North Carolina Newspapers

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VOL. X—NO. 18
CHARLOTTE, N. C„ THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1940
I2.INI Par Vast
REVOLT IN THE RANKS OF C L 0.
AGAINST CURRAN’S COMMUNIST
LINES—LOCALS IN REBELLION
NEW YORK, N. Y.—A telegram
sent by Jooaeph Curran, president of
the Greater New York Industrial Un
ion Council of the CIO, to hundreds
of unions in this eity asking them to
give financial support to the Emer
gency Peace Mobilisation held in Chi
cago precipitated the most wirespread
rebellion in local CIO history.
Thirty-six officers of twenty-seven
unions affiliated with the United Re
tail and Wholesale Employes of
America, CIO, started the revolt by
issuing a joint letter to Curran in
which they said:
“We consider your telegram of
Aug. 21 asking for financial aid for
the so-called ‘peace mobilisation
meeting* in Chicago tantamount to a
request that we give sustenance to a
program which would benefit the to
talitarian nations and which is, in our
opinion, diametrically opposed to the
best interests of our country and of
democracy and labor throughout the
world. You can, therefore, expect no
sunuort from us.**
Among the signers were four in.
teraatianal vice-presidents of the U.
R. W. E. A. and the president, secre*
tary and business manager of the
organization’s New York joint coun
cil. In making the communication
public, Murray J. Kudish, secretary
manager of the Retail Dairy, Grocery
and Fruit Employes Union, Local
338, accused Mr. Curran of attempt
into the so-called ‘peace front’ which
ing to “drag the name of the CIO
has been organised by the Commun
ists, Nazis and other fifth columnists.”
Other unions identified with the
anti-Communiat bloc in the CIO were
quick to disassociate themselves from
any connection with the Chicago
peace rally. Asserting that the gath
ering was backed by “all the subver
sive elements in the country," Louis
Hollander, manager of the New York
joint board of the Amalgamated
Clothing Workers of America, largest
CIO union in the metropolitan area,
said his organisation would have
“nothing at all to do with it.”
Jack Rubenstein, general manager
of the New York joint board of the
Textile Workers Union, CIO, an
nounced that the textile locals here
would ignore Mr. Curran’s appear for
funds.
ANOTHER BRIDGES INVESTIGATION
IS ON THE WAY -G-MEN ARE STILL
SEEKING TO HAVE HIM DEPORTED
WASHINGTON, D. C.—Attorney
General Robert H. Jackson announced
that J. Edgar Hoover, director of the
Federal Bureau of Investigation,
would begin immediately a new inves
tigation of Hsrry Bridges, west coast
CIO leader, to determine whether he
is deportable under the recently enact
ed Smith act.
Mr. Jackson said he was acting at
the request of Senator William H.
King, Democrat, of Utah, chairman
of the Senate Immigration Commit
tee, a majority of which recommended
recently that a bill intended specifi
cally for Bridges’s deportation be
sidertacked in favor of a new inquiry
into the cnee.
He added that Mr. Hoover was on
the west coast and was prepared to
star tthe investigation.
The Smith act, Mr. Jackson de
dared, dosed a loophole in the law
because of which deportation proceed
ings against Bridges were dropped
last December.
Senator King declared that Bridges
should be deported immediately be
cause his presence in the United
States was “hurtful." In a minority
report on the Immigration Commit
tee's recommendations he said there
was “ample factual basis" for the
House deportation bill.
“His (Bridges’s) conduct has been
so notorious, his contempt for the
American way of life so flaunted, and
his destructive influence so persua
sive, that in my opinion—an opinion
strengthened by action of the House—
there can be no denying Bridges’s
hostility to our form of government
nor the fact that-his continued pres
ence in thin •uaautiy wBf be harmful,”
Senator King said.
INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES
ARE ON THE DECREASE
SAYS SEC. OF LABOR
WASHINGTON—Sept—More
than 440,000 fewer workers took
port in industrial disputes
handled by the Conciliation
Service for the Department of
Labor in the fiscal year ending
June 30, than in the 1039 fiscal
year. Secretary of Labor Fran*
ces Perkins reported today, the
number being 1,015,540 as com
pared with 1,455,975.
MAN-MAKING
By EDWARD MARKHAM
We are all blind until we see
That in the human plan
Nothing is worth making if
It does not make the man.
Why build these cities glorious
If man unbuilded goes?
In vain we build the world unless
The builder also grows.
