Ballads
A Hit on ‘Big Time9
Doleful Mountain Music Is
Popular With Public.
GATLINBURK, TENN.—Hillbilly
ballads from the cabins of the south
ern Appalachians are getting a
break in the Big Time.
Tunes that never knew any instru
ment but a fiddle, broomstraws and
a banjo have won popularity with
big orchestras as program spicers.
Hillbilly bands are getting fan
mail and mountain folk song sym
phonies have received acclaim in
recent years.
The mountain songs boast a proud
lineage for the most part. Many of
the words and tuns can be traced to
Elizabethan England. Students and
song collectors have been interested
in them for this reason for years.
But it is only comparatively re
cently that the sometimes lilting,
sometimes doleful music has caught
the fasncy of the public.
These Southern mountaineers,
with their Anglo-Saxon ancestry, are
a musical lot, and even the poorest
cabin boasts a banjo and a fiddle
hanging on the wall, while lots of
the songs have been preserved
through mountain community sing
ings and dances. Many are in bet
ter preservation in the Appalachians
than in England and Scotland.
Several cities and towns through
out the mountain area have taken
steps to preserve the mountain folk
songs and dances by sponsoring a
yearly festival with prizes for the
best of them. Collectors have been
assembling mountain ballads for
years.
There’s one they sing hereabouts
called “Gypso Davy,” obviously
from a Scotch legend about a ban
ished Gypsy king, Johnny Faa, who
took the wife of one of the lairds
with him when he fled.
“So late in the night when the land
lord came _
Inquiring fur his lady,
The answer was quickly replied
‘She has gone with Gipso Davy,’ "
i that’s the local version.
o.iitiiiiiED
A party of tourisms was visiting th<
wonders of the West. They seemec
unable to find words to express theii
impressions of the Grand Canyon un
til one “down Easter” broke out with
“Golly, what a gully!”
ANNOUNCING
NEW LOCATION
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DISTINCTIVE FOUNTAIN SERVICE
125 W. TRADE ST.
LOANS
To tw Repaid Weekly, Semi-Monthly or Monthly
SAVINGS
Xnuu Ci.ibs, Weekly Savings or Certificate of Deposit
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124 S. Church St.
Wherever you go
DRINK
No. 28-11
PATRONIZE
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ADVERTISERS*
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A meek college professor turned
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scientist who gave him life to bring
death to others!
BELA » BORIS
LUCOSI "* ■ KARLOFF
PATRONIZE JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
PATRONIZE THOSE
WHO ADVERTISE IN
THE JOURNAL
ENJOY THE BEST
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The weaker the argument, the
stronger the words.
F. C. ROBERTS*
OPTOMETRIST
114)4 a Tryen St. FlMa* MM4
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WE LEND MONEY ON
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