North Carolina Newspapers

    Hw ONLY REALLY INDEPENDENT WEEKLY l» Mockknburi Coaaty wxto wjquMxmit AW^inatmaPBo For «_W—Uy Its Readers Repreaont th« LARGEST BUYING POWgR_fa_^;»lotU
Official Orrao of Coatral
Labor Uatea; «UM<h| for
dM A. P. of L
Truthftd, Honest, ImforHol
Hit
labor Journal
Patroalao oar Adrortfcon.
They Make TOUR Pa
poosiblo by tboir
Endorsed by the N. C. State
Federation of Labor
AND DIXIE FARM NEWS
T*atfc YpSw2t£jld,,"®,“ Endeavoring to Serve the Mosses
VOL. X—NO. 40
TOWS AtviatiiMlNf sm Tut iMMH
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CHARLOTTE, N. C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20,1941
92.00 Por Y«
LABOR’S MONTHLY SURVEY BY A.F.L.
PLAYS UP COLLECTIVE BARGAINING
AS THE ROAD TO INDUSTRIAL PEACE
The recent furore over strikes in defense industries has Jfiven
the American public an utterly false impression. Newspapers
have pblyedup strike stories, often making it appear that tabor
was at fault. Tney have failed to show why these strikes occurred,
thev have ignored the thousands of disputes settled peacefully
they b»»e »id nothin W tW whohj
hearted cooperation being given by hundreds of thousands of
union members in defense production. _
It is time to look atthe fucts
Actually, time lost during strikes in
American industry last yw was ex
tremely small. It amounted to teas
than two hours per worker employe,
for the entire year; it was scarce'*
more than one-third the time lost in
1939. Compared with .Pre™’“f
riods, it was less th*n ^
last twelve years except 1929
1930 When we consider the intense
resistance many ‘^ col-1
making to union organisation »na c
lective*bargaining, this record is in
deed an achievement. wpR
WHY ARE THERE FEWbK
STRIKES?
The major cause of strikes in recent
yeSfhM Wnthe effort to:gam un^n
recognition and negotiate a «lrig
agreement; it accounts 1933 to
lost during strikes from ,
imI Nearly all serious strikes in de
}£i wS2ta l»v* l««n *» t. IW.
ass svsarssx^
^SienUinte. United States. Thu
frlpAMi than twice and possibly thiee
limps the number under union agree
lS!ht wars ago. In fact, union
SSSSMSiunss
*£Sijas5Jss
ire c»iicvw»v —
as the metnoa iw --
labor-management Pr®“*n^likes
This is one reason why strikes
inis w _i. the oatri
are
« j. hein^made by American Fed
!!?Uhorunioris to settle their
SnmM '^SwnUAL
PROOKEaa TOWARD mDU^TBUL
Thp vear 1940 marks a milepost in
the long struggle to make democracy
Ideality in American industrial life
as it is in our political life. f 1£
usk was to give workers represents
Sf through unions; the second tone
“«*”«• ““k“‘hS
work standards and providing
sssasfi«ssA*
ready KTccomJLhed over a large
PttThe°fN^o^TLibor*Station. Act
m.Tdeethi.a great achievement possihte
with a minimum of >nd“tr*»' 8t“Ik
This fact stands out if look tac
to the last world war. In the troubiea
V»... of 1916-1921. 52^
3,603 per year; from 1933-1940 tney
averaged only 2,626 per year. Yet
progress toward industnal democracy
in 1933-1940 was double that of tne
earlier period. _ _
THE UNION AGRKKWEWi a
8TITUTION FOR INDUSTRY
The union agreement is a consti
tution for democratic government In
the workshop. Also, it provides a »*t
of laws or rules under which workers
and management agree to do business
with each other. Practically even?
agreement provides for joint commit
tees and joint meetings where work
ers and management can take up
grievances and discuss their prob
lems; most agreements provide arbi
tration for problems which canont be
settled in conference. The vast ma
jority of controversies are quickly set
tled when workers and management
meet in good faith around the confer
ence table. , ,
Collective bargaining procedure is
the very essence of democracy. It de
pends on good faith, fair dealings, in
tegrity of purpose, willingness to lay
the facts on the table.
Tr»e wOiKinjr u* umwiw
racy has already proved ita value in
industries where collective bargain*
ing • has been accepted practice. tor
manv years. Where management and
wo/ kers habitually meet in Joint con
ference in a spirit of good faith, the
extension of collective bargaining to
include mediation of arbitration, and
to active cooperation for better pro
duction is a natural outgrowth It ia
part of the democratic process.