NEBEL STRIKE PATROL EFFECTIVE
SATURDAY A M. OF THE FAST WEEK
The new plan for the strike patrol
at Nebel mill was begun Saturday
morning. The plan calls for the
sheriff to have charge of an eight*
hour shift, the city police to have
charge of a shift, and the county po
lice to have charge of a shift
AMEN!
The finishing paragraph of •
“Mere Man’s” will:
“—And to my wife I bequeath
the balance of my eetato, both
real and personal, including my
pants, which she baa wanted to
wear for the past FIFTEEN
years."
Fill in your date, Brother.
.fail Accommodates Hiker
' But Sleep Ends Fatally
NEW PHILADELPHIA, OHIO.—
Charles W. Baker of near-by Dover,
Ohio, asked for accommodations at
the New Philadelphia Jail one night
“so he wouldn’t have to make the
walk home.” He was permitted to
sleep in a cell. During the night he
rolled off the top of the cell Mock,
fall seven feet to the floor and died
of a fractured skull.
U Glasses Only a Drop
TRUMBULL, CONN. - Alex P.
Varanelli, charged with operating
an automobile while under the influ
ence of liquor, admitted he drank 35
glasses of beer before his arrest, but
insisted that he consumed that
amount daily and was not intoxicat
ed. Judge Joseph L. Scbwimmer
acquitted him.
Bey, M, Drives Five Teats
BRIGHTON, ENG.—A boy who
drove away a surgeon’s car from
outside a Brighton hospital told the
police that he had been driving since
he was five. He is now 10. “I
learned to drive a car by sitting on
the front seat of buses while going
to school,” he said.
Crashes After 4S Tears
NEEDHAM, MASS.-After driv
ing an automobile for 40 years, Al
bert M. Beers, 70 years old, had his
first accident. His car was in col
lision with a truck and overturned,
but no one was injured
THE JOURNAL has by far
the largest city circulation of
any weekly publiahed in Char*
lotto. Your ad in The Journal
will bring resulta from the
workers.
UNFAIR TO ORGANIZED LABOR
QUALITY BOTTLING CO.
Monroe, N. C.
The bottler* of Jacob Rupert Beer, sold in the State of
North Carolina, io unfair to organised labor. This informa
tion is given The Journal by the Brewery Worker* Local, No.
340, and member* and friends of organised labor will gov
ern themselves accordingly.
Central Labor Union has concurred in the placing of
Rupert Beer on the unfair list 100 per cent.
Fly the FLAG
NATION-WIDE CAMPAIGN AGAINST
R R. DONNELLY & SONS COMPANY
IS HAVING THE DESIRED EFFECT
CHICAGO, HI.—The nation-wide
campaign against R. R. Donnelley &
Sons Company, arch-enemy of trades
unionism, is beginning to make that
firm sit up and take notice. Since
the campaign was inaugurated some
two years ago by the Organization
Committte of Chicago Printing Trades
Unions, Donnelley has lost several
millions of dollars in printing con
tracts that were diverted to union
printing establishments. The cam
paign has also prevented Donnelley
from securing an unknown number of
new contracts which the firm has been
, seeking.
In an effort to offset the campaign
and at the same time gain new cus
tomers to replace those who have
taken their work to union shops,
Donnelley salesmen are now carrying
on a campaign of their own—a cam-1
paign of misrepresentation. Recent
ly Chicago Typographical Union No.
16, through negotiations with the Chi
cago Newspapers Publishers’ Asso
ciation, abolished what was known as
the bonus system (an agreement
whereby members of the union were
paid extra compensation for setting
more than the average amount of
type). Since the abolition of the
bonus system by No. 16, Donnelley
salesmen have been telling potential
customers that porduction has been
curtailed in union commercial shops.
As a matter of fact, the abolition of
the bonus system had no effect at all
on commercial shops because it ap
plied to daily newspaper offices ex
clusively.
Campaigns of misrepresentation
are not new to the Donnelley concern.
Members of the Chicago building
trades unions will long remember the
activities of T. E. Donnelley, head of
the Donnelley enterprises, who, as
chairman of the self-appointed “Cit
izens Committee to Enforce the Lan
dies Award,” sought to wreck the
building trades unions in the Mid
west not so many years ago. This
campaign of misrepresentation was
finally halted by an order of the II
linoi* State Supreme Court after sev
eral years of litigation by the Car
pentera' District Council of Chicago.
As part of the nation-wide cam
paign against the Donnelley concern,
which has been endorsed by all state
federaitons of labor and by the
American Federation of Laoor itself,
the Organisation Committee of Chi
cago Printing Trades Unions is en
deavoring to remove from that estab
lishment the two sports magasines
known as National Sportsman and
Hunting ft Fishing.
