North Carolina Newspapers

    PHILIP PEARL, IN ‘FACING FACTS’
SAYS ARMY IS WAY AHEAD OF
NAVY—GOV’RMT UNDERSTANDS
It seems that some of the Navy
Admirals are out of step, as usual.
The latest to fall by the woyside is
Rear Admiral Ray Spear, who in his
annual report as Chief of the Navy’s
Bureau of Supplies and Accounts,
complains that the Walsh-Healy and
Fair Labor Standards Acts are re
tarding expansion of industrial fa
cilities to meet defense needs.
But it’s not a bit surprising to hear
a Navy Admiral talk like a member
of the Union League Club. In fact,
the hight-ranking officials of our
Navy for a more exclusive set than
any group of pot-bellied plutocrats
in the nation. To some of these Ad
mirals democracy is as foreign as it
is to Adolph Hitler. They are used
to dictatorial methods. As comman
der of a battleship, a squadron or a
fleet, an Admiral stalks the deck with
complete authority. He hears no la
bor problems, he sees no labor prob
lems, he knows no labor problems.
With such a background, it is no won
der that the Admirals find it difficult
to understand the complexities of in
dustrial production where civilian
workers, not men in uniform, are em
ployed.
The time has come to democratize
the Navy. We urge no lessening of
discipine aboard ship. That is neces
sary in peace time as well as in time
of‘war. But we do insist that the ad
ministrative bureaus of the Navy De
partment and their personnel take a
few lessons in democracy, learn what
it’s all about and get back into step
with the Government and its labor
policies.
THE ARMY IS WAY AHEAD
It might do the Navy boys a lot
of good to take a look at what’s hap
pened in the Army. Officials of the
War Department have progressed so
far ahead of their colleagues in the
Navy that they are out of sight.
Under Secretary of War Stimson,
the Army has adopted an enlightened
and progressive policy toward labor.
It has not only given lip service, but
has shown a sincere desire to abide
by the provisions of the labor laws
protecting the standards of the work
ing men and women of America. As
a result, Army defense projects are
being constructed far ahead of sched
ule. A fine spirit of co-operation
exists between organized labor and
the Army.. There has not been a sin
gle strike on any Army defense proj
ect by an. American Federation of La
bor union. In fact, all affected A.
F. of L. unions have gone out of their
way ’ to help the Army speed up its
program and supply the necessary la
bor, even when that meant transport
ing large groups of skilled workers
to communities far from their homes.
We must not forget that America’s
first line of defense is not the Navy
with its warships and its airplanes, nor
the Army with its regiments of drill
ed Soldiers and its mechanized equip
ment, but the army with a small “a”—
the great army of millions of workers
in American factories who are pro
ducing the vast stores of materials
and equipment and new plant capacity
so vital to the defense of our coun
try.
Both the Navy Admirals and the
Army generals are very careful to
provide foa their own men. They have
learned Napoleon’s adage that an
“Army travels on its stomach.” They
know that soliders and sailors, to
fight well must be well-fed, well
housed and in good health.
Then why in the name of what's
reasonable can’t they understand that
it is even more important that the
great army of workers, who consti-j
tute the first line of defense, must
also be well-fed, well-housed and in
good health in, order to construct the
ships and produce the armament with
out which any armed force would be
helpless?
Why in the name of simple logic
can’t they understand that the Fair
Labor Standards Act, the Walsh-Healy
Act and other similar labor laws are
designed merely to provide a mini
mum guarantee of fair conditions to
the army of workers?
THE GOVERNMENT UNDERSTANDS
Fortunately,” the Government of the
United States under the leadership
of President Roosevelt does under
stand these fundamental truths. For
tunately, the leadership of the Ameri
can Federation of Labor is powerful,
influential and aggressive enough to
counteract the ignorant beefs of an
occasional Admiral.
But, unfortunately, such mislead
ing and irrational statements as the
occasional Admiral is likely to make
are seized upon for propoganda pur
poses by greedy industrialists and
their screaming stooges in Congress
to help their short-sighted campaign
for bigger and ever bigger profits out
of the defense program at the expense
of the workers.
This campaign has now reached its
loudest pitch of labor-baiting and the
air is filled with demands for anti
strike laws and repeal of labor-pro
tective laws. Don’t be too deeply
disturbed by all this empty noise and
the wide publicity the subservient
press is giving to the squawks of big
business. Legislation of the type that
would shackle labor has no chance
of adoption in our democracy. It
cannot command more than a few
votes in Congress, it is opposed by the
Administration and it would be over
whelmingly rejected by the great ma
jority of the American people.
But the very fact that another vic
ious anti-labor campaign is under way
; should serve as a warning to labor
to, be on guard. Labor must be reas
I onable, it must be strong, it must be
self-disciplined, it must be 100 per
cent American to continue to command
the respect and support of the Ameri
can people as a whole. This is labor’s
greatest safeguard.
BI-LETS
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AVANT
For QwlHr
COAL
STOKKK
» COAL
IF YOUR SUBSCRIPTION
IS IN ARREARS
SEND IN A CHECK
ZORIC
Dry Cleaning
DOMESTIC LAUNDBY
Phone 8171
It Pays to Trade With
Doggett
Lumber Co.
