North Carolina Newspapers

    1W ONLY REALLY INDEPENDENT WEEKLY hi
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Che Charlotte labor Journal
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Truthful, Honest, Impartial
by the N. C. State
AND DIXIE FARM NEWS
Tenth Year Of
Publication
Endeavoring to Serve the Mams
VOL. X—NO. 41
- M ~~~ • . — CHARLOTTE, N. C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27,1941
92.00 ftrYi
LEGISLATOR SAYS “BOB” DISGRACE
TO THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA;
APOLOGIZES FOR SUPPORTING HIM
RALEIGH, Feb 23.—United States
Senator Robert R. Reynolds of Ashe*
ville, who recently took a stud
against the pending lease-lend bill al
lowing aid to Britain, was denounced
in the State House of Representatives
yesterday as a man who had brought
disgrace to North Carolina.
In an unusual departure from leg*
islative procedure, Representative
Grady Withrow of Rutherford coun
ty rose on a “point of special order”
and flayed Reynolds in a manner
seldom heard on the floors of the gen
eral assembly.
In his speech, delivered in an emo
tional tone, he did not mention the
junior senator by name, but he asked
that Reynolds’ name be inserted in
the House Journal, together with a
statement declaring that Representa
tive Withrow expressed "disapproval
of the junior senator’s stand on the
Britiish aid bill.
Withrow, after gaining the floor,
said, "We have in Washington a man
whom I helped put there, and I want
to"l?ort!iCaroiina," he continued,
"has been disgraced in the American
union during the last few daps. . . .
I’d say that the man who doesn’t like
Uncle Sammy ought to go back where
he came from."
He asserted that “the man” had
spent several years in Germany, and
•Booted:
“If he were over there now. Hitler
would put a purple robe on him. a
ring on his finger, and everything
else.”
TRANSPORTATION AND LABOR
BT ML CHARLES STELZLE
Is one of Us stories Kipling said tkat “Transportation is civilisation.”
He meant that whan we readi the state when only ons law is rogeired—a
tew tkat covered aU tews—ths only “thou skah not" would be ene wkkk
stated tkat "tkon afcklt not do anytking wkte kiaterferes witk traffic and all
tkat It implies." Sack a tow wonld please tke drivers of tke S2.0M.Hd anto
aoUloo and basses in ass in this country; tke l.OM.dM employee of American
railroads; and tke conations millions who mo other means oftransi
roaos: ana um evuums .___transportation.
An important factor in preventing ‘Interference witk traffic" is tke
building of good roads. This involves millions of workers whose business It
to to constract sack roods and keep them in good repair. Just now W.P.A.
workers are doing a satisfactory Job in thtercspect. During the put flw
years they have constructed more than MMM mites of highway, roads and
streets. This about equals ISd roadways running clear across the continent.
Military experiences abroad have demonstrated that there cannot be too
many rends, so tkat these workers have done mock to help defend tke nation
ia rs»+ of war and war prevents tke building up of civilisation.
Kipling was right: "Transportation ia Civilisation." White tke cities
built by transportation will bo great centripetal forces, drawing te tkem
sehrM all tke resources ef wide areas because of transportation facilities,
tkev will ateo bo powerful centrifugal forces sending oat their influences
iueverydirection. >>These of us who ttys in them. dtie. should make their in
•£thrtth.y wfll create s crater and finer dvWsation.
reads and dties which shall Mess mankind will be built by La
Iters ef tke world. Butwkether “tke wilderness and tke seHt
by building the n
||qH p0M|^ltv
ef trsaspertaten
„„ to continue its work by keeping the arteries
the free traffic of tke nation at all times.
Hairy Stalk Goes
With Standard
Printing Co.
Henry A. Stalls, president of Char
lotte Typographical Union, is doing a
little promotion work for the Stand
ard Printing Co. these days, haring
been given a leave of absence from
his regular position for this purpose,
and The Journal is informed that he
is making some headway. Brother
Stalls, it will be recalled, was one of
the founders of The Labor Journal,
along with the present editor and
publisher. He has ability along many
lines, but not a Jack of all trades. He
is a thoroughly conmetent printer, a
fluent writer and has even dipped
into poultry raising and running
newspapers, as a side line. We wish
him lock, and believe that he will |
accomplish the mission upon which
he was sent.
The Navy’s new amphibian tank,
petrodeum powered, weighs 8,000 lbs.,
is 20 feet long and eight feet wide.
It travels 26 miles an hour on land,
and 8 1-2 miles an hour in water.
It looks like a machine from Mara.