RIGHT LEGISLATION CAN HELP
The Railway Labor Act of 1926,
with amendments in 1934, is the cul
mination of 50 years’ experience with
Federal legislation to govern labor
relations. Because it has been out
standingly successful in promoting
sound labor relations, its principles
are worth considering as a guide for
new legislation.
First, it makes the union agreement
the instrument to govern labor rela
tions; the union agrement is the ob
jective, to be reached by collective
bargaining between representatives of
unions and management. Secondly,
the Act provides convenient mediating
and adjusting agencies to deal with
different types of disputes. Third,
where mediation fails, voluntary arbi
tration is provided for, with final re
course to an emergency fact-finding
board. Acceptance of all findings is
voluntary; there is no compulsion.
BUSINESS OUTLOOK FOR 1941
Industrial production in 1941 is ex
pected to reach a new all time peak.
Already first quarter production is
averaging above the last 1940 quarter,
in spite of a alight temporary down
ward trend: First quarter 1941 pro
duction forecast at average 136, last
quarter 1940 averaged 132; 1929 peak
quarter was 114; all time peak was
137 in December, 1940.
National income for 1941 is fore
cast at $83 billion, compared with
$74 billion in 1940 and $70 billion in
1939. National buying power in 1941
will exceed all previous levfli^-Even
in 1940, rising payrolls lifted retail
trade 8% above 1939 (full year).
COST OF LIVING
Forecasts by experts indicate that
before June, 1941, living costa are
likely to be 2 to 8% above last year.
Standard Statistics expects an in
crease of not over 6% by the year
end; another source estimates 6 to 8%
increase by December, 1941.
WAGES
American labor ia still far from its
goal of adequate food, clothing, homes
for all. Thousands of workers are
still living below the minimum neces
sary to support a family in decency;
our country’s first defense need is
strong healthy citisens. A minimum
subsistence budget for a family of
four today costs $1,354; a minimum
health and efficiency budget for a
family of five costa $2,056.
Wages are moving upward. The
table shows gains recently made by
unions affiliated with the American
Federation of Labor. Labor Depart
ment reports covering a portion of
manufacturing industry show a wave
of wage increases toward the end of
last year: Last half of 1940, 1,183
wage increases averaging 6%; first
half, 574 increases; last half of 1939,
678 increases.
UNEMPLOYMENT
The hard core of unemployment
will still be with us a year from now,
according to the best available esti
mates. Earlier forecasts on unem
ployment have been revised, and it is
now believed that 6,000,00 workers
will still be out of work in December,
1941. From June to December, 1940,
unemployment was reduced by 1,600,
000 but there were still 7,900,000 out
of work in the United States at the
end of last year.
wwawwvvwwvwaawwwaaaaaw
ANOTHER AIRPORT FOR CHARLOTTE
IS A NECESSITY-GOVERNMENT
WILL GIVE $300,000.00 —CITY TO
VOTE $60,000.00 BOND ISSUE
On Monday night at the Chamber of Commerce a meeting of
prominent citisena waa held to devise ways and means of raising
funds for a Secondary Civilian airport, and a bond issue was de
City Attorney Scarborough stated
that a special act by the General
Assembly would permit the holding of
a special election to vote on the is
suance of bonds and calculated that
preliminaries ought to be gotten out
of the way and the election held
“within 40 days.”
A special meeting of the City
Council was held at 11 A. M. Tues
day to instruct the City Attorney to
prepare a bill authorising an elec
tion for the issuance of about 660,
000 of bonds for a secondary civilian
* ?hU course was taken today as the
result of enthusiastic ' *
given last night.
The second airport is
cause the Douglas Airport has boon
leased to the Army for its Air Base
and soon ho planes, except those with
two-way radio, will be permitted to
land there. There must be another
field where private flying will be un
restricted, it was said.
It was stated that the city was
without authority to spend money for
airports without the approval of the
electorate, and can not purchase the
land, as required to obtain the $300,
000.
A tract of SO Oacres off the Dixie
Road is under option for purchase as
the site for the second airport but it
was agreed last night that a repre
sentative of the Civil Aeronautics
Authority would be asked to come
here and select the site.
While about $15,000 is neceesaqr to
procure the land, other items looking
to the successful operation of the sec
ondary airport will call for a $60,000
outlay.
