North Carolina Newspapers

    TkaONLY REALLY INDEPENDENT WEEKLY is Mtcklwbirt Q—ty
Far a W«
Its
tfca LARGEST BUYING POWER tm
Official Orgaa CastraJ
Labor L'aioo; (tending far
the A. F. of L.
Truthful, Honest, Impartial
Che Charlotte labor Journal
Patroaiao oar
tisara. Thor Maka YOU*
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Endorsed by tha N. C. State Fodara
tloa of Labor
AND DIXIE FARM NEWS
TMth Tmc Of Coatiai
Pa bication
Endeavoring to Serve the M<
VOL. X—NO. 24
fOWR ASVMflllMINf IS TNt JSVSSAi M S
iMVUTHIItt
CHARLOTTE, N. G, THURSDAY, OCTOBER S, 1940
UN Pw Y«r
AJN incredible richness and generosity,
yon have given birth to the perfumed orange
groves of Florida and California, the waving
wheat and com fields of the Middlewestern
plains, the white cotton fields of the South
and the rolling expanse of the Eastern farmlands where
tranquillity and peace nourish the American principle of
individual initiative against collective regimentation*
In your bosom, you have stored for our welfare all the
minerals which American genius gratefully receives and
transforms into peaceful instruments by which we live
the most abundant life known in the history of mankind.
You have given seed to and nurtured our priceless heri
tage of freedom of religious worship, free speech, free
assembly and a free, enlightened press. With your benefi
cence, we have learned tolerance from the intolerant.
Such soil, such land, we are thankful to be born on, eter
nally grateful to live on, and unyieldingly defiant to die'
on, if need be, to save our beloved land from the brutal p
rape which threatens to plunge the whole world towards
a barbarism and slavery that staggers the imagination of
civilized man. We are proud to be part of the first line
of defense of American liberties ... to always stand
militantly at the side of every true American against the Kf
inroads of doctrines seeking to destroy America’s price
less heritage.
*
MANY CITIES ARE TAKING STEPS
TO SAVE JOBS OF THEIR EMPLOYES
WILL BE REPLACED ON RETURN
CHICAGO.—New York City, Mil
waukee, Portland, Ore., San Fran-!
cisco and Galesburg:, 111., are among
the cities taking: steps, either through
civil service commission rulnigs, to
protect the jobs of city employes called
into military or national defense serv
ice, the American Municipal Associa
tion reports.
The New York City action was
taken by the Municipal Civil Service
Commission while policies of the oth
er cities were established by ordinance
or are under consideration, New York
City’s civil service policy is as fol
lows :
“Every employe of the city govern
ment who is a member of the Na
tional Guard, Naval Militia, Reserve
Corps, or Federal military, naval or
marine services, is entitled to absent
himself while engaged in the perform
ance of ordered duty.
“For the first 30 days of such or
dered duty he will receive his city sal
ary and for periods of over 30 days'
he will receive - - - the difference be
tween his military compensation and
his regular city salary. |
“Vacation and sick leave accrued
prior to the date of service are pre
served for the employe called to ac-|
tive duty.”
Promotion rights are preserved for
oersons on military duty, according to
New York City civil service policy.
TYPO AUXILIARY MEETS
ON MONDAY OCTOBER 7TH
WITH MRS. A. B. FURR
The Woman’s Auxiliary of Char
lotte Typographical Union will meet
Monday, October 7, at 7:30 P. M. with
Mrs. A. B. Furr, 2516 Westmoreland
avenue. Mrs. Charles Barker will be
co-hostess. Business of importance
is to be transacted, along with the so
cial period, which is always a feature
of the meeting of the auxiliary.
Explorers of Babylonian ruins re
vealed inscriptions of a boast by King
Nebuchasnezur, that he had paved
the streets of the dty with asphalt.
I
W. W. SMITH ELECTED
HEAD OF TOBACCO WORKERS
Louisville, Ky.—W. Warren Smith
was elected President of the Tobacco
Workers International Union, Robert
Petree, Secretary-Treasurer and El
mer Keen, senior Vice-President, at
the union’s convention here.
