North Carolina Newspapers

    Hie Charlotte Labor Journal
AMD DIXIE FARM NEWS
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PIONB MIN
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WAGE EARNERS: Men and Women spend your wages in the
city where yon live,
always remember
ing that “The Dol
lar That Goes the
Farthest is the Dol
lar That Stays at
Home.”
The Labor Journal will not be responsible for opinions
of correspondents. If you do not get your paper drop a postal
to the Editor and he will see that you do.
We believe in American business and American Workers.
We believe that a just share of the profits which the workers
help produce, should be given the worker, for without this;
benefit, lasting prosperity cannot be assured.
The Labor Journal is true to the American ideals of
. Government and believe that the people of America under
their own Democracy are capable of solving their own prob
lems in their own way, without aid of philosophies that run
counter to our demonstrated form of government. We be
lieve in the Constitution of the United States and in the
Stars and Stripes, its official emblem.
We are opposed of Nazism, Communism, Fascism, »nH
all other “Isms” that seek to destroy and undermine our
Democratic form of government.
Were it not for the labor press the labor move
ment would not be what it is today, and any man who
tries to injure a labor paper is a traitor to the cause.
—Pres. Gompers.
................. ---iTnvuwmji
CHARLOTTE, N. C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1941
$117,500,000,000 WORTH OF SECURITY
Life insurance in force in this country recently touched its
all-time peake of $117,500,000,000. And during the first half
of 1940, the lapse rate was the lowest ever recorded for a similar
period.
That gives you an idea of what the American people think of
the life insurance industry. They regard a life insurance policy
as something to be kept at all costs. They won’t impair its value
by borrowing, or abandon it for its cash value until dire necessity
makes that absolutely unavoidable. And on top of that, they
steadily increase their ownership of life insurance as rapidly as
financial circumstances permit.
This is indicative of two things. First, it shows our desire
for earned social security. Second, it shows faith in an institu
tion of outstanding solvency and safety.
PATRON]
JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
FOR SERVICE
Courteous and Prompt
REMEMBER THE
SELWYN CUT RATE DRUG STORE
DISTINCTIVE FOUNTAIN SERVICE
125 W. TRADE ST.
Prescriptions Filled By Registered Pharmacists
MID-WINTER
BEAN SALE
Sultana Rad Kidney
BEANS 3 a 17c
Pea or Pinto Dried
BEANS
Each
Per
Lb.
SYRUP
FLOUR
Iona Lima
BEANS
17*
Cans
Ann Page
Blended
Sunnyfield
High
Quality
2
24
12-Oz.
Bots.
Lb.
Bag
25c
79c
IVORY SNOW
9c 25c— LAVA SOAP 6c
CAMAY SOAP * i»*»25c— IVORY FLAKES tff* 9 23c
pk«. pk|
0XV00L 3 ££ 25* 21c—SELOX 2 £» 25c
CRISCO 3 lb. cn 50c
8 O'CLOCK
A«P BREAD
Mild & Mellow
Coffee
18-0*.
Pullman
3
2
Lb.
Bag
Loaves
37c
15c
«WW(
LETS REORGANIZE OUR WOMEN’S UNION
LABEL LEAGUE
A few yean ago Charoltte Central Labor Union boasted an
auxiliary that meant much to the A. P. of L. forces In this terri
tory, in more ways than just the promotion of Union Made Goods.
This body of women formed and bound together to meet exist
ing needs of their husbands, sons, daughters, relatives, and all
sympathizers of the organized labor movement meant much, but
through “hokus-pokus” or “something” it disintegrated, and while
the charter granted in 1934 is still extant, there are no meetings.
This organization did much good*wdrk in its day, and was a power
—it furnished entertainment; it gave a social tinge to the hard
boiled facts being worked out by the men in their contact and
daily routine of struggle; it filled with “choice viands” the stomach
of the hale and hearty workers, and the “delicate” appetite of
many others.
Along with J. A. Moore, of the Machinists, a tireless worker
in the ranks of Labor, this writer helped to start this League
upon its journey, and like the Proverbial Bay Tree, it flourished,
but from some cause, whether internal or external, interest lagged.
