North Carolina Newspapers

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tlw LARGEST BPTPfC POWER fa
AND DIXIE FARM NEWS
Endeavoring to Serve tke Ma$m
CHARLOTTE, N. C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1940
3240 Par Yaar
Official Oran Caatral
Laker Lain; aUatiaf far
tlw A. W. af L.
Truthful, Honest, Impartial
VOL. X—NO. 25
C. L 0. SPLITS AFTER JOHN L LEWIS
DECLARES FOR WENDELL WILLKIE;
PRES. GREEN, A. F. OF L. SAYS RANKS
ARE TORN WITH MUCH DISSENSION
WASHINGTON, Oct. 27—The Roosevelt Administration
struck buck yesterday at John L. Lewis’ denunciation of the New
Deal and support of Wendell Willkie while evidence piled up that
a deep political schism had developed in the CIO itself.
Stephen Early, Presidential secretary, said Lewis had “chosen
to go down the lonely road.” Many CIO leaders, Early declared,
had “repudiated” Lewis’ stand in messages to President Roosevelt,
Secretary of State Hull said that Lewis was “100 par cent
wrong in his effort to prejudice the American people by the has*
less charge that President Roosevelt is seeking to get this nation
into war.”
GREEN’S COMMENT
The Lewis expression brought com
ment, too, from William Green, presi
dent of the American Federation of
Labor.
The CIO, he said, was “torn with
dissension, divided politically because
its leaders seek to compel it to support
a political party.” The AFL, he add
ed, “has evolived and fololwed a non
partisan political party."
Some officials of the United Mine
Workers, foundation stone of the CIO
organisation, disagreed with Lewis,
Hugh V. Brown, president of District
Seven, a Hazelton, Pa., unit and one
of the big UMW locals, said the dis
trict membership would “go down the
alley battling” for Roosevelt. On the
other hand, Ray Edmundson, Illinois
district president of the UMW, made
public a resolution by sixteen UMW
officials pledging support of Lewis
and a '‘vigorous campaign" again a
third term for President Roosevelt.
Some other examples of the split in
the CIO were:
The executive board of Local 601 of
the United Electrical, Radio and Ma
chine Workers at the Pittsburgh
Westinghouse plant, which claims t,
be the biggest CIO local in the coun
try. voted to reject Lewis’ plea for
Wilkie. Henry Johnson, assistant na
tional director of the CIO Packing
house Workers Organizing Commit
tee, announced that officers and mem
bers of fourteen locals had approved
a resolution to “unanimously endorse?'
Lewis.
DU BIN SKY BLASTS AT
JOHN L. LEWIS
NEW YORK, Oct. 27.—David Du
binslcy declared last night that John
L. Lewis “stands exposed before the
entire labor movement as a person
who would cast labor’s interests to
the winds to satisfy his swollen ego.”
Dubinsky, a founder and former
vice-president of the CIO who led
his union of 266,000 clothing work
ers back into the American Federation
of Labor, asserted that Lewis, in in
dorsing the candidacy of Wendell L.
Willkie, “did not even speak for his
CIO unions.”
“The automobile workers, the tex
tile workers, the rubber workers, the
clothing workers, and many other CIO
unions, representing the bulk of the
CIO membership, are out campaign
ing for President Roosevelt and the
New Deal,” said Dukinsky, president
of the powerful International Ladies*
Garment Workers' Union.
“In Pennsylvania and Ohio mining
towns it is reported the miners are
decorating Mr. Lewis' pictures with
black mrepe,’ 'he continued.
THE MARCH OF LABOR
Aft Itu A COAVftHTlOH a* TMH UHOMft jftftft MtUt Hi.
££UU£j&£2? u? aa^iasfisiw^s^
to PftMAND * EQUAL t
M Cotartioi
_ _ mti*m
nom ciwbmih.