AIRPORT JOB A BUILDING TRADES AGREEMENT
J. C. Turner, of the Operating Engineers’ Union, A. F.
of L, and a member of the committee having the matter of
the Airport question in hand gave The Journal the following
statement on Tuesday morning, after a satisfactory agree*
ment had been reached on Monday:
“Probably the most important asset of the agreement
from the viewpoint of the Charlotte Labor movement is the
fact that it is a building trades agreement taking in all crafts
affiliated with the building trades. This factor will unify
those crafts engaged in construction work insofar that they
must all remain in good standing with the Building Trades
Council if they are to reap the benefits of this agreement.
This means that several crafts must return to the fold. It
is only through unity that the labor movement can progress
in the different fields. With this new unity we can Reded
icate Ourselves to the Battle for Labor in the Building Field.
Though this seems a great victory, it is my firm belief that
there will be greater victories in the future—so great as to
make this victory seem relatively insignificant."
CHARLOTTE CENTRAL LABOR UNION
GOES ON RECORD OPPOSING ANTI
SABOTAGE BILL IN LEGISLATURE
MINUTES. CHARLOTTE CENTRAL
LABOR UNION, WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 19TH.
Meeting called to order by President
Scoggins, invocation by Bro. W. S.
Campbell. Minutes of previous meet
ing read and approved.
Report of special and standing com
mittees. Brief of minutes of Fire
fighter meetings in regards to fire
man’s retirement bill presented to
Central Body.
Jack Moore reported on Firemen’s
retirement bill. He offered his
resignation from committee to help
fire fighters on retirement. Firefight
ers refused to accept his resignation.
Motion made and carried that Cen
tral Labor Union wire Mecklenburg
legislators asking them to support the
Firemens’ retirement bill.
Legislative Chairman reported send
ing telegrams to our legislators ask
ing them to oppose the anti-sabotage
bill, H.B. 204.
CENTRAL LABOR APPROVED
ALL DELEGATES WRITING LEG
ISLATION Tp OPPOSE H.B. 204.
Report of locals: Carpenters reports
contract signed with contractors for
Air Base to employ union men. Vote
of thanks given to the men responsible
for the contract at Airport. Letter
to be sent to R. K. Amyx, Printing
Pressmen Assistants in regard to
whereabouts of charter for local chap
ter of Printing Pressmen and Assist
ants.
1 After discussion on coming state
convention of N. C. Federation of La
bor and discussion for welfare of the
union, March 5th was set aside as
convention week.
Representative Turner of City and
County Employees was present and
spoke briefly on what progress his
International has made since its in
ception in the American Federation
of Labor in 1936. He spoke of the
last convention that divided the ter
ritory into Districts of which he rep
fsents the state of North Carolina.
Mrs. Helms of the Textile Workers,
Sas present and reported that they
ive ordered a charter for the work
ers of the Calvine mill and that Rep
resentative Jones stated that the lo
cal at Paw Creek would affiliate at
the proper time.
Councilman Claude Albea was pres
ent and made some remarks on the
convention and offered his services,
financially and otherwise, for the
convention.
NEXT MONDAY
The Women’s Typographical Union
Auxiliary meets Monday at 7:30 p.m.
With Mrs. C. B. Capps, 2058 Green
Way. This is the regular monthly
ig, and much business is to be
There are 9,000 cases in New York
City every year, where parents ask
for the arrest of their own children.
Twenty pieces of ivory, from the
ivory palace of King Ahab and his
queen, the wicked Jexebel, have been
acquired by Harvard College. King
Ahab died in battle 897 B. C.
It is claimed that new British un
derground refineries will turn out
30,000 barrels of petroleum products
daily.
TYPO AUXILIARY MEETS
...
First Lady Backs Leviion Strikers
Six months 1(0 1.7M workers of the I«riton Mfg. h fcjok*
lyn, walked oat on strike, led by Local S, Interactional Brotherhood
at Electrical Workers. Non-union for 15 years, the company said the
strike wouldn’t last three weeks. Union’s demands are: $1« per week
minimum, four dollars increase for all, now .receireing minimum and
a union shop. Union has spent nearly in strike benefits.
Last week Mrs. Franklin Delano Roosevelt urged the workers to stand
firm in their fight for “a decent way of life.” Of their strike and their
demands. she said: Tm afraid I agree wtih you.” Here she is being
greeted by union officials. Extreme left: Hairy Van Arsdale, Jr,
youthful and hard-hitting businees manager of Local 5; canter, Mrs.
test*
PATRONIZE JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
DEFEAT ANTI-SABOTAGE BILL;
WIRE YOUR REPRESENTATIVES
Mr. W. M. Witter, Editor,
Charlotte Labor Journal,
Charlotte, N. C.
