North Carolina Newspapers

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Official Orgaa Ceatral
Labor Uatoa; strafe* far
the A. F. of L.
Ihe Charlotte labor Journal
Make YOUK
Truthful, Honest, Impartial
Endorsed by the N. C. SUto Federa
tion of Labor
AND DIXIE FAKH NEWS
Tenth Tear Of
Pabfcatk*
Endeavoring to Serve the Masses
VOL. X—NO. 35
CHARLOTTE, N. C„ THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1941
62.00 Per Y«
DEMAND MADE BY GOVERNMENT
THAT PLANTS CLOSED BY STRIKES
BE REOPENED—ARIBTRATE LATER
[On Tuesday night the Associated Press (no date lines) states
that the Government had stepped into the labor dispute involving
strike-closed plants in Ohio and Michigan, demanding that they be
re-opened.]
In San Diego the C.I.O. United
Automobile Workers empowered their
labor contract negotiators, .deadlocked
on the wage issue with the Ryan Aero
nautical company, to call a strike “if
and when necessary.”
The authorization was announced
by Richard T. Frankensteen, chief
C.I.O. negotiator, who emphasized
that the vote merely gave the bar
gaining committee discretionary
power to take such action if deem
ed advisable, and did not necessarily
mean steps to effect work stoppage
would be taken.
Balloting on the strike authoriza
tion began Tuesday morning by union
members of the company’s night shift,
and was completed last night at a
meeting of the day crew. The union
claims 1,060 of the company’s approxi
mately 1,600 employes are U.A.W.
members.
Officia} observers at the negotia
tions, which were broken off Monday,
said the National Defense Advisory
commission undoubtedly would be ask
ed or would decide to intervene in the
dispute should a strike appear likely.
Elsewhere on the labor front ac
cusations of “labor profiteering” and
“hiding behind national defense” were
exchanged by a labor leader and an
airplane company; Williani Green,
president of the A.F.L., accused a
C.I.O. union of a “deliberate attempt
to sabotage the national defense pro
gram”; and it was learned that the
C.I.O. Steel Workers union would ask
three big steel companies for wage
increases. H
The government’s position in the
Ohio and Michigan strikes, involving
five units and about 3,600 employes of
the Eaton Manufacturing company,
was stated by James F. Dewey, a La
bor department conciliator. Dewey
said in Detroit that he would insist as
a “defense measure” that the plants
be reopened and that differences be
adjusted after the plants were run
ning.
Dewey added that this was the first
time such a “drastic step” had been
taken by the government under the
defense program.
In Washington, John Owens, C.1.0.
adviser attached to the defense com
mission, said that Dewey’s "recom
mendation” had the approval of the
commission and the U. S. conciliation
service, but that the government had
no power to enforce it.
The Eaton company supplies parts
to factories making automobiles and
airplane engines. Owens said that
should the strike continue automo
bile factories employing approximate
ly 30,000 workers might be sluit down.
Green’s acusation against the C.l.O.
centered on this case. The A.F.L.
leader issued a statement in Washing
ton saying that B. J. Thomas, presi
dent of the C.l.O. United Auto Work
ers union, was “responsible” for the
strike, which started at the Eaton
company’s Saginaw, Mich., plant and
spread to units in other cities. Green
said the A.F.L. United Auto Workers
union held a two-year closed shop
contract with Eaton at Saginaw.
I Over the A.F.L.’* objection, the
C.I.O.-UA.W. asked the Labor board
in Washington to bold an election at
the Saginaw plant to determine which
union the workers wished to repre
sent them in colelctive bargaining. J.
O. Eaton, company chairman, said
the dispute was “strictly between dif
ferent groups of employes.”
I BROTHER BRADSHAW IS
BACK HOME SAFE AND
SOUND WITH HIS “BADGE”
W. A. Bradshaw who went to
Savannah last week to get his 35
year membership gold badge, land
ed back in town Sunday night. He
tells us he eras feted, photographed,
lionized, and made much of in Sa
- vannah, and promises us a story of
\ his trip, and, if he throws his usual
humor, along with talent for ob
servation into it, the reading will
be interesting.
Iceland has been quietly taken over
by Canadian troops to prevent foreign
powers from taking it.