Fly the FLAG
THE A. P. OF L. STANDS WITH AND FOR
FLAG
WHERE ORGANIZED LABOR STANDS
BY DR. CHARLES STELZLE
It is a striking fact tht awhen Russian Communism first an
nounced its program to the world, scores of the most outstanding
business corporations .in the United States declared that there was
nothing to he alarmed about—that the Communists were simply
working out a 1 great
While this was going on. Organized Labor was having its own
experiences with Communism in the United States. Its affiliated
national organisations, hi State and Central Labor Bodies were
battling against the inroads being-mode upon their membership by.
sniping agitators, who were being financed in large measure by
funds. The representatives of Industry and Finance who endorsed
—or condoned Communism—mads a serious blunder, but Organised
Labor has stood steadfastly for the principles of American De
Orgaaited Labor similarly apposed Fascism and Nazism with
their programs of. tyranny and oppression, and it has been vindi
cated in its position' with respect to these forms of government and
their leaders. The rest of the- country has finally come to the posi
tion which Organised Labor had long ago taken. I recall the action
taken against even a milder form of radicalism at the first con
vention of the A..F. of L. which I attended as a fraternal delegate
thirty-six years ago, and at later conventions of other labor bodies.
Why should Organised Labor have taken this position on eco
nomic end political issues, when others who were assumed to bo
wiser and- more statesmanlike Stood for philosophies which havs
proven themselves totally leaden sate? Because Organized Labor
has always been vehemently • opposed to the outrageous eras Mas
practiced upon helpless people by the rulers of totalitarian govern
ments; because Organized Labs; instinctively believes in freedom
from oppression and despair of every kind and has consistently
been fighting for it for a hundred years; because Organized Labor
seeks to raise the level of living of all workers, regardless of their
race, their creed, their color, or their previous condition of servitude.
With’this deep human interest, high purpose, and practical pro
gram as its ideal. Organised Libor cannot be satisfied with any
philosophy or any government which further debases any human
being who is suffering from injustice or oppression from any source
which may be depriving him.- of his rights and privileges as a free
citizen.
Roy Hudson Meets ,
Untimely Death I
In A foul Mishap.
City Couneilmajr Roy Hudson died
this morning (Thursday) at 1:80
o’clock in the Gaffney, S. C., hospital
of injuries received In an accident on
a Southern Railway locomotive pi
Blacksburg, S. C., Tuesday. *
The injuries were reported to have
been received when Mr. Hudson, was
crushed between a water tank spout
and the-cab of an engine, on which Jmf
was serving as fireman. He suffered t
five fractured ribs and a crushed and
Uidocated shoulder.
At the hospital when he died were
members of hia family, Mayor Ben
Douglas, Fi«s Chief-Hendrix Palmer,
and City Attorney J. M. Scarborough
and Mr*. Scarborough. The city of
ficials hurried to Ga'rfney last night
when they received word that Mr.
Hudson’s condition was Critical?
Mr. Hudson, who Operated a grocery
store at 416 West Seventh street, was
also a railroad man and until a few
months ago was on leave. He was re
called and had for several months
been making frequent runs as a fire
man. 7
W. Roy Hudson was born 41 years
ago in Anson county, near, Lilesville.
He attended the public schools and at
thuage of 17 entered the employ of the
Southern Railway. He lateV moved to
Peachland and came from Peachland
to Charlotte 20 years ago; still in the
employ of the Southern. He worked
at- the Ford plant here for several
years and later entered the grocery
business, operating s store at 416 W.
Seventh street.—Observer, Thursday.
(Mr. Hudson was one of Labors
representatives on the City Council.)
REA HEADS WPA
IN THIS AREA;
WITH IT SINCE 1935
Appointment of David M. Rea of
Charlotte as acting dirsctor~of the
Works Project Administration in the
Charlotte area was announced today
by 43. A. Waldenmsier of Raleigh,
WPA field engineer,’ who recently
has been in charg of the office here.
The vacancy filled by Mr. Res was
created by the illness of T. Purdie
Richardson. '
Mr. Rea has been associated with
the WPA since 1935, lately as con
struction supervisor and formerly as
assistant area director.—News.
