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    TU ONLY REALLY INDEPENDENT WEEKLY In Mccklenbnrg Comfy
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Official Organ Central
Labor Union; standing for
the A. F. of L.
Wax Charlotte labor Journal
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VOL. X—NO. 10
VOUM AOV in TIM I MINT IN TMC JOURNAL. •• A
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CHARLOTTE, N. C„ THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1940
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THE A. F. OF L URGES OUR COUNTRY
TO MODERNIZE AND STRENGTHEN
AGAINST “FIFTH COLUMN” TACTICS
When Democratic Governments are forced into war they are
loyally supported by Organized Labor. This evident fact was very
forcefully brought out in Great Britain and is now being evidenced
in the United States through the 100 per cent support of Presi
dent Roosevelt’s Defense Program by the American Federation
of Labor, although we are not yet involved in a conflict. The Ex
ecutive Council of the A. F. of L. has made the following pledge:
“In 1917 the American Federation of Labor demonstrated
its readiness and willingness to do everything within its power
to assist the Government in the winning of the war. This pledge
of support went farther than that of any other national Trade
Union movement of the countries which were involved.
“In the present emergency, caused by the necessity for a
rapid development of the nation’s defense, the American Federa
tion of Labor again pledges its active and co-operative support
w.th industry and with every appropriate governmental agency
hiving to do with the production and construction of material for
national defense or any other national requirement to that end.”
In regard to an alleged shortage of skilled mechanics and
other workers for the Defense Program, the Executive Council
added:
“The problem is not a shortage of skilled mechanics but the
fact that so many of these have been forcel by the depression to
seek employment in lower wage occupations.”
“The emotional effort to immediately suspend rules and regu
lations now protecting Labor will not appeal to thoughtful
Americans.”
Phesident William Green explained at a press conference that
it would be disastrous to lower wages and hour standards at a
time when millions of Americans are unemployed. He urged that
extra shifts be put to work, if necessary, to speed up production
of defense equipment. Only if an actual emergency arises and if
real labor shortages exist will it become necessary to lengthen
hours, he declard.
As further evidence of thorough co-operation by the Amer
ican Federation of Labor, the Executive Council recommended the |
following program for accelerating the more adequate defense of
our country: )
“1. This country must quickly strengthen and modernize its
defense, taking advantage of the lessons in new military tech
niques which the present European war affords.
“2. We must not let emotion unbalance our clear thinking
nor contribute to the development of war psychology. Rash and
hysterical statements should especially be avoided by those in a
position to influence public opinion.
“3. We must redouble our vigilance against treachery and
the creation of Trojan Horse organizations by Soviet and Nazi
adherents to This country'.”
e THE MARCH OF LABOR
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Trade Oaj*w 'TMilos6PhY .
Roosevelt Drafted for 3d X
erm
FRANKLIN DeLANO ROOSEVBLT, Chosen at the Chicago
Democratic Convention, Thursday Morning,
To Head Ticket lor the New Dealers
Local Wage-Hour
Force Is Reduced
Moved From City
Charlotte will lose practically all
of its wage and hour division staff
this week with the establishment of
state offices for this region in Colom
bia, S. C., and in Raleigh.
Jack Lang, who recently opened the
1 Columbia office, will have in that
office 10 inspectors, three pay roll
examiners, nine clerical and steno
graphic employes, and one attorney,
all moved to South Carolina from the
Charlotte office.
Major A. L. Fletcher, director of the
division, will set up in Raleigh his
new headi|Uarters and thus the princi
pal office for this state. A small force
will remain in Charlotte under direc
tion of K.cd J. Coxe, Jr., senior in
spector. Major Fletcher will move
the latter part of the week.
New Locals Are In
stalled On The
Santee Cooper Job
CHARLESTON, S. C., July 15.—
Announcement has been made to the
Charleston Building Trades Council
that three new local unions have been
chartered during the past three weeks.
One is a Local Union of the Inter
national Teamsters and Chauffeurs of
America, and two Local Unions for
the International Hod Carriers, Com
mon and Construction Laborers. Char
ters have been installed for each of
| three Local Unions, officers named
I and proper committees appointed for
' carrying on the work. While all crafts
employed on the Santee-Cooper job
| show large increases in membership
i of the local unions, the Carpenters
! and joiners Local Union shows a tre
‘ mendous increase. James Coles, busi
ness agent for the carpenters, is high
ly elated over the growth of his or
ganization.
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THE JOURNAL has by far
the largest city circulation of
P weekly published in Char
e. Your ad in The Journal
bring results front the
hers.
Huntersville Textile
Workers Organize
Local Union No. 2583
HUNTERSVILLE, Ala., July 15.—
Charter for Local Union No. 2583,
United Textile Workers of America,
has been installed here, officers
named and the Local is now func
tioning for the benefit of the mem
bership. This news is most hearten
ing to . all labor throughout Alabama,
as the CIO has long made desperate
to keep the A. F. of L. out of the tex
tile plants in this city, it being one of
the few places in the United States
where the CIO has any appreciable
membership among textile workers.