The ritual gives a beautiful ceremony, with the Flag always pre
dominating, the Bible in evidence and a spirit of love and good
will exuding through it all.
Interest is again being taken in seeing this arm of the A. F.
of L. in Charlotte placed in an active state, and this writer was
appointed by President Scoggins, of Central Labor Union, to do
the job, with the co-operation of each and every delegate, and
each and every member of the affiliated locals in Charlotte.
This is the first gun in the campaign, and “we” promise to
(along with other New Year’s Resolutions) see that before the
State Federation of Labor Convention convenes here in August,
Charlotte will have an active Women’s Union Label League, which
can be used to advantage in our convention activities.
WHY LENGTHEN WORK WEEK?
Recent figures released by the United States Department of
Labor indicate that as the length of the average work-week declines,
production increases.
In 1909, the average factory worker put in 53 hours and pro
duced 100 units of production per week. By 1929 the work week
had shortened to 46 hours and production increased to 173 units. In
1939, the work week averaged 38 hours and weekly production
reached the astonishing figure of 188 unts. This change has been
made possible by the introduction of labor-saving machinery and
high-speed work under the short work-week.
Modern machinery requires greater alertness an dspeed of action.
Top efficiency cannot be maintained for long periods.—Townsend
Weekly.
YOU AND YOUR TAXES — YES, YOU PAY THEM —
ONE WAY OR ANOTHER!
An editorial in the Charlotte Observer of recent date as to
taxes, makes very interesting reading, and gives you a good insight
into hidden taxes. The Texas Manufacturers’ Association in a
survey of the small Middle Western town which is typical of most
any other town in this old U. S. A. We quote<
EVERYBODY IN ON THIS
Ever and anon you hear somebody say they don’t care anything
about how high taxes are because they don't pay them. .
Let the National debt go to any height, the rich will have it
to pay off!
Let the city and county and state authorities spend whatever
they may please in giving the people more and more of public serv
ices, it will be the landlords and the merchants and the power and
tobacco companies who must stand the gaff of providing for the
revenue.
It is always going to be hard to bring about any material
reformation in this tenddtacy of the politicians to keep on multiply
ing taxes so long as such a large part of the public is tax-uncon
scious, so long asi so many people take the position that, no matter
* how nrftch of pubUc revenues' are spent, none of their income or
earnings are included in the bill
Of coarse, it is ■ totally untenable stand to amne.
Everybody does gay taxes, whether everybody knows it or not.
The poorest and humblest among the citizens have their propor
tioB*** pnrt of this public load to carry.
They may never get to the office of the tax collectors to fork
ap a few dollars in the form of annual taxes, bat, nevertheless.
_-_ oaa mv aviam w» I IMVI, VHt, IIVVVIUIVIVW,
they famish some of the money that other men are taking down to •
the revenue collectors and paying over to the city, the county, the
state or the Federal government.
... ^ those who m deluded into thinking that they are escaping
this, responsibility want to get a dear insight into what they are
*Pyhif 1® the form of hidden taxes, let them glance down the
following, taken from a bulletin of the Texas Manufacturers Asso
rt!;* after a survey had be*n made in this field in a typical smaU
Middle Western town:
X***1 take 15 cents of every dollar spent for new automobiles.
Tuxes take IS cents of every dollar spent for furniture.
Taxes take 25 cents of every dollar spent for rent.
Taxes take 10 cents of every dollars spent for wall paper.
Taxes take 12 cents of every dollar sent for movie tickets.
Taxes take three cents of every dollar spent for insurance.
Taxes take 10 cents* of every dollar spent for women’s clothing.
Taxes take 12 cents of every dollar spent for men’s clothing.
Taxes take seven cents of every dollar spent for shoes.
Taxes take 12 cents of every dollar spent for electricity, 15 cents
of every dollar spent for gas.
Taxes take six cents of every dollar spent for bus fare.
Taxes take eight cents of every dollar spent for meat, 18 cents
of every dollar spent for sugar, IS cents of every dollar spent for
matches, five cents of every dollar spent for soap, 34 cents of every
spent for beer, nine cents of every dollar spent for vegetables,
* °( *Twf dollar spent for canned goods.