Patronize Journal Advertiaera
Journal Readers Co-operate With Those
Who Advertise In It
Hi MARCH OF LABOR
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Firefighters Within Their Rights
Hie story regarding the Firemen’s local and Chief Pal*
mer, in this morning's Observer, gave a statement from Presi
dent J. A. Scoggins and. “Jack” Moore, of the Machinists
Union, the latter having been largely instrumental in organ
ising the Firefighters local. The condition is one to be de
plored, but the Firefighters are within their rights and have
committed no crime in organizing into a Union, for most of
the larger cities, as well as many under 100,000 population,
are so organized, and Chief Palmer knows it full well. It is
a non-strikable union, working for the betterment of their
condition in a legitimate way, asking the co-operation of other
Labor bodies in securing legislation that will assure them of
some benefits to whkh they are entitled to, considering the
hazardous occupation in which they are engaged. Charlotte’s
fire department is composed of a high type of citizenship,
each and every one being loyal to his duty, and with long
citizenship in Charlotte.
It seems that a misunderstanding at first caused Presi
dent Fred W. Baer to make the statement he did in the first
place and which after coming into the true facts in the case
he saw differently, and agreed with the Firefighters.
At any rate, peace and harmony is desired. Chief Pal
mer is a man very popular in Charlotte; a man who has made
a good chief, and it is our hope that he will see the Firemen’s
viewpoint, and that they will see his. Many men, who, in
former days have been anti-tmion, have become believers in
the fellowship of man.
THEN AND NOW
A COMPARISON OF ISSUES AND ALLEGED ISSUES AS
BETWEEN 1917 AND 1941
la 1917 there wee still a live and active labor Movement in all
EuroDean countries except Russia.
hlNl only the United States and the British Empire have free
and volantary labor movements uncontrolled by government.
We know that free and voluntary labor movements have been the
greatest factor in the advancement of democratic processes.
In 1917 each country in the world was content to control its own
form of government and willing that other countries do likewise.
In 1941 (among the larger and forceful nations) only the British
Empire and the United States are* still committeed to the principle of
peace and national independence—to the principles of governments by
consent of the governed.
In 1917, there was no organised war on religion by governmental
forces. In fact too many governments were too close to leadership in
religion for the health of both.
In 1941, (among the larger aid forceful nations) only the United
8tates and the British Empire are committeed to the principle of free*
countries and free speech was still but slightly restricted in most en
lightened countries.
In 1941 these fundamental freedoms are destroyed in all larger and
forceful nations except the United States and the British Empire.
Strangely' enough, the commercial war for trade and spheres of
influence which was the beginning and the essence of the world war in
1914, finally dragged the United States into the war. However, the
propaganda used was idealistic—the slogan was “Make the world safe
for democracy.”
In INI when all that a free people deem most sacred and indis
pensable is being threatened and destroyed, the propaganda is material
istic, "Defend only our own shores.”
In 1917 there was no real threat to the existence of the capitalist
system of production and distribution. Only Russia broke up through
defeat in war and it waa expected to recover from its radical "expert
■lent***
In INI every major country in the world has been compelled to
control its economy. The United States has begun the gradual slide
into a wartime economy which means governmental control over all
important industrial defense functoins. Questions are already being
raked as to whether it is worthwhile to save England from defeat if
after the war England will be controlled by labor or turn socialistic
in its national economy.
In 1917 the national debt of the United States was practically noth
ing and thousands of adOionaires were created through war profits.
In 1941, the national debt of the United States is so great that
these who must pay the taxes to pay even the interest on the debt are
decrying any further increase especially if that increase in the national
debt is used to send the British Empire the only ldnd of help it can use
and for which it can never pay in goods or money.
In 1917 money did the talking but told a story appealing to the
idealism of the American people.
In INI money is doing far leas talking and putting the brakes
mi wherever possible to prevent following the policy of government
control every other war-torn country has adopted.
In 1917 we were appalled by atrocity stories each side told about
the other.
In INI atrocities occur daily and nightly and no man, wonmn or
child in a war tone is given any consideration as a non-combatant.
Atrocities are accepted as a part of war.—Woodruff Randolph in
Typographical Journal.
Fly the FLAG
| TH A. F. OF L. 8TAND6 WITH AND FOR THE FLAG |
SUBSCRIBE TO THE CHARLOTTE LABOR JOURNAL
CHARLOTTE CENT
WITH PACKED
MUCH IMPORT;
MINUTES OF THE REGULAR
MEETING. FEBRUARY M, 1941
The meeting was called to order by
President Scoggins, with the invoca
tion by Chaplain Ernest Morgan, and
the minutes of the previous meeting
were read and approved, after all the
assembled delegates pledged allegi
ance to the Flag.
Credentials from the Railway
Clerks, and the Terrasso workers lo
cals were read and acepted, with C.
B. Meacham of the Express clerks be
ing obligated.
Reports of various regular and spe
cial committees were made, after the
roll call of officers, and the roll call
of delegates and locals followed as
usual.
The Anti-Sabotage bill (a mis
nomer) was announced as being de
feated in committee at Raleigh with a
suitable substitute being accepted.
It was announced that the Winston
Salem Fire Fighters Aas*n. is about
100 per cent efficient already.
waaaaanwwwwwwwwvw
WHO'S WHO
IN UNIONS
I W. WARREN SMITH |
W. WARREN SMITH
W. Warren Smith, President of
the Tobacco Workers' International
Union, is the most recently elected
president of an American Federa
tion of Labor Union. He joined the
Tobacco Workers* Union when
Brown and Williamson of Louis
ville was Unionised in 1933. Mr.