National Sportsman and Hunting
ft Fishing magasines have been
placed on the “We Don’t Patronise
List” These taro magazines are
owned and published by National
Sportsmnn, Inc., and they are the
source of considerable revenue ta the
Donnelley concern. Their removal to
a union office will have a far-reach
ing effect in the campaign to union
ize Donnelley’s.
The Organisation Committee of
Chicago Printing Trades Unions calls
attention to the fact that there are
several union-printed sports maga
zines which carry features similar to
those found in the non-union National
Sportsman and Hunting ft Fishing
publications. Among these are: Field
ft Stream, 515 Madison Avenue, New
York; Sports Afield, Mt. Morris, Illi
nois; Outdoorsman, 386 South Fourth
Street, Columbus, Ohio, and Outdoor
Life, 553 Fourth Avenue, New York.
The union-hating Donnelley con
cern also prints tWO news maga^ay
known as Time and Life. In competi
tion with the unfair Time magazine
are the following union-printed
weeklies: Newsweek, United States
News, The New Republic and The
Nation. In competition with the non
union Life magazine are the follow
ing union-printed publications: Look
(bi-weelcly), Pic (bi-weekly), and
Click (monthly).
“What’s the best thing to do for
insomnia? I had a bad attack of it?
Just go to bed and sleep it off.
THE MARCH OF LABOR
“SJC Omanizi* m
NEW YORK M 1744
UNDER THE NAME Of THE TVfO—ARHUAZ
* SOCIETY.
1017 - >093
HUNK A If MWttfAN
uamc or coiotio
LAtOtIKS TO fltOMOn
ONIONS AMONOMMOiS.
M( HAD THE RISKCT ANO
nuNiswror UMH|
ANO MS ACTIVITY IN
BCNAir or Trio NIMOU
CONTMOum HUCNT»
KM IMANCirATtON.
LOCALS MUST PURGE COMMUNISTS
OUT OF THEIR MEMBERSHIP IF
THERE BE ANY, SAYS GOOGE
TAMPA, Fla., Sept. 9.—George L.
Googe, southern representative of ]
the American Federation of Labor,1
warned officials of four local unions!
of Cigar Makers here last week to'
rid their unions of meddlesome Com*
raunist influences immediately, or!
find themselves behind the eight*
ball. The local unions have been sus*
pended from the Tampa Central I
Trades and Labor Council because of
alleged Communists influences and i
activities in the local unions. A
hearing was held, which Mr. Googe'
attended, for the purpose of bearing
evidence against the suspended local
unions.
It was at the conclusion of the hear
ing that Mr. Googe mads tbs plain
statements to the officers of the lo
cals involved. The evidence has been
transmitted to President Green for
presentation to the Executive Coun
cil.
It was in evidence that the Cigar
Makers Local Unions had supported
and sent delegates to Communist and
CIO sponsored meetings.
."The Communists do not want to
help the Cigar Makers' Union, or any
other Union, in the task of improv
ing conditions of labor. All they want
to do is to use our local unions for
their hellish purpose of spreading rev
olution, and the Communists cannot
and shall not use our affiliated A. F.
of L. Unions for such unholy and un
American purposes. The American
Federation of Labor has never want
ed to have anything to do with Com
mnniata, does not want to have any*
thing to do with them now, and never
will want them. If any of the officer*
of these local onions are aiding and
abetting Communists, such officers
and members will soon find themselves
behind the eight ball," Mr. Googe
said.
“When you find Communists get
ting into your organizations and
starting their activities, get rid of
them, cold-cock them, if that is the
only way you can get rid of them.
We cannot afford to have oar affil
iated local unions under suspicion
of harboring Communists, when an
good citizens in the American Feder
ation of Labor and in all walks of
life are so tremendously concerned
with the nobler tssk of preserving our
freedom and our democracy. The
Communists have but one purpose,
and that is the sbsolute snd utter de
struction of our democracy and our
freedom. Wo will not tolerate any a*>
filiated local union hero or anywhere
else lendinn the $ood name of the
American Federation of Labor to the
Communists to be used in their hellish
scheme to overthrow the very democ
racy which is tolerating them a* resi
dents of this free land. If any of our
members love Rusisa and its red flag
and philosophy of Communism more
than they love the freedom and secur
ity of America, let them go to Russia
where thev can get their bellies full
of that dope.”
Union Chief Warns
Organized Labor
To Be Reasonable
WASHINGTON, Sept. 10—
Daniel J. Tobin, president of the
International Brotherhood of
Teamsters, told organised labor
Monday not to assume it had be
come “all powerful" in thin coun
try.