Prediction is freely made now that
installation of this charter will soon
lead to the formation of other locals
in this vicinity.
QUITE SO
English Exam Qneation: "Ohm
three collective nouns.”
Student’s Answer: “Flypaper,
waste-basket and vacuum deanar.”
Red, White and Blue!
By BEN FAUCET
Red, White and Blue, that is our Flag,
Let not our fervor for it lag;
RED for the blood that we would shed
To keep it waving overhead!
WHITE for the sincere motives we
Employ to make our people free!
BLUE for the loyalty we share
To help our Nation to prepare!
Red, White and Blue, long may it wave
To make “Fifth Columnists” behave;
The Eagle screams above its folds
A warning to the “over-bolds”
Who might attempt to scourge our Land
With treachery and underhand
Approaches we now recognize
As "Trojan Horses” in disguise!
WHO'S WHO
IN UNIONS
W. J. DONOVAN
WILLIAM J. DONOVAN
William J. Donovan, General
Preaident of the Laundry Workera’
International Union, started his
Labor career in 1905 by organis
inf tea meters in the city of Chi
cago. In September of 1937, Mr.
Donovan became Preaident of
Local No. 46 of the Laundry Work
ers’ International Union. It had
very few members and was in debt
over |8,000. There are more than
10,000 dues paying members in that
Local. It was principally due to
the successful organisation of this
Local .Union that the Laundry
Workers’ International Union was
established.
In September, 1939, Mr. Donovan
was reelected by a referendum vote
of 10 to 1. Through his long ex
perience in organization work and
his aggressive methods in Unionis
ing laundries the Union has been
placed on a sound membership and
financial basis. >
His address is: Mr. William J.
Donovan, President, Laundry
Workers’ International Union,
Room 608, 10 North Clark Street,
Chicago, Illinois.
LAUNDRY WORKERS’ LABEL
The Union Label of the Laundry
Workers’ International Union is
stamped on the price lists of all
Union laundries. It was adopted
in 1900.
For further information regard
ing Union Labels, Shop Cards and
8ervice Buttons write Mr. I. M.
Ornbnrn, Secretary-Treasurer,
Union Label Trades Department,
American Federation — of Labor
Building, Washington, D. C.
And no* they are using cotton as a
base for a new ice cream, and the cot
ton growers are jubilant.—American
Petroleum Institute,
A. F. OF L RAILWAY LABOR UNIONS
AND THE C. I. 0. PLEDGE SUPPORT
TO NATIONAL DEFENSE PROGRAM
WASHINGTON, July 14—Belief
that the needs of national defense
might bring an end to organized la
bor’s five-vear-old civil war was ex
preused at the White House yester
day after sixteen officials of the CIO,
the AFL and Railway Labor Unions
had pledged co-operation in the de
fense program.
The promise of co-operation was
given to President Roosevelt in a let
t ‘i' signed by the labor officials who
make up the labor policy advisory
committee of the National Defense
Commission. This committee was
created recently for the announced
purpose of preventing stoppages of
woik in vital defense industries’ and
preserving labor standards.
Expressing “full and unstinted de
votion to our country and to the pro
gram of national defense,” the union
leaders told the President:
“We and our membership are united
in our effort and determination to
give effective and expeditious co-oper
ation in the fulfillment of the de
fense program, and to contribute to
a free and secure democracy.”
Stephen Early, Mr. Roosevelt's
pi ess secretary, made public the let
ter and commented that it represented ■.
the nearest thing to a labor
front since the AFL-CIO split devel
oped.
Saying the letter had made the
Pieisdent quite happy, Early addec
that it was a good one because it
showed that national defense migh
be the means of bringing labor to
gether again.
“At least,’ ’the Secretary declared
"it holds out that hope.”
Eaily pointed out that the labc
policy advisory committee was not
group which had been called togeth<
by the President. It was organise
recently through the efforts of Si*
ney Hiilman, a CIO leader who is'
member of the Natior * *-"*« Cor
mission in charge a. ......ting work
ers, and D. W. Tracy, chairman of the
executive board of AFL’s Electrical
Workers, who has just taken office
as Second Assistant Secretary of
Labor.
Members of the committee have ex
pressed belief that it may be able to
help adjust many of labor's griev
ances without strikes.
Neither Wiliam Green, president
of the American Federation of Labor,
nor John L. Lewis, head of the Con
gress of Industrial Organisations, is
i number of the committee.
TEAMSTERS AND CHAUFFEURS
NOTES OF INTEREST
WASHINGTON, D. C.—President
Roosevelt appointed Daniel J. Tobin,
aggressive President of the Inter
national Brotherhood of Teamsters,
Chauffeurs, to serve as one of his
confidential administrative assist
ants in the White Hous^
Mr. Tobin will act as liason officer
between the President and all Amer
ican Federation of Labor Unions en
gaged in the national defense program.
