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VOL. X—NO. 26
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CHARLOTTE, N. C„ THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7,1940
LAST RITES FOR ROY HUDSON
HELD FRIDAY AFTERNOON;
A FRIEND OF LABOR PASSES
Funeral nrrvices for City Council*
■an W. Roy Hudson, 42, who died in
a Gaffney, 8. C„ hospital early Thurs
day Morning of injuries received in a
railroad accident Tuesday afternoon
at Blacksburg, S. C„ were held at the
Douglas and Sing Funeral Hose here
this afternoon at 4 o’clock.
The Rev. Dr. Lather Little, pastor
of First Baptist Church, conducted the
services and burial was in Elmwood
Cemetery.
Pallbearers were John F. Boyd, J.
M. Scarborough, George Kendall.
Walter Smith, James W. Armstrong,
and G. D. Moore. Honorary pallbear
ers included members of the City
Council, the Railroad Brotherhood and
the Charlotte Central Labor Union.
m- HJDfOlf
Office* it the City Hall were cloeed
at S o'clock in tke afternoon in defer*
cnee to the fnneral. Tke building was
draped in mourning and the City flag
above the building flew at half-maat
Mr. Hudson. a native of Anaon
County, entered the service of the
Southern Railway at the ago of aev
enteen. Operating a grocery store at
416 W. Seventh Street, he made fre
quent tripe aa a locomotive fireman
for the Southern in order to remain
in good standing. It waa on one of
these Tuesday that he was fatally in
jured when he was caught between
his engine and a water-tank spout.
He is survived by Us widow, for
merly Miss Altahlee Thomas of Peach
land; two sons, Roy Hudson, Jr., of
Charlotte and Lamont Hudson, a stu
dent at Pfeiffer College;, one sister,
Mrs. May D. Redfern of Peachland,
and one brother, Claude J. Hudson, of
Charlotte.
MMMMMMUMMUMMMMWMa
Popular, Electoral
Vote Returns To
Thursday, 2 A. M.
On Thursday morning at 2
O’clock the A. P. gave out the fol
lowing electoral and popular vote
for President:
Pop. vote for Roosevelt_25,867,666
Pop. vote for Willkie.. .21,792452
Electoral votes, Roosevelt_468
A Whittier, California, business es
tablishment has removed 46 swastikas
from in front and sides of the build
ing at the cost of $2,600. A well
known Southwest plumbing concern
recently spent many thousand dollars
in publishing a new catalog because
its trademark had been the Nasi em
blem.
MMMaMMMMMMMAMMM
Voting Units ..
Units Reporting
Electoral votes, WiUkie
62
THE MARCH OF LABOR
v if «*t os. U&v&m uft*
UMR
I
Fly the FLAG
THE A. F. OF L. STANDS WITH AND FOR THE FLAG.
ALL HAIL TO THE CHIEF
FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT
FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT
A President Who Has Served the People Well and Has Given
Labor A Break.
Now that the election is over we can all set back and
give our nerves a rest, and feel assured that the country is
“safe for democracy,” Roosevelt breaks precedent by being
elected for a third term. A tried friend, and true, of the
workers, and of the masses, he will carry forward the prin
ciples of the New Deal as built up, and a Fair Deal is assured
to Big Business and Capital. It is better for all of us, in our
opinion, that horses were not swapped in the middle of the
stream, and that Mr. Roosevdt is permitted to carry out a
policy outlined to meet these farbulous times which are now
upon us. With faith in him ap a leader and as an American,
let us all hold up his haads&taaifiitg .petty jealousies and
faultfinding to the wind and allow our American, patriotism
and endeavor to rise to the highest ebb. ALL HAUL TO THE
CHIEF—FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT, AND A
SPIRITED AMERICA.
Senate and House Control In Hands
Of Democrats—226 House Seats;
Have Total 59 Seats Out Of The 96
WASHINGTON, Nov. 6.—The Dem
ocrats, riding a tide of vote* with
President Roosevelt, kept control of
both House and Senate in Tuesday's
election.
An official tabulation at 8:10 A. M.
