North Carolina Newspapers

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Official Orgaa Ctnl
Labor Union; i
the A. F. of L
Che Charlottr labor Journal
Patronise oar Ainr*
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co-operation.
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Truthful, Honest, Impartial Endorsed by^thoC Btate Fodera
AND DIXIE FARM NEWS
Tenth Tear Of
Endeavoring to Serve the Masses
VOL. X—NO. 27
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•— CHARLOTTE, N. C„ THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1940
92.00 Pw Y.
ALL SET FOR A. F. OF L MEET
AT NEW ORLEANS-THOUSANDS
WILL BE IN ATTENDANCE
NEW ORLEANS, La.—Everything
is all set here for the opening of the
60th annual convention of the Amer
ican Federation of Labor which prom
ises to be one of the most momentous
conclaves in the history of organized
labor.
More than 600 delegates and thou
sands of friends and visitors have ar
rived here and will be on hand in the
New Orleans Municipal Auditorium
on the morning of November 18 when
President William Green raps his
gavel to signalize that the proceedings
are under way.
With the membership of the Amer
ican Federation of Labor at the high
est point of history, with its ranks
united as never before, with its pres
tige in national affairs unchallenged
and with its elected representatives
full of confidence and imbued with
the victory spirit, the convention
meets this year under highly auspic
ious circumstances.
The most important business be
fore the convention will be the de
termination of a policy and program
for labor co-operation with Govern
ment and industry in the national de
fense program.
It is confidently expected that the
American Federation of Labor will
demonstrate convincingly to the coun
try that American worker* are ready
to pitch in with everything they’ve
got to help preserve America as a
free, democratic nation.
Without question, the convention
will take a strong stand against Com
munism, Nazism, Fascism and other
foreign ideologies hostile to democ
racy. It is expected to indorse the
Government’s foreign polecy, especial
ly with regard to extending the full
est possible aid to Great Britain short
of war.
The second great problem facing
the convention is the issue of labor
peace. As a step toward national
unity, the convention will undoubtedly
go on record, as previous conventions
have done, to empower A. F. of L.
officials to negotiate a settlement with
the C. I. 0.
President Roosevelt is planning to
send a message to the convention and
he may take advantage of the oppor
tunity to renew his pleas for a re
united labor movement. The 1939
convention responded unanimously to
the President’s appeal by declaring
that the A. F. of L. peace committee
would be ready to meet and negotiate
with C. I. O. representatives at any
time and any place.
Royal Crown Bot.
Co. At Durham
Signs Contract
Mr. Godwin, business representa
tive of Brewery and Soft Drink Work
ers’ Locals 188 and 188-B, states that
an agreement has been entered into
by the Royal Crown Bottling Co., bot
tlers of Royal Crown Cola, True-Ade,
Seven Up and Nehi Products of Dur
ham, N. C., in addition to the closed
shop contract. The contract calls for
a reduction of seven hours per week
in working hours per man as well
as an increase ranging from $1.60 to
$4.50 in wages per week.
Brewery-Soft Drink
Workers Meet At
Norfolk, Nov. 17th;
To Form Council
The occasion of a special meet
ing for Sunday, Noe. 17, is the
organization of a Brewery Work
ers Council composed of mem
bers from the States of Mary
land, West Virginia, Virginia,
North Carolina, nad the Dis- j
trict of Columbia. There will be
delegates here from all of the
above mentioned States.. All
members of Local 188, are urged j
to attend this meeting.
THE MARCH OF LABOR
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Fly the FLAG
THE A. P. OF L. STANDS WITH AND FOR THE FLAG
BATTLE ON RACKETEERING LOOKED
FOR IN A.F.OFL CONVENTION AT
NEW ORLEANS BEGINNING NOV. 18TH
WASHINGTON, Nov. 11.—Leaden
of the A. F. of L. and the C. I. 0.
are headed for their organisation*
with such momentous questions to the
fore as labor peace, the future leader
ship of the C. I. O., and preventing
racketeering in the labor movement.
The A. F. of L. will convene No
vember 18 in New Orleans and the
C. I. 0. on the same day in Atlantic
City. Leaders of the rival groups
already wife gathering in the conven
tion cities, however, for a week of
preliminary conferences.