Allied Printing
Trades Group To
Meet Here Jan. 26
The Charlotte Allied Printing
Trades Council is expecting around
200 in attendance at the Conference
to be held here Sunday, January 26,
at the Mecklenburg Hotel. Woodruff
Randolph, secretary-treasurer of the
I. T. U., will be the principal speaker.
This is the mid-winter meeting of
members of the various crafts in the
printing industry of the Southeast—
particularly the two Carolinas. Ray
Nixon represents Typographical
Union, No. 338 on the Allied Printing
Trades Council.
TO THE EDITOR:
The President of the United States trill be inaugurated on
January 20th, 1941. It is fitting that upon this occasion Labor should
join with all other who sincerely believe in religion as a factor in our
national life, and who have at heart the welfare of our country, in ex
pressing its desire that our President may be guidded during the
erilous days that are ahead. To that end, this prayer is offered*
CHARLES STELZLE.
LABOR’S PRAYER FOR THE
PRESIDENT
By Dr. CHARLES STELZLE
Thou Great Sovereign of all nations, Thou King of Kings,
and Lord of hosts, in these perilous times of war and rumors
of war, when al lthe powers of hate have been loosed to lull
and to destroy, we pray that Thy Spirit may steady the minds
and quicken the hearts of those who call themselves by Thy
name, acknowledging Thee as Father,
We pray especially for the President of these United States,
upon whom has been laid heavy burdens and grave responsi
bilities, as he speaks for our country and for its people.
Renew his strength as daily his burdens increase. Give
him the wisdom and understanding that cometh only from
above. Protect him from those whose motives and methods are
prompted by the spirit of selfishness or personal ambition.
Show him Thy wilL Out of the conflict of counsel may
Thy voice come unto him saying: This is the way — walk ye
in it. And as Thy will is revealed, increase his faith, so that
he may go forth in the consciousness of having fulfilled the task
committed to him.
And we pray that he, with us, shall seek above all things
else to honor and glorify Thee, hastening the,coming of Thy
Kingdom upon earth, and the rule of the spirit of brotherhood
in the lives and the hearts of all peoples of the earth so that
all nations may dwell together in peace and unity.
The LABOR JOURNAL
SERVING THE A. F. OF L IN
PIEDMONT, NORTH CAROLINA
STRIVING FOR THE RIGHTS OF THE WORKERS —
AND A FAIR DEAL FOR THE EMPLOYERS
A.F.L. INDORSES DEFENSE SACRIFICE,
BUT DOES NOT WANT STRIKE RIGHT
BANNED; DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS
ASKED BY PRESIDENT APPROVED
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18.—The American Federation ol La
bor told Congress yesterday that its members were ready to
“make sacrifices” for national defense, bat would oppose any at
tempt to curtail labor's “right to strike."
“It would be suicidal for us. in our haste to build an invul
nerable military defense of our country, to abandon democracy
in the process," the Federation said in presenting its legislative
recommendations.
A request that Congress authorise
promptly” defense appropriations
asked by President Roosevelt topped
the list of recommendations.
The A. F. L. said it would not op
pose “reasonable reductions” in relief
appropriations since defense expan
sion was providing jobs "at such a
rapid pace that it appears likely the
number of unemployed will be reduced
sharply by the end of the year.*' At
the same time, it estimated that there
were now 8.000,000 unemployed and
said it would insist upon “adequate
provisions for those unable to find
jobs in industry."
It said it would oppose any move
to “impair” present Federal labor
laws, but proposed these amendments
to the labor relations act as “safe
guards” against “possible future mal
administration:”
1— Opportunity for skilled employes
and recognized classifications of
workers “to retain their separate
unity if they so desire."
2— Direct appeals by unions in
representation cases.
3— Amendments “preserving the in
tegrity of collective bargaining agree
ments lawfully entered into By non#
fide labor organizations.”
4— Amendments “to eliminate the
outrageous delays that jeopardize the
organizational gains mad* tag many
labor unions."
5—A five-member labor relations
board.
Among othar points in tha program
were:
“Adequate appropriations” for the
Dies committee ana the Federal Bu
reau of Investigation for “vigilant in
vestigation and prompt suppression of
the activities of direct agents of hos
tile foreign governments in oar coun
try. end fifth-column movement.”
Extension of United States housing
act to provide homes for workers in
defense industries and “assure adapt
ability of such housing to the post
emergency needs of low-income fam
Extension of the Farm Security ad
ministration’s migratory labor camp
program and of the low-east rural
housing program.
Increased Federal grants to poorer
states for old age assistance, and ex
tension of sodal security coverage to
“millions of agricultural, domestic
and other workers not now included."