Ill B. Park Are. Pfcaae 1179
4WWM
Allied Ptg. Crafts
Getting Set For
Meeting, Second
Sunday in Jan.
The second Sunday in January
will see a meeting of the Allied
Printing Crafts in Charlotte, at
which time it is expected that
Woodruff Randolph, secretary
treasurer of the I. T. ,U. and
John B. Haggerty, president of
the Bookbinders, will address the
assembled delegates and guests
at a dinner affair, which will com
bine business with pleasure.
Brothers Stalls and Nixon of No.
338 are putting forth much ef
fort to make this gathering a fra
ternal feast, which will mean
much to the Allied Printing
Crafts in the Carolinas.
CHASE BAG COMPANY
SIGNS PACT WITH UNITED
GARMENT WORKERS
REIDSVILLE, N. C., Dec. 10.—An
agreement was signed here last week
between the Chase Bag Company and
the Local Union of the United Gar
ment Workers of America. An in
crease in pay, vacation with pay, dou
ble time for Sunday work and work
done on holidays, and other advantage
ous provisions for the workers are
included in the agreement. Negotia
tions for the agreement extended over
a long period of time, yet President
Robert Groff, of Local No. 270, and
his committee manifested a persistent
spirit throughout the period of nego
tiations. The Local Union was ably
assisted by Miss Sallie D. Clinebell,
popular and highly respected general
organiser for the United Garment
Workers of America.
Subscribe For the Journal
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Shop electrically NOW! See for yourself. There is
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shopping list . . . The low prices, too, are sure to
please you.
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Tune In WBT 12:45 P. M. Tues., Thurs. and Sat.
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430 South Church St. Phone 2-41C
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PHILIP MORRIS & CO.
WITHDRAWS ADS FROM
NONUNION MAGAZINES
CHICAGO, ILL.—Phillip Morris A Co., well known manufac
turers of cigarettes and pipe tobacco, has withdrawn its advertis
ing irom the two nonunion sports magazines known as National
sportsman and Hunting A Fishing. The company has requested
the Organization Committee of Chicago Printing Trades Unions to
advise the labor press of the country of its action.
• l Sportsman and Hunting A Fishing magazines are
printed by the notoriously anti-union printing concern of R. R. Don
nelley A Sons Company (Lakeside Press), Chicago, against whom
a nation-wide campaign is being carried on by the Chicago printing
trades unions. The campaign has the endorsement of the Ameri
®f Labor as well as that of all state federations of
labor affiliated therewith.
M o™e. Rowing firms still persist in advertising in the nonunion
National Sportsman and Hunting A Fishing magazines despite the
£**»“? $eiJ .products *1“™ been placed on the “We Don’t Pat
°f hundreds of local unions and central bodies through
out ^atlK?aJ DlSpUers Products Corporation, distillers
of Old Grand-Dad whiskey; Enterprise Manufacturing Co., manu
Anheuser-Busch, Inc., brewers of Bud
weiser beer, and Gillette Safety Razor Co. Members of organized
labor and their friends are requested to refrain from patronizing
these firms and the two nonunion magazines in which they advertise.
tfariottjtarfs&i
GIFT STORE FOR MEN
Especially for Him
GIFT
TIES
Hand - tailored,
resilient construc
tion ties of im
ported or domest
ic fabrics. Silk
and wool mix
tures. Solid colors,
stripes, plaids,
figures. All are
nationally adver
tised.
$1 to $5
iitmionltetfisffifc
Charlotte s Fastest Growing Men’s Store
118 SOUTH TRYON
NEW LOCAL UNION FOR
SHENANDOAH EMPLOYES
WAYNESBORO, Va„ Dec. 10
. : " snenan
W0 pSSTeh^lbTi^ an aPProx'mate
the United Te& V«SS?S*fc£
»l<
jica, have organized a Local Union
with more than five hundred of the
number signing as charter members
L. James Johnson, of the UTW of A
fzin£ theS'ltedithe 70rkers in organ
6 I00®1- and >s now eneatred
^em >n negotiating an agreement
with the company officials, wliich will
tW,d0wrekfter thC eJection’tote held
FULL oF GOOD CHEER
100% UNION MADE
Atlantic
Brewing Co.
Charlotte, N. C.
....
' ""i"i'ivrr^Mwwww
roseland
FLORAL CO.
-?g'*£?, *y
«ww xi. iryen—comer Tryea
«d Sixth Street*
Patronize Journal Advertisers
WuriltMT SpiMtte PiuMW
92M VmUt
PARKER-GARDNER CO.
311 W. Trade
Steinway, Knabe, Mathusher,
Haddorf and Musette Pianos
Exclusively at
Andrews Music
Co.
Pender Stores
Answer Tour Problems of
QUALITY
AND
ECONOMY
DR. GEORGE I. WlKE
OPTOMETRIST
HAVE YOUR EYES EXAMINED
S17-A N. THYON ST., OffOiin PUBLIC LIBRARY
OPTICS RHOMB R.BB40 RBSIDSNCS RHOMB S.R4BS
    

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