Smith is the aggressive typo of
Labor leader ana has succeeded in
keeping the forces of his organisa
tion united. ,
Mr. Smith was the leader in his
Local No. 185 in Louisville. He
led the fight for a new constitution
at the International Convention in
1940.'^ It was due to his quality of
leadership in this successful fight
that he was chosen as the President
of this International Union. Mr.
Smith has entered into his task
with vigor and has launched a pow
erful campaign to increase the
membership.
During the first World War Mr.
Smith served thirteen months over
seas as a member of the Marine
Corps. Upon returning from
France he became an active mem
ber of the Radio Telegraphers*
Union. Later he joined the Tobacco
Workers* Union and became a
staunch advocate of the Union
Label as a means of advertising
Union-made tobacco products to the
His ad$ress> is: Mr. W. Warren
Smith, President, Tobacco Workers’
International Union, Rooms 8M
809, Realty Rnilding, Louisville,
TOBACCO WOBUOUT LABEL
This Union Label, attached to a
tobacco product, assures consumers
that it is made in a 100 per cent
Union shop. It further assures the
tobacco users that the package eon*
tains cigarettes or tobacco of the
highest quality. The tobacco work
ers’ Union Label was adopted in
1896. Its use has increased from
100 million in 1900 to more than
two billion in 1989.
When baying cigarettes, pipe
tobacco, snuff or cnewing tobacco
please ask for the brands carrying
the blue Union Label of the Tobacco
Workers’ International Union.
For further information regard
ing Union Labels, Shop Cards and
Service Buttons, write Mr. L M.
Oraburn, Secretary-Treasurer,
Union Label Trades Department,
American Federation of
Buildira “ ‘
RAL LABOR UNION
HALL TRANSACTS
LNT BUSINESS
The motion passed to instruct the
secretary to write President Green of
the A. F. of Ik, re the formation of a
sincere and radio artists union for
the Charlotte community. The secre
tary immediately reported that the
A. r. of M. covered instrumentalists,
and not singers, and answered various
questions as to the jurisdiction of each.
The A. P. of L. Wage and Hour MU
for the State has been withdrawn by
our legislative committee at Raleigh
in favor of Governor Broughton's pro*
posal to remove the exemptions in the
present bilL
It was reported that the L T. U.
was in process of getting through a
vote to re-affiliate withthe A. t. of
L
A motion passed unanimously mak
ing Brother Claude Albea an honor
ary member of the C. L. XL, and ha
expressed his appreciation of same.
Various communications were aeted
upon. The letter from Chief Palmer
regarding the Fire Fighters bills was
received as information and ordered
to be turned over to the Fire Fight
ers Association. A report of the ac
tivities on this legislation was gene
into at length.
The meeting adjourned after mush
discussion for the good of the order.
WM. 8. GREENE, !
Carolina Lino. Co.
Changes Hands;
Luna At Head
. The management of the Carolina
s-rtSS ‘j&r.r'jssi
hands, passing from Messrs. Murray
and Dosh to the management and
control of Byron Luna, formerly with
the Charlotte News. Mr. Luna is an
expert craftsman, and will be assisted
by J. H. Honeycutt, who has been
with the concern for a number of
years. This concern does "Linotyping
for the Trade" and was founded many
years ago by J. C. Bomar, later pass
ing into the hands of Messrs. Murphy
and Dosh. This concern has a long
record of service and the business has
been built up by quality composition,
quick and courteous service, and a
desire to create a really worthwhile
Linotyping composition service. The
Journal has for ten years been served
by the Carolina Linotyping Co.
The former owners are going to
take it easy; Dosh going Florida
way—Murphy, hither and you, no cm
knows where. He was complaining
of itching feet—so the fever of spring
must have gotten into his bones.
Here’s luck to all of them-the
“goers out" and ths “comers in."
TEAMSTERS MAT
MOVE OFFICES
TO WASHINGTON
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind.-John M.
Gillespie, assistant to President Dan
iel J. Tobin of the International
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chanf
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of
America for twenty-five years, sms
elected secretary-treasurer of the
union at a meeting of the Interna
tional Executive Board, Mr. Tobin
announced.
It was also revealed by Mr. Tobin
that the Executive Board considered
removal of union headquarters from
Indianapolis to Washington and in
structed him to investigate building
conditions there.
Sec.-Treas Meany
Is Appointed On
Planning Board
WASHINGTON, D. C.—Harry L.
Hopkins, former Secretary of Com
merce and President Roosevelt's re
cent personal emmissary to Great Bri
tain. was appointed a member of the
Office of Production Management's
Production Planning Board. The eight
other members of the board, which
will be under the direction of Pro
duction Chief John D. Birgers, in
cluded representatives of the Navy,
the Army, organised labor and
try.
George Meany, secretary-treasurer
of the American Federation of Labor,
was included in the labor section of
the committee.
i
    

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