In a speech to 1,6*0 delegates
at the Brotherhood's convention.
Tobin called the development of
the "all powerful" idea the
“danger which confronts the la
■ hor movement"
labor and its leaders, ho de
clared, reached this point in their
thinking because "things are com
ing too easy for the workers."
He coupled with his warning
an appeal to the organised truck
drivers of the United States and
Canada to "listen to reason" in
their dealings with employers.
Gov. Hoey Holds
To November 28
As Thanksgiving
RALEIGH, Sept. 10—The tradi
tional last Thursday in November
again will be North Carolina’s official,
Thanksgiving Day.
Governor Hoey said Tuesday he
would later issue a proclamation di
recting that the last Thursday in
November be observed as Thanksgiv
ing. Last year he also declined to
follow President Roosevelt in moving
the observance up one week.
The Governor wrote Willard Dowell,
secretary of the North Carolina Mer
chants Association, thanking him for
a copy of a resolution adopted by the
association urging that the third
Thursday be proclaimed as Thanksgiv
ing to "give S longer period for
Christmas shopping.”
“I am thoroughly sympathetic with
any move to increase the business of
our merchants," Hoey, "but I see no
reason why they should wait until
Thanksgiving Day to display their
Christmas goods or to open the Christ
mas goods or to open the Christmas;
sales. Last year merchants in Raleigh
and many other places in the state de
cided upon an earlier date for opening
the Christmas sales and it worked
Splendidly.
“I feel very strongly about Thanks- <
giving Day. It is not a commercial
event or observance. For 76 years
there has been an unbroken obeerv-l
ance of this day in North Carolina on I
the last Thursday in November, and'
1 see no sufficient reason for a change
now. Accordingly, at the proper time
I shall designate this traditional day
again this year."
Subscribe for tbs Journal
Carolina Mills
Given Over Million
Gov’t Contracts
WASHINGTON, Sept. 7—North
Carotlina woolen mills wars celled
upon to do their part yesterday to
keep the new army wane. Thro*
Arms were awarded national detente
contracts by the War Department for
woolen blankets totaling more than
a "mi™ dollars.
The largest contract was awarded
to the Chatham Manufacturing
Company of SUdn, N. C., who will
manufacture fSftUW worth of the
olive drab blanket*
The Marshall Field * Company of
Spray will furnish $267,586 worth and
the Leaksville Woolen mills of Char
lotte, $89,850 onion.
The Leaksville contract is one of the
largest contracts that has gone to a
Charlotte firm under the national de
fense program. The blankets will he
delivered to the quartermaster corps
of the army.
The Cameron Bedding ft Msnufsc
turing Company of Cameron, 8. C.,
was awarded a contract to supply
cotton mattress for $18,000.—Spedid
to Charlotte Obeerver.
Shunned by Former Wife,
Kills Self With Dynamite
BUTTS, MONT.—Frank Mingus,
3S years old, was killed lastalffat
by a dynamite charge. PatMfanaa
Cyril Kohn said Mingus set it eft la
a downtown hotel after faOtag to ef
fect a reconciliation with ito di
vorced wife.
Kohn and Mrs. J. R. Marta, «,
mother of Mingus' fonaar wtfU,
were injured.
Kohn went to the hotel after Mn.
Martin and her daughter, Mre. Lsla
Mingus, complained that MJngrt
was molesting them. Mingus ran
into a bathroom. Kohn said he or
dered Mingus to corns out, aad a
few seconds later heard an eaplo
sion.
Woman Guest Comes Just
In Thus to Moot Thief
OKLAHOMA CITY, QKLA.—**De
you folks know there is a stran**
man in the house?" said Mrs. L.
Glass, a dinner guest, to her
She had seen him standing in a i
way, but thought at first ha
be the son of lira. J. C.
whoee guest she was. ...
glared at bar, with hla
jammed tightly in his coat
ahe decided he wasn’t As:
lerton glanced at him, _ _
■trolled leisurely from the deer,
paused to pick up her purse with M
in it, and than walked out he hart
Subscribe For the Journal
THE LABOR PRESS
The labor press Is a sentinel on guard for the
Every possible effort should bo fires in
yoor pabUeation may be strengthened for still
which lies ahead.
Your labor press raiders an incalculable service to
who won. We cannot too strongly urge our fallow
and friends to give loyal and tangible support. No
avenue of education is available to the trade —tm
lent than your labor press. The community which N
its Union paper reflects that co-operation through 1
more effective local unions, councils and central bodies.
    

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