(E.S.T.) showed they had won 226
House seats, for more than a majority,
to 109 for the Republicans. In addi
tion ,one incumbent American Labor
ite was re-elected. A majority is 218.1
The Democrats have held control of
the House since John N. Garer, now
Vice-President, was chosen Speaker
in 1931 ,and of the Senate since vic
tors in the first Roosevelt landslide of
1932 took office on March 4, 1988.
Their majority in the new Senate,
convening next January 8, was hardly
in danger but any vestige of doubt
was eliminated when the tabulation
showed they had won at least fiftesn
of the 28 Democratic seats at stake in
this year's balloting.
Theta added to 44 holdover
wats. The Senate hae M meat
which a third art filled tit
rears.
Republicans, with fifteen hoi
retained at laaet file of the
Beats at ttehe and captured tv
sow hold by Pew 81 rata. Thi
them a tentative Woe of *2 teal
»f their victories dates bath to
House, in I
crate, it 1<
LASTING TALUS ^
The successful resistance of the An>hM Federation
of Labor to the introduction of Communist purposes and
methods in the labor movement was an outstanding patri
otic accomplishment Its lasting value will be recognised
more and more as time passes.—John P. Frey.
Brewery Workers
In Atlanta Sigq
3 New Contracts
Local Union No. WO has signed
three new contracts this year with in
creased wages and improved condi
tions in each. It will probably be of
interest to the Labor world to know
the salesmen of the Atlantic Brew
ery has been placed on a five-day, 40
hoar week after a short period of nego
tiations between the officials and the
company anion. Besides this all
employes of the Atlantic Brewery
eeived a a
wage increase this year. Can
ada Dry Ginger Ale employes received
vacation with
an additional week’s
pay and a reduction in working hears.
Employes of the Boy B. Bangui Com
pany received increased wages, a paid
vacation and improved working condi
tions.—Journal of Labor, Atlanta.
Patronize Journal Advertiser*
A 650,000 DECLINE
IN UNEMPLOYM1
Washington, not.
American Federation of
ted last week that
:reaaed 660.000 in
largest redaction in any tingle :
nee April, 1986” j
“The unemployment total for the
nation in September was 8,544400
compared to 9,194,000 in August and
0*439,000 in September, 1989r the A.
F. L. statement said.
'Employment gains in September
re largely due to the stimulating
effect-on industry of defense program
activities together with war orders
from abroad and the customary fall
pick-up."
PATRONIZE IH08E
WHO ADVERTISE IN
THE JOURNAL
PATRON]
B
JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
NEW A. F. OF L LOCAL WESTERN
UNION EMPLOYES AFFILIATE
WITH CENTRAL LABOR UNION;
CARPENTERS’ ORGANIZER TALES
MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING
NOVEMBER (. IMF
The meeting was opened with in
vocation by Brother Campbell, and the
pledge of allegiance to the Flag was
given. The meeting was very well at
tended. The minutes of the previous
meeting were read and approved. Two
delegates from the Telegraphers
union, Brothers J. R. Smith and T. J.
Griffin, were obligated along with
Firefighters. G W. Hopkins, all of
whose credentials were favorably re
ceived, and given a hearty round of
applause. The minutes of the Ex
ecutive Board meeting re the skating
area dedication were approved in toto.
Collections were reported. Wiring is
all that remains for the completion of
the project. The committee to dedi
cate same at 4 P. M. Armistice are
£*te same at 4 P.M. Armistice Day are
Brothers Moore, Deeee, Ed Witter, J.
The resignation of M. L. McRorie
as organizer for the Central Body,
received, per report of the eom
nuttee, with the closing satisfactory
to all bodies concerned.
The resolution re the death of Roy
Hudson were unanimously passed and
hereby made a part of the minutes.
Various regular and standing com
mittees reported as usual with work
progressing along the many different
linn covered by the locals affiliated
with the Centra] Body. The reports
8 an<* ^•f*tes were large and
varied.
The strike at Harris Brothers, of the
Teamsters, was reported amicably set
tied to the satisfaction of all
ed.
The Telegraphers reported they had
been recognised as the bargaining
unit, and were roundly applauded on
this their first report at the Char
lotte Central Labor Union.