Preparations for a gala celebration
of the C. I. O.’s fifth anniversary
may be somewhat dimmed for partK
sans of John L. Lewis since he as
sured a radio audience on October 26
that if President Roosevelt were re
turned to power, he would retire as
C. I. O. president.
A. F. of L. leaders heading south
for their 60th annual convention have
indicated that Lewis’ retirement
probably would be a signal for the
reopening of A. F. of L.-C. I. O. con
ferences looking toward a reunion of
the labor movement.
One of them said it would be a
“golden opportunity” to heal the
breach and that the federation would
make plans to return to the peace con
ference table as soon as possible, per
haps before Christmas.
On the C. I. O. aide, tome backers
of President Roosevelt in the cam
paign said that the group of A. F.
of L. and C. I. 0. leaders on the
National Defense commission labor
policy committee might supply the
necessary pash to get the two sides
talking again about peace.
A "draft Lewis' movement was re
ported under way in the C. I. 0. but
there was strong sentiment for Philip
Murray, now a vice-president, to head
the C. I. 0. in event Lewis did retire.
Should Lewis resign he still would
be a major figure in the C. I. 0.
through his presidency of the United
Mine Workers, one of the largest
C. I. 0. unions.
An indication that the A. F. of L.
might launch a campaign against
racketeering came in an address to
day by John P. Frey, a vice-president,
who told the metal trades convention
at New Orleans that "the time has
come when our position should be
“made clear, definite, and emphatic
so that our trade union membership
and the public will know that we are
determined to prevent any form of
racketeering."
The A. F. of L. executive council
is understood to have given considera
tion to this question at a recent meet
ing and may make some recommenda
tion to the convention.
Store Hours To
Be Lengthened
Effective Dec. 16
A schedule of special business hours
for the Christmas shopping season
was adppted by directors of the Char
lotte Merchants association in month
ly session yesterday.
The new schedule, as announced by
V. P. Rousseau, secretary, becomes
effective December 16. On December
16 and 17 stores will open at regular
hours and close at 7:30 o’clock. From
December 18 through December 23,
stores will open at regular hours and
iem%n ouen nntil^jJO P. M.,
The shopping season win be opened
by a Christmas parade on November
21, which will be postponed one day
in case of rain. R. L. Chapman is
chairman of the parade committee. It
was announced that stores will be
open for business on November 21,
the Federal Thanksgiving, but will
close November 28 for the State
Thanksgiving, as proclaimed by Gov
ernor Hoey.—Observer.
Extending out ten miles from Dia
mond Shoals from Cape Hatteras, N.
C., 200 wrecked vessels lie at the bot
tom of the ocean.
I.A.F.S.E.&M.P.O.
Seventh District Will
Meet In Charlotte
Reports which were declared to re
flect much progress in the organi
sation were submitted at Hotel Char
lotte Sunday at a meeting of repre
sentatives of the Seventh district of
the International Alliance of The
atrical Stage Employees and Motion
picture Operators, a session: which
began at 11 o'clock and ended in the
early afternoon.
W. P. Raoul of Atlanta, interna
Ms
bile, secretary of the Seventh dis
trict. It was essentially a business
meeting..
In attendance were members of
many locals of the organisation from
Virginia, North Carolina, and South
Carolina.
Charlotte local was host to the gath
ering, and from reports did a good job
of it!
North Carolina has a population of
three million, five hundred thousand.
Of this number, fifteen thousand have
Indian names.
FEDERATION STATE COUNTY AND
MUNICIPAL EMPLOYES MEETING
BID FOR RECOGNITION IN N. C.
There is an A. F. of L. affiliate that deserves more con
sideration, and co-operation in this’territory than it has re
ceived, not that Labor has not lent a helping hand, individual
members of other organizations having devoted time to help
the American Federation of State, County and Municipal
Employes. There is a flourishing local of Municipal and
County Employes here in Charlotte, and while the member
ship is not as large as it should be, it is an organization com
posed of whole-hearted unionists, banded together for the
betterment of their condition and to obtain some of the bene
fits received by others in a higher strata.. It is of the State
branch of this organization to which attention would be called.
There is a local of State Highway Workers, close to Charlotte,
whom report discrimination against, and discharge, by. the
overlords, who agree not with anything that savors of a
union. And the present State administration has not seen
fit to take any adverse action in the penalizing and discharge
of Union men—being autocratic of mien and dictorial always.
But, the organization of the S(ate Highway Workers will go
steadily forward, despite obstacles which may be thrown in
the way.