Taxes take 20 cents of every dollar spent for proprietary medi
an*, beauty preparations, or shaving cream.
Taxes take 15 cents of every dollar spent for bread.
Taxes take 11 cents of every dollar spent for railroad fare.
Taxes take 15 cents of every dollar paid on telephone bills.
Taxes take 10 cents of every dollar spent for milk and dairy
products.
Taxes take 37 cents of every dollar spent for automobile upkeep,
in Bari5ittaJ^]Fr°" tJl* Cr*dl* th* Gr,Te”—Wh»t does it cost
SANITARY LAUNDRY, INC.
Phone 2-217*
ZORIC CLEANING
1315 South Boulevard
CHARLOTTE, N. C.
SOME OF THE THINGS
WE LEND MONEY ON
Iff
8Ut«_
Shot One
^ Kiflaa
Plata la
Traaka
DfiaaUt
Watefcaa
Jewelry
Maa’a Ctetklac
Taala Traaka Rod aka
8»ertlaf Cm* A<Mla| Maekiaaa Tyyawrftara
AH Btuiaeaa Strictly Confidential, When in Need of
Money We Never Fall Ton
1S1 ■. TRAD! ST. (Next to SelVa)
Baa Ua Par Baryalaa la Dkaaad Watckaa, Jewelry, Ctotklar ate.
RELIABLE LOAN CO.
Maaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaoa
PATRONIZE JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
THE JOURNAL ku by far
the largest city circulation of
any weekly published in Char*
lotto. Your ad in The Journal
will bring results front the
workers.
***********
*************0
1941 TAX LISTING
Law requires that all property not
exempted by law be listed as of Jan
uary 1, 1941, during January only, by
the title holder; new buildings and
additions costing more than |100, per
sonal property and polls for all male
persons to 21 to 50 years. Real estate
is already listed. Penalty of ten per
cent each ($1.00 minimum) for City
and County for late listing. List early
and avoid penalties for late listing.
J. ARTHUR HENDERSON
Tax Supervisor
Jan. 16, 23, 30—41.
*9*
tkhSifH
StkhButri*
REX
RECREATION
AJ(S BOWUNS UIMt
When Ualsu
Tear
1JMST I TITO* If.
NOTICE OF SERVICE BY PUBLICATION
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA
COUNTY OF MECKLENBURG
Eetalle Houae O’Neal. Plaintiff
Ve.
Auruatua A. O'Neal, Defendant
The Defendant. Auguetua A. O’Neal, above
named, will take notice that an action, ae
above entitled, hae been eonuneneed In the
Superior Court of Mecklenburg County for an
abeolute divorce. And the Defendant will
further take notice that he ie required to ap
thT,10thf“r* **,_®*«* o! ®“P«*>r Court oh
day of March. 1M1. in the aforaeaM
County and State, and anawer or demur to the
complaint in aaM action, or the plaintiff will
fppbr,.to„ th*,(roort ,or "■* demanded
in mid Complaint.
This the ldth day of January. 1*41.
J. LESTER WOLFE
_ Clerk of the i
M. J. BLANKENSHIP
Court
Every Family
large or small
SAVES
TIME-WORRY
AND MONEY
By Using
CHARLOTTE LAUNDRY’S
SUPERIOR SERVICES
WE HAVE A SERVICE TO FIT EVERY FAMILY'S
NEED AND EVERY FAMILY'S BUDGET!
LAUNDRY - DRY CLEANING
UVe Feature the Foilotrinal
• Bundle Work
• Family Finish
• Family Flat
• Fluff Dry (fist finished)
• Thrifty (flat finished)
• Damp Wash
• Blankets
• Comforts
• Ruga
• Curtains
• Crocheted Mats
• Pillows
• Hats
. • Fine Linens Hand Laundered
• Suits
• Dresses
• Coats
• Overcoats
• Furs
• Sommer and Winter Storage—For Storage—Window Shade and Venetian Blind
Cleaning—Garment Mending—Diaper Service
20% Discount
OH CASH AND CARRY
LAUNDRY SERVICE
CHARLOTTE LAUNDRY, Inc.
116 East Second St. Dial g-5191
TRY OUR CONVENIENT CURB SERVICE
    

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