North Carolina Newspapers

    Anti-Strike Bill May
Force Arbitration In
Future Negotiations
WaRhint-ton, D. C.—stern con
demnation of the Herter Bill to
punish strikers in the public
utilities field was expressed by
fioris Shiskin. AFL economist, in
£■ re cent radio debate with Rep.
Verier of Massachusetts, author
of the bill.
■Such a measure, Mr. Shishkin
warned, could “never reach the
roots of the trouble—the causes
of industrial disputes—and would
only delay our working out a real
notation.”
'This legislation, Mr. Shishkin
-asserted, could be applied, if
passed, to almost all labor dis
putes. Mr. Herter conceded this
was true, depending upon the In
terpretation of this bill which is
aimed at prohibition of strikes
"involving interstate or foreign
commerce, or stoppages “which
result in or threaten to result in
danger to public health or safety.”
Agreeing witl\ Mr. Herter that
dovernment seisure “will not
work" and declaring that "com
pulsory arbitration awards will
siot work, either,” Mr. Shishkin
, declared:
“In a free society, human re
lations cannot be forced. Every
work stoppage brings hardship,
especially to' the v. orkers involved.
Workers don’t strike unless they
have a real grievance. My point
ia t iat the only way to insure
jndu trial peace is to eliminate
rthe causes of strikes. Compul
jsory arbitration will not work in
tthese, special areas of public In
terest any more than in any other
industry or trade.
"•I certainly agree that our in
sdustrial relations have been in a
mess for the last couple of years.
The crucial point being overlooked
is that the strikes since V-J Day
were not brought about by any