We have at hand a leaflet "Questions and Answers”—
"Facts About the American Federation of State, County and
Municipal Employes.” The Journal is going to publish a part
of it, beginning with—
1. WHAT IS THE A. P. S. C. M. E.1
The American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Em
ployees is a national organisation including in its membership employees
of states, counties, and municipalities. It is affiliated with the Amer
ican Federates of Labor.
2. WHEN WAS IT ORGANIZED?
The A. F. S. C. M. E. was granted a charter as aa autonomous
international union by the American Federation of Labor on October
16, 1936. Many groups now affiliated with the A. F. S. C. M. E. were
in the A, F, of L. for many years as federal locals. Efforts to form a
single national union of these groups were begun several years ago
and were successfully completed when the charter was granted on
October 16, 1936.
3. WHAT ARE THE AIMS AND OBJECTS OF THE A. F. S.
C. M. E.?
As stated in the constitution adopted at a convention of all locals
in Detroit, September 16-19, 1936, the objects are:
a. To promote efficiency in public service generally.
b. To cooperate in giving efficient service te ear respective juris
dictions.
c. Te bring local organisations of state and local employees into
closer relationship so as to fosPtar mutual cooperation,
d. To extend and uphol dthe prindpi oof merit and fitness in public
employment and to promote civil service legislation.
PATRONIZE JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
HIGH COURT UPSETS LABOR BOARDS
POLICY—EMPLOYERS NEED NOT PAY
AGENCIES FOR AID TO WORKERS
WASHINGTON, Nov. 13.—The Su
preme Court yesterday reversed the
Labor board’s policy of requiring em
ployers to reimburse relief agencies
for aid extended to employes declared
to have been illegally discharged.
A 8—2 decision by Chief Justice
Hughes held that the board had no
right to do more than secure restitu
tion of the employes’ losses in pay—
that it could not punish the employer
and that it had no business “to carry
out supposed policies” regarding re
lief and unemployment.
The c“*e„?t i88“e ont of the
“little steel" strike of 1937. The
board declared that the Republic Steel
corporation had unlawfully discharged
some 6,000 employes and ordered the
company to reinstate them with hack
pay, less the sums they had received
from the WPA and other government
“fancies during their idleness.
This difference, which a govern
ment spokesman estimated at $200,
000 to |400,000, the company was or
dered, to pay to the relief agencies
involved. The board has made sim
ilar orders in many other cases, look
ing upon the relief payments as “a
sort of windfall,” in the words of its
counsel, from which neither the em
jloyer nor the workers should ulti
mately benefit.
The Court found that the board
took the view “that the unfair labor
practices of the company (in discharg
in* the employee) m__
losses to the government the
work relief projects" and that it was
up to the board to redress the injury
to the public as well as to the em
ployes.
But the decision termed tUa “a
misconception" of the Wagner act.
“The act is essentially remedial,"
it continued. “It does not
penal program dedaring the L
unfair labor practices to he_
The act does not prescribe penalties
or fines in vindication of public rights
pr provide indemnity against com*
munity losses."
The decision also noted “that the
amounts paid by the governmental
agencies were for sendees actually
performed" and that ‘presumably
these agencies, and through them the
public, received the benefit of sere*
ices reasonably worth the amounts
paid." Thus, payments by an em
ployer to the relief agency would be
“in the nature of penalties* *
the scope of the law.
Justices Black and Douglas . _
sented, saying that “it may well he
said that the policies of the aet will
be effectuated by denying to an of*
fending employer the opportunity of
shifting, to government relief
his
■
cies the burden of supporting_
wrongfully discharged employes.1
Justice Roberts did not participate in
the case.
MINUTES OF CENTRAL LABOR UNXON;
BUILDING TRADES TO GET TOGETHER
AT COURTHOUSE ON DECEMBER 8TH
The meeting was called to order by
President Scoggins and the invocation
given by Brother Campbell, and the
pledge of allegiance to the Flag taken
by all the delegates present. The
minutes of the previous meeting were
read and approved. The roll call of
officers, delegates and locals follow
ed, and even though it was the heav
iest rain of the year, a good attendance
was on hand. '1 Be Secretary reacTthe
letter of thanks to the Telegraphers
which they had asked him to send,
and is hereby made a part of these
minutes. Another date was to be set
by the committee for the Area dedica
tion, as Armistice Day rained the orig
inally planned ceremonies out.