More Arrests At 19;
33.3 Per Cent Under
The Age Of 25 Years
WASHINGTON—The menace of
crime to youth continues to iners—e,
according to the Federal Bureau of
Investigation.
More arrests of persona aged 19
were made during the second quarter
of 1940 than for any other single aga
group. This condition has prevailed
since quarterly reports were first
compiled ten years ago, the FBI
states.
Persons under 25 years of age rep
resented 33.3 per cent of more than a
quarter of a million fingerprint ar
rests during the period reported. -
PATRONIZE THOSE
WHO ADVERTISE IN
THE JOURNAL
Three million trees have been plant
ed in Palestine to replace those de
stroyed by vandalism, in the recent
> period of disorder there.
WHOSJHO
IN UNIONS
[ FRAME B. POWERS |
I— — ....I
FRANK B. POWERS
B> Powwi) International
Teles*
a con*
Iiiza
1928
erne*
.and in
_Inter
Mr. Powers is
persistent or
w. wnuv woon confronted
' his tenure of ottce with such
_ etknai iriHm as the
Western Union and Associated
Press.9 The Associated Press is
now under a dosed shop' agree
meat, while Western Union is now
in its organisational stages, with
one partial dosed shop agreement
Ui& ^had
Powers wee sleeted sa President,
and is now approaching the 10/
are induded in thy i
benhip.
Mr. Powers is also a
the Order of
i-m „.
I dologi
Die 10,000
operators
in ISM.
to the
Federation
since 1926.
His address is: Mr. Frank B.
Powers, International President,
The Commercial Telegraphers' Un
ion, 118 South Ashland Boulevard,
Chicago, Illinois.
m
COMMERCIAL _
BUTTOi
Tbs Union Button of the Com
mercial Telegraphers’ Union was
adopted at its first convention in
1902. It is worn in the same man
ner as a fraternal emblem by both
men and women members of the
Commercial Telegraphers’ Union.
It is the only assurance Oat the
telegraphic servieee are Union.
For further information regard
ing Union Labels, Shop Cards and
Service Buttons, write Mr. L M.
Ornburn, Seerotary* Ti
Union Label Trades Dl,_
American Federation of
Building, Washington, D. C.
SELECTIVE SERVICE APPEAL
BOARDS ARE ANNOUNCED BY
GOVERNOR CLYDE R. HOEY
RALEIGH, OCT. 29^—Governor Hocy Monday an
nounced his recommendations for the sevent North Car
olina appeal boards which will be appointed by Presi
dent Rooaevelt to handle appeals arising from the selec
tive service act.
Members of Board No. 5, which includes Mecklen
burg, Anson, Cabarrus, Cleveland, Lincoln, Blthnwui,
Stanly, and Union counties, recommended by Governor
Hoey were D. E. Henderson, of Charlotte, R. T. LeGrand,
of Shelby, Or. L. N. Glenn, of Gastonia, Claude L, illhie.
of Charlotte, and James A. Hardison of Wadesboro.
Each board will have five members including a law
yer and a physician. Any person drafted may appeal
from the decision of his local board, but the appeal bonds
will hear such cases from a written record, and the appel
lant will not make a personal appearance.
Appeals made on grounds of physical disability wfll
be decided by a medical board, which has not yet been
appointed.
Members of each appeal board wfll elect their own
chairman and secretary, and will decide upon their head
quarters at some point in their district. They wfll re
ceive no pay, but may employ clerical assistance, which
will be paid by the government.
CHARLOTTE EXPOSITION AND
FOOD SHOW IS TO OPEN ON
WEDNESDAY NIGHT, NOV. 6TH
!
The Charlotte Exposition and Food
Show, Fifteenth Annual Affair, con
ducted by the Charlotte Retail Groc
ers Association, will open tis doors at
7:00 P. M. Wednesday evening, Nov
ember 6, with the Central High School
band playing in front of the Auditor
rium amidst a great array of flags
and lights.