It will be part of Mr. Tobin’s job
to see to it that everything runs
smoothly and that such co-operation
is’ kept on a high plane of- MSaeWve
ness.
CHATTANOOGA
Teamsters & Chauffeurs, Over-the
Road Committee, which has done so
much in bringing about closer co-op
eration between Truck Drivers’ Local
Unions in this section, which was held
in Chattanooga Saturday and Sunday,
July 6, 7, with headquarters at Hotel
Patten. “Several important resolu
tions were passed at the Chattanooga
meeting.” “The Committee also voted
to give all possible aid to Striking
Truck Drivers of the Rutherford
Freight Lines operating in East
Tennessee, Virginia and North Caro
lina.”
The August meeting of the South
eastern Over-the-Road Area Commit
tee will be held in Birmingham, Ala.,
Saturday and Sunday, August 10th
and 11th, in headquarters at the Red
mont Hotel. The September meeting
of the Southeastern Over-the-Road
Area Committee will be held in Wash
ington.
TAMPA
An agreement has been signed be
tween the Kingan Packing Company
and Teamsters & Chauffeurs, Local
No. 79, covering wages and working
conditions. The agreement will run
for an indefinite period subject to
change or cancellation upon 30 days
notice upon election to change any
term of the agreement.
The contract calls for regulation of
hours of work and wages which gives
an increase of about $1.50 per week
for the employee. It sets up over
time for holidays and Sundays and for
work performed in excess of over 42
hours in any one week.
INDIANAPOLIS, IND.
A call for the convention of the
International Brotherhood of Team
sters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen and
Helpers of America, by. Secretary
Hughes. The convention which meets
every four years will take place in
Washington, D. C. beginning Septem
ber 9 and will probably continue for
10 days. At this convention the con
stitution will probably be redrafted to
keep up with the times and with the
modern way of living and working.
Another topic for deliberation will
probably be the sick benefit question.
At the present time the union does
Another Election
To Be Held By Cop
per Basin Workers
COPPERHILL, Tenn., July 15.—
For the third time in the past two
years the workers employed by the
Tennessee Copper company in the
Copper Basin will go to the polls for
the purpose of electing a bargaining
agency. The election will be held on
the 25th or 26th of July. The strug
gle for supremacy between the Amer
ican Federation of Labor membership
and the CIO has been terrific during
the past three years, and it is hoped
next week's election will decide the
matter, once and for all time. Paul
J. Aymon, of Chattanooga, veteran
A. F. of L. organizer, is in charge of
the campaign in the Copper Basin
for the American Federation of
'Labor.
not have the benefit system and an
increase of per capita tax would have
to be voted in case the sick benefit
plan were adopted.
The Teamsters and Chauffeurs is
the largest union affiliated with the
American Federation of Labor with
a membership of nearly one-half mil
lion members.
H. L. McCRORIE.
The Millinery
Industry hi Atlanta
Now Unionized
ATLANTA, Ga., July 15.—An
agreement was signed last week be
tween the M. Kutz company, millinery
manufacturers, and the local union of
the United Hatters, Cap and Mil
linery Workers International Union,
which brings all millinery business in
this city into the: Union. It will be
recalled that agreements were signed
a few weeks ago between the Union
and other millinery manufacturing
plants. This is the first time that
entire industry has been operating in
Georgia under Union shop agreements.
Calvine News Notes
To Editor Labor Journal:
Miss Francis Roy spent the week
end with friends on the Monroe Road
at Mrs. Holton’s.
Miss Lois Plyler is sick at her home,
3050 N. Davidson street, North Char
lotte, but is reported improving.
Mr. C. W. White was viaitea last
week by her sister, Mrs. Henry Faulk
ner, and family, of Comet, Ala.
James Milton, and Mr. and Mra.
Harvie Davis spent the week-end at
Carolina Beach.
Mrs. Zettie Young has returned
from a four-week’s stay with her sick
brother, T. L. Arnette, on the Moil
roe road.
Hillard McDonald who has been
ill for about a year at the home «f
his sister, Mrs. Mae Henderson passed
away Wednesday night of last week.
The funeral was held Friday after
noon. The deceased had many friends
in this community, and sympathy is
extended to the bereaved family.
BERTHA HELMS.
Calvine, July 16.
FARMERS’ SUBSIDY
REACHES HUGE SUM
WASHINGTON.—The Agricultural
Adjustment Administration announced
that total payments already disbursed
and estimated to be disbursed in the
1939 agricultural conservation pro
gram, including national and admin
istrative expenses, amounted to $620,
360,802 as of April 30, 1940.
“STATEMENT*
“The American Fed*
eration has refused at all
times to compromise or
traffic with the enemies
of democracy. There is
no room in the American
Federation of Labor for
Communists or Nazis.**
WILLIAM GREEN,
President American Federa*
tion of Labor.
The United States has ever-swell
ing armament expenditure that should
keep America oat of any war.
    

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