The . Express Clerks resorted
$4,990.10 received in back pay. The
Bakery workers reported negotiations
going on favorably with Penders. A
letter from the State Federation of
Labor re State Legislation was ordered
turned over to the Legislative
mir.tee for action. A letter thantW
the Telegraphers for their affilia
tion will be sent by the secretary.
The usual thanks and compliments
were given the new local with bois
terous applause. The Firefighters
reported a new charter 100% install
ed, st High Point with other points
being organised, and that Charlotte
• ^e State headquarters of the new
ly formed State Chapter of Firefight
ers with their convention wmiii<r to
Charlotte.
Brother Van Stamps, of the Interna
tional Carpenters Union gave a very
fine down-to-earth talk about uiifffi
conditions in the Building Trades
in North Cardins.
Upon request of the Monroe local of
State Employees Brother Moors was
asked by President Scoggins to fur
ther the work of the special committee
appointed for that purpose.
The meeting then adjourned after
much discussion for the good of the
order.
Wm. S. GREENE,
AFTER NIGHT OF HOPE WILLKIE
CONGRATULATES ROOSEVELT
NEW YORK, Nov. 6—Wendell L. Willkie today talo»
fion ^ ”re8I^ent Roosevelt congratulations on hia re-elec
secretary,
At 10:30 A. M., EST, Willkie’s pre
Jones, gave out the text as follows:
Franklin D. Roosevelt,
President of the United States,
•—;Hyde Part, New York.
it ^^"RTa1 anions on your re-election as President of the
United States. I know that we are both gratified that so
many American citizens participated in the election. I wish
you all personal health and happiness.
Cordially,
WENDELL L. WILLKIE.
Business Firms
In Charlotte Are
Reacting To Wage
Hour Week Law,
Bftana
idly adjusting!
I . worlc wi
in Charlotte and
to tiie Carolines are rap*
themselves to the 40
_ which under the
Wage and Hour Act became effective
a week age, Fred L. Coxe, Jr., act
ing. supervisor at the Wage and Hour
office here said yesterday.
Mr. Coxe said officials had
pleased with the spirit of co-operation
that prevailed among employers, and
that while, there were some who had
„.! yet tolly complied with provisions
of the act officials of the Charlotte
office had found that employers who
had not complied were failing to do
so largely bemuse they were not fully
informed, or had misconstrued clauses
of the act The office answers many
satis dailv from employers who are
seeking information as to whetherjtsf
not they are covered
portion of the tow
are made
fully understand pi
by the a^Mr.
r_ tow eom
and a large
it are received
do not
of the
.Bowttor, mid Mr. Coxe, s
plahre made by an employe is investi
gated, and in accordance with provi
stons of the regulations the identity
of tiie complaint is held in strictest
confidence.—News.
ether.
RESOLUTIONS OF
RESPECT FOR
ROY HUDSON
Charlotte Central Labor Un
ion, in regular meeting aaesm
bled, Wednesday, November 6,
olution of respect and condolence
on the death of Boy Hudson,
which occurred Thursday noon
ing, October Slat:
Resolved, That in the untimely
death of Roy Hudson the City
of Charlotte has lost a rained
servant, Labor has loot a i
friend, and hie family a
and devoted husband i
Hip sudden passing tffehed the
community deeply M® Charlotte
Central Labor Union, and its af
filiated loealajStend tbair deep
est sympstbyto the family in
tr hour of bereavement,
it farther
"r Rnolved, That a copy of these
resolutions be sent to the family
of the deceased, a copy to the
City Council, of which no was a
member, spread upon the min
utes of Charlotte Central Labor
Union, and published In the
Charlotte Labor Journal.
m. l. nan,
W. M. WITTER,
Resolutions Committee.
Charlotte Central Labor Union.
Charlotte, N. C., Nov. «, 1940.
PATRONIZE JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
MMMM
UNFAIR TO ORGANIZED LABOR
QUALITY BOTTLING GO.
Monroe, N. C.
of Jacob Rupert_
North Carolina, is unfair to organised
tioa is siren The Journal bjr the Bi
840, and members and friends of
themselves accordingly.
, sold In the
labor. This
Central Labor Union_
Rupert Beer on the unfair list 100
has concurred In the
    

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