Mr. Smith is President of Local 186
in Louisville, Petree hails from Win
ston-Salem, N. C., and Keen comes
from St Louis.
Former President E. Lewis Evans
was retired on pension and will re
main a life-time honorary member of
the internationaL
JEROME JONES
A martyr has passed away. A man whose life has been
a benefaction; a man whom Labor in the South owes much;
a man who for more than half a century has been a sacrifice
for his fellow man. He was never of an antagonistic mood;
but hewed to the line letting the chips fall where they may,
as far as the rights of the worker were concerned, being a
staunch believer in the principles of the A. F. of L. His
church life was exemplary, being always steadfast and a
worker in the vineyard. Slim in stature, but a giant in
thought and direction, Samuel Gompers saw in Jerome Jones
a leader of men, and his vision was not wrong, for he worked
unremittantly for organization, and wielded a pen that car*
ried weight. He served Labor in every office that the Georgia
State Federation could give him, being president emeritus,
at the time of his death of the State A. F. of L.
Last March this writer sat with Jerome Jones at a ban*
banquet given by him to the Southern Labor Press, Frank
Morrison, former secretary-treasurer of the A. F. of L. was
there, he being an I. T. U. man, too, and it was a feast of
reason and food for thought throughout. Each guest of the
Labor Press was called upon for a talk.
Frank Morrison introduced Jerome Jones in as touching
a talk as we have ever heard, and Jerome Jones, with the
years of labor upon his shoulders responded with a talk that
must have sapped his strength, but the fire was in his eye;
enthusiasm was in his every gesture, for he was living over
again the years he had spent in a battle, not for Jerome
Jones, but for his fellowman.
. Labor has lost a friend; the A. F. of L. has lost a staunch
adherent; Atlanta has lost a noble citizen, and humanity
has lost one of its sweetest characters.
A. F. L. ALARMED AT WORK TRAINING
FEARS FIELD WILL BE FLOODED
BY “HALF-TRAINED” WORKERS
WASHINGTON, Sept. 30.—Robert J. Watt, international rep
resentative of the A. F. L., said Monday that labor was concerned
about *the possible flooding of the employment market with half
trained, low-priced youths while there are still thousands of well
equipped mechanics looking for employment" under the national de
fense program.
In an article written for the American Federationist, publication
of the American Federation of Labor, Watts said:
“There is continued and increasing confusion in the minds ef
workers throughout the country about what that National Advisory
Defense commission is trying to do about training workers for do
feme Jobs. Workers are finding it difficult to understand the re
lationship to defense and the relationship to each other of the train
ing programs of the Works Progress administration. National Youth
administration. Civilian Conservation corps. United States Office ef
Education, and the apprenticeship section of the United States De
partment of Labor." »
Watts urged “wider participation by organised labor" in the
formulation of national defense policies of “vital concern to workers."
J. A. WOLL APPOINTED
U. S. ATTORNEY IN CHICAGO
WASHINGTON, D. C.^J. Albert
Woll, son of Vice-President Matthew
Woll, of the American Federation of
Labor, was nominated by President
Roosevelt as United States attorney
at Chicago to succeed William J.
Campbell, whose nomination to the
federal District court in Chicago was
sent to the senate at the same time.
Woll, who is thirty-six, was ap
pointed a special assistant to the U.
S. Attorney General in 1984 and has
served in Washington since February,
11934, as head of the Commercial
Frauds Unit of the Department of
Justice.
AFL WHEEL WORKER8 WIN
BY 894 TO 42 VOTE
TOLEDO, 0.—W. H. Wbetro, Am
ncan Federation of Labor organiser,
announced that member* of Federal
Local 18628 won an overwhelming vic
tory in a Labor Board election amour
employes of
Metal Wheel
894 for the A
dependent ui
the American Nat_
Company. The vote waa
npany.
FL focal to
don.
42 for an In
    

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