Insurance under sodal security laws
for permanent and temporary dis
ability.
Opposition to “wage cuts and false
economies” among lower paid govern
ment employes.
CENTRAL LABOR UNION ON RECORD
AS AGAINST THE ABOLISHMENT OF
PARKS - RECREATION AND CIVIL
SERVICE COMMISSIONS-MINUTES
While the attendance was not up to the average at Central
Labor Union meeting last night, what was lacking in members was
made up for by the interest shown df those present: *• *
MINUTES:—Meeting called to or
der by President Scoggins. Invoca
tion by Brother C. C. Thomas, of the
Firemen’s local. Pledge of allegiance
and salute to the Flag. Roll call of
officers. Minutes of last meeting
read and approved.
Brothers Key and Bell were obli
gated from the Film Exchange local.
New credentials were read and ap
proved from Local 71, Teamsters and
Chauffeurs, the delegates being A. L.
Gunter, Jack Thornburg and J. W.
Eudy. Jack Moore, of the Machinists
made a report and asked Central body
to sponsor a dance to make up a
skating area deficit, and the motion
being duly put was carried. Delegate
Pope, of the Carpenters and Joiners
reported for his local, stating that
they hoped to have the airport job
straightened out at an early date.
Local 71, Teamsters an!} Chauf
feurs, reported most old contracts re
newed and new members being ye?
ceived.
Brother Funderburk, of the Brew
ery Workers, made a report that his
local would at early date sign con
tract with the Jacob Rupert people.
Machinists local reported work good;
shortage of help and installation of
officers. Postoffice Clerks reported
more heln being put on.
A motion was carried to appoint a
committee to look into, and inspect
conditions at the doc pound.
It was moved and seconded that
Charlotte Central Labor Union ,
reaffirm its faith in the aril
Service and Parks and Recrea
tion Commission, and aak for an
improvement on what we now
have, instead of relegating the
power of these anits to the city
council. The strength of Labor
in^Charlotte was pledged to this
A short talk was made by an inter
national representative of the Brew
ery Workers, who is in this territory
straightening out the Ruppert beer
and Quality Bottling Company tangle.
Mrs. Bertha Helms, textile worker
and an R. F. of L. adherent was pres
ent and made a brief talk on oroani
sation along textile lines, stating that
work was going forward steadily for
a United Textile Workers local here.
The meeting adjourned at 9:80. Sec
retary Greene was absent on account
of the flu having got hold of him, and
Brother Conder of the Carpenters'
local, pinch hit for him, as usual.
LASTING VALUE
The successful resistance of the American Federation
of Labor .to the introduction of Communist purposes and
methods in the labor movement was an outstanding patri
otic accomplishment Its lasting value will be recognized
more and more as time passes. John P. Frey.
Fly the FLAG
THE A. F. OF L. STANDS WITH AND FOR THE FLAG
i
SPEED UP THE DEFENSE PROGRAM
SAYS LABOR MAN — TAKES ISSUE
WITH DR. GEORGE GALLOP POLL
BY H. P. PERRY
(Former member of Charlotte Machinists Local No. 263, and
well and favorably known throughout North Carolina. The article
was sent The Journal from Rock Island, 111.)
SPEED UP THE DEFENSE PROGRAM *
I have just read with great interest an article, one of a series
analyzing public opinion on the defense program by Dr. George
Gallup, Director of American Institute of Public Opinion. In
closed in this article is shown the result of which was supposed
to be a vote coming from the rank and file of American workers.
Quote: “If it would help speed up
the defense program, would you be
willing to work more hours per week
at the same rate of pay per hour aa
you are now getting? Unquote.
The result of the poll taken was
as follows: Yes, 71%; No, 22%; Un
decided, 7%.
Quote: Question corering this point
was put to a cross section of em
ployed persons at the present time.
Unquote.
In answer to Dr. Gallup will take
the liberty to state, the American
workman will not be influenced by
such misleading statements or propa
ganda of this nature would suggest
that you get your next poll from em
ployees of any Government yard, air
plane production plant, shipyard,, mu
nition plant or railroad, which are
all most essential in the present de
fense program.
The American workmen will be
among the leaders when it comes to
making sacrafices in any emergency
or defense program for the protection
of our Country, Homes or Liberty.