On December 8th, the building
trades are having a Southern get
together, for business purposes, and
some National leaders in the A. F. of
L. are expected to be present. The
plaec is the Courthbuse of the County.
The A. F. of L. men interested are
invited to attend.
Some donations to the deficit of the
Skating Area, advanced by the Central
body were reported from various lo
cals.
The International representative of
the Brewery Workers made an in*
structive address on conditions in Us
field in this territory. Brother Slav
of the Teamsters reported a Union
card promised to Brother McCrosif,
and on Ms motion, Brother ifeCMne
was again voted to have the oneom
pleted part of his organisation vat
finished, as agreed upon at a previous
meeting. Brother McCrorie will help
those locals who ask for Us help, and
no others, as well as do general organ
ization work among the unorganised.
A carnival proposition of Lawrence
Bros. Carnival, Bill Breese, Mgr., was
referred to a committee of Brothers
Moore and Greene. After much discus*
sion for the good of the order, sad
certain matters straightened out, the
meeting adjourned.
WM. S. GREENE, See.
Diver Describes
Wealth Lying on
The Ocean Floor
Fabulous Fortunes Awaiting
Daring Adventurer
With Capital
w
MILWAUKEE.—A fabulous for*
tune lies at the bottom of the ocean
awaiting any adventurer with dar
ing and capital enough to get it.
Max Eugene Nohl, deep sea diver
and inventor, described the wealth !
under the seas in sunken ships and
other sources.
‘In Ufa South Seas,” he said, “I
can take you up in an airplane and
show you 200 wrecked ships lying on
the bottom in the clear water in
less than an hour.”
The six-foot, 29-year-old diver who
made the world's deepest dive, 420
feet, intends to investigate these
wrecks this summer in a combined
salvage and motion picture expedi
tion.
Many of die ships lying on the
ocean floor will prove disappointing,
according to Nohl. Their once valu
able cargoes will be ruined by sea
water, or after hours of dangerous
work the diver wifnfend a safe he
laboriously hauleiL t(K the surface
was ransacked bythe crew before
abandoning ship.
uruu m witn.
But there i* the optimistic side of
the picture, too, Nohl contends.
Some of the cargoes will be intact
and some of the safes will contain
large sums.
He estimated there are 3,800
sunken ships in the South Seas alone
that are worth salvaging.
Another fortune could be made,
the youthful adventurer asserted, in
diving for sponges—which live on
the floor of the ocean.
However, even before beginning
to think of cashing in on this tempt
ing wealth, large capital is needed,
Nohl said. He pointed out that the
necessary diving equipment, sal
vage ship and provisions for a
trained crew, as well as the months
of preparation and foe unfruitful
aearsha*. ran into.* kftafauaaa,
Subscribe For tba Journal
AtMtOCT
laczung tM joo of salvage a
tuna from the sea la tba
volved.
Last summer Nohl
steamer Tarpon In the
It proved to be a lucky
cause the ship’s safe carried a topi
pay roll, but it almost asst the
young diver's life. A
Work lit
Operations had reached the ysM
where most at the wreckage eh
structing the captain's cabin tod
been cleared away. Nohl was wsto
ing on the ship in 110 feat at veto.
“The crew signaled me that mg
time was up on the bottom." Naht
said. “But spurred on by the sa»
citement at knowing that ear to
jective was dose I derided to slay
down another 10 minutes.
“Well, the time stretched toe ana
—two—three hours. Than I started
up in the usual way—stepping to
30 minutes at various stages se that
I would become accustomed to to
changes in pressure gradually.
“At the surface," be rnnttoid.
“I felt fine except for a slight gnaw
ing in my stomach.”
It was the dreadful bends a re
action accompanied by uebearahlo
pain experienced by divers sad Sth
ers who work under pressure and
then return to normal air pressure
too quickly.
He was rushed to a hospital
where, after repeated denes at mat*
phine and several days’ rest, to was
normal again except tot his aims
remained partly paralyzed. De
spite this, he returned to to sal
vage work, finding tot whenever to
was diving bis arms functioned
properly, becoming limp when to
returned to to surface.
“It was worth it," Nohl rnmmint
ed, but he would not reveal to
amount rescued from to to*
I.
IF YOUR SUBSCRIPTION
i IS IN ARREAR8
SEND IN A CHECK
“Keep your temper,” said Moee,” m*
body else wants ft.”
Some people spend half their time
wishing for something. If that half
their tune mere pot into work, maybe
they could get the thing.
    

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