Dear Sir and Brother:
RALEIGH, Feb. 19, 1941
Hearing on the Anti-Sabotage Bill was postponed yes*
terday to next Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock. I am here*
with sending you an analysis of this hateful bill showing
clearly what it would do to us if enacted.
Please keep up the good work of sending letters and tele
grams to your legislative members between now and next
Tuesday opposing this bill.
Fraternally yours,
C. A. FINK, President.
Hie above letter was received too late for The Journal
to publish the analysis, but every worker should know that
it is a bin intended as a direct blow at Labor, and it is his
duty to use every effort for its defeat and keep well in mind
those who would vote this bill into law.
BUILDING TRADES AGREEMENT
ON THE DOUGLAS AIR BASE JOB
GIVES UNION* FULL RECOGNITION
A peaceful settlement was reached Monday, when contractors
and labor representatives signed an agreement for negotiations for
an increased wage scale for the skilled workers on the Air Base
construction project.
If approved by the War Depart
ment, which it no doubt will be, it
will mean an increase of several thou
sand dollars weekly to workers on
this project. It is estimated that 1,500
skilled workmen will be affected by
this agreement. Common laborers are
not included.
The contract is signed by F. G.
Blythe, of Blythe Brothers Construc
tion Co., and Roy Goode, of the Goode
Construction company, and J. C. Tur
ner and other union representatives.
The agreement was approved Mon
day night at a joint meeting of the
interested bodies at the Carpenters’
Hall. Mr. Turner gave out the state
ment that “he hoped it would illus
trate to the people of Charlotte that
collective - bargaining can be carried
on in complete harmony with both
sides. He praised the spirit and co
operation of the contractors.” -
In signing the agreement, the con
tractors inserted a clause providing
that all working rules, wage scales
and other conditions are subject to
approval of the government.
Main points in the agreement pro
vide: that the company cooperate
with the union in attempting to have
increases granted in the wage scales,
that the companies shall call the re
spective crafts for men when needed,
with.exception of common laborers,
and to further cooperate in other re
spects.
It also stipulates that if the crafts
are unable to furnish needed men
within 24 hours, the company may go
into the open market and hire me
chanics, union or non-union to man
the project.
Wages were increased by the peti
tion agreement as follows: Carpen
ters from 87 1-2 cents an boor to $1;
painters from 87 1-2 to fl; teamsters
from 49 cents to 66. 76 and 90 eeots;
shovel' drivers from f 14V:
and tractor drivers from $1 to |14>
an hour.
Mr. Turner and S. M. Kiser, bend
of the local teamsters union, will go
to Washington Wednesday to present
the agreement before the War depart
ment’s bureau of labor for approval.
ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL
WILL CALL UPON CONGRESS FOR
A DIRECT RADIO TAXATION
I -
MIAMI, Fla., Feb. 17.—Organized
printers and allied workers of the na
tion will ask Congress to place direct
taxation on radio revenues and re
strict the issuance of station licenses.
' John B. Haggarty, president of the
A.F.L.’s International Allied Printing
Trades council, said a five-year study
showed such legislation was necessary
to counteract the inroads of the radio
into revenues of newspapers and oth
-er industries in which his men are
employed.
The radio cost his unions 26,000
jobs, be added.
The council, he said, will ask, first,
that Congress permit the. Federal
Communications commission to issue
licenses for radio stations only to per
sons residing in the community where
the station will operate and, second,
that stations be permitted to devote
only 26 per cent of their time on the
air to commercial programs.
These proposals, together with de
mands for direct taxation of the radio
industry, will be backed by the print
ing trades which employ 200,000
workers, and Haggerty will aak 16,
000 publishers and printing execu
tives to join the campaign.
The council’s study revealed, he
said, that whereas the radio took two
cents of each dolalr spent for all ad
vertising in 1929, it had increased ite
share to 36 cents on the dollar last
year. From 1930 to 1939, the stations
were shown to have increased from
26 to 40 per cent the proportion of
commercial programs, and the chains
were producing 90 per cent conuaor
cials.
Haggarty said 619 radio stations
with an investment of $223*2,000
showed a profit of $18,206,000 In 1229
—approximately 63 per cent. He said
Columbia Broadcasting company, on
an investment of $1,600,000, declared
dividends of $3,000,000 in the past
five years. National Broadcasting
company, he said, had shown profits
of $22,319,000 since its founding on
an original investment of $$300300.
Fly the FLAG
THE A. F. OF L. STANDS WITH AND FOB THE FLAB
-——-———
    

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