The writer being an American
Workman for more than a third of a
century and at the present time doing
my part in the defense program, be
lieves the following statement will ex
press the true sentiment of the rank
and file. We canont see that even an
emergency like this should cause us
to relinquish something we have
fought tor more than half a century
to obtain, that being penalty on the
working of overtime. Should this rule
be abrogated it would mean more
profit to the manufacturer, another
way to chisel.
I notice in the same paper in which
this article appeared, one of our lead
ing airplane manufacturing corpora
tions (not withstanding the fact they
were paying time and one-half for all
overtime worked during 1940) de
clared a dividend for 1940 of 27% on
common stock, another corporation
declared a 45% dividend and many
others too numerous to mention.
If our overtime rule was relinquish
ed it would mean a setback of many
years and a repetition of many hard
ships in having same re-established
with some of our most generous and
patriotic corporation officials. This
penalty on overtime is to discourage
the working of long hours and there
by create more jobs.
Dr. Gallup further states: quotes—
Thif vote of course represents only
the opinion of the rank and file of de
fense workers and not of the Labor
Union leaders. Unauote. Naturally
this vote was taken m some exclusive
cross-section where said defense work
ers didn’t know what it was all about,
or we may surmise these defense
workers were pupils from the school
educated by some of those highpower
ed and most efficient instructors that
can take any apple knocker and make
a mechanic out of him in six weeks,
we do not know how it is done, all
we know we see it in the papers.
Our Labor Union leaders and execu
tives express and carry out the wiahss
of the membership of their respective
organizations, that being one of their
most important duties and very es
sential in continuing as a representa
tive. They keep veil informed upon
all questions arising effecting condi
tions by receiving daily and weekly
reports governing wages, hours ana
general working conditions, and ready
at all times to defend the rights of
their members. In conclusion let me
get this over to our Director of the
American Institute of Public Opinion:
Our American Workmen build and
operate railroads, battleships, fight
ing planes of all kinds, guns, muni
tion, go into the front line trenchee
and everything necessary for the de
fense and protection of the best coun
try in all the world—the Good Old
A- ->
Now to get real action in speeding
up our defense program the most e£
fective solution is, cooperate with
your employees, cut out all forms of
chiseling against our Government and
American workmen. That will mean
much more than a little and
one-half. ^
A good quotation to remember: "A
satisfied organization of employees
is your most beneficial and ‘
asset”
Charlotte Location
Wage and Hour
Field Office
The Journal has so many
calls as to the location of the
Charlotte Wage and Hour
Field Office, that it is publish
ing the address for the bene
fit of those who have need of
its services:
WAGE AND HOUR FIELD
OFFICE
409 Johnston Bldg.
212 S. Tryon St.
Phone 3-8631
PLENTY OF KICKS
New Employer: "Are you
with molest”
Negro Stableman: "No, sir. Ah
knows ’em too well to set familiar.”
EXCUSE IT, PLEASE
Diner: “Waiter, there's a button in
my soup,”
Waiter (ex-nrinter): "Typographi
cal error, sir; it should be mutton ”
IF TOUR SUBSCRIPTION
IS IN ARREARS
Strike In Five
Auto Plants Has
Been Settled
DETROIT, Jan. 16— Federal
Conciliator Janies F. Dewey an*
nounced last night settlemeat of
the strike affecting SJN workers
in five plants of the Eaton Mann*
factoring company.
Terms ending the two-day strike,
to which Dewey had demanded an
end in view of national defense
orders to the Eaton company, were
not immediately announced. Dewey
said the atrikera would return to
work tomorrow.
SMALL CROWD
I understand,” said a young wo*
man to another, "that at your chuck
you are having such small congrega
tions. Is that soT”
“Yes,” answered the other girL “so
small that every time the rector says
‘Dearly Belover* you fel as If yon had
received a proposal."
The latest figures show that tie
pensioners live an average of S§
years, dying before seventy became
of a lack of mental or physical a»
tivity.
PATRONIZE
JOURNAL
ADVERTISERS
THE JOURNAL kaa b? far
the largest city circulation *f
any weekly published in Char
lotte. Tour ad in The Journal
will bring results from tbs
UNION LABELS
Let'a rake 1941 a Union year. Lot’s call for LABELS
on Shirts, Clothing:, Shoes, Hats,’ Ties — (and everything
else) when a Union Label is not obtainable, buy front a mer
chant fair to organised labor. Boy America first, last and
always. Lay off of "Made in Germany,** "Made hi Japan,**
— BUT MADE IN AMERICA.
    

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