The show in past years has been
known for its unusual vaudeville at
tractions brought to Charlotte and
this year there will be no exception
because some of the outstanding acts
in the country have been'engaged for
the show. The show will beheaded by
Dealt Hudson and the Clubmen and
will feature among the acts blond,
curly-headed Gordon Irving, 2H-year
marvel in trick bicycle riding. Little
Gonten* ha* traveled more than 13b,
000 miles in the show business and
holds the record of the youngest tricy
cle rider in America making his first
appearance on the stage at the age
of 20 months.
Another feature act of the occasion
wil lbe Tosca Canestrelli, voted queen
of the circus for 1940, who is said to
be the world’s only bounding rope
sensation. Tosca is as much at home
on the rope as most people are on the
ground. Another feature of the show
will be Captain Tiebor and his famous
trained seals, one of the most out
standing seal acts on the road today.
'The opening of the show will be fea
tured by a special Reyne of the Poole
Dancing School, and other acta will be
arranged by various changes during
show.
The annual Baby Show will be eon
ducted this year under the Sponsor
ship of the King’s Daughters and win
ners in the contest will receive silver
loving cups and other prises. The
Baby Show will be conducted on Mon
day, Tuesday and Wednesday, Novem
ber ll, 12 and 18.
Another outstanding feature of the
afternoon show this year begins Mon
day of the second week which will be
free Bingo games which will be given
to all patrons attending the after
noon performances in addition to the
vaudeville and it is expected/ that an
many as 15,000 people wfll play BfeSCb
each afterpoon during the now as
guests of the Home Service Stores.
The usual show prises will be given
away including a brand new 1941
Nash automobile.
The Food Show Committee this
year is composed of P. L. Marshall,
president; N. J. Covington, treas
urer; C. M. Kiser, past president;
James B. Vogler, secretary and direc
tor, and W. A. McFarland, assistant
director.
The show in the east years has
been widely attended by people from
a radius of fifty miles. Over 75,000
people attended the show last year.
Appeal Draft Board
Goes Into Action
To Elect Chairman
While loial draft boards were get
ting matters arranged for receiving
the master order list from Washing
ton, which it will be necessary to have
before questionnaires may be sent to
men' registered for selective military
service, members of a newly-appointed
appeal board, representing eight coun
ties, arranged to meet here today and
organise.
This appeal board is composed of
D. E. Henderson and Claude L. Al
bea, of Charlotte, R. T. LeGrand, of
Shelby, Dr. L. N. Glenn, of Gastonia,
and Janies A. Hardison, of Wadesboro.
They represent Mecklenburg, Anson,
Cabarrus, Cleveland, Lincoln, Rich
mond, Stanly, and Union counties and
form appeal board No. K. There are
seven such boards in the stats. The
members were appointed by Governor
Clyde Hoey.
Mr. Henderson said yesterday that
it planned to meet today in a roans-in
the Charlotte Sanatorium, when Mr.
LeGrand is a patient, and organise.
Organization will consist of slotting a
chairman, vice-chairman, and secre
tary and select a headquarters office
for the board. It appeared probable
that Charlotte would be selected as
headquarters, being centrally located.
—Observer, Thursday.
NOTICE TO SKEPTICAL!
BUSINESS WEEK, a national weekly publication for bud*
neea men, in its iateet issue baa this comment contained! in
a story on the Labor Press: “In most cases the paper to taken
home, carefully and sometimes laboriously read and reread,
for Labor Editors fill their sheets with information done to
the bread and butter of tbeir readers.”
EVERYMAN’S EPITAPH
Here I m underground.
Howjnuch happier my spirit new
If I had tried just a little harder
While the (round was under ne.
—P. M. i—
Subscribe For the Journal
r
I do tho very but I
and I mu to
tiU the end. If tho
out all right, what
me won’t
anything.—.
UNFAIR TO ORGANIZED LABOR
QUALITY BOTTLING CO.
N. C.
Tfcg bottlers of Jacob Rupert
North Carolina, is unfair to organised
Uon is given The Journal by the Bi
840, and members and friends of
, sold in the State
labor. This
Central Labor Union has
Rnpert Beer on the aafair list 100 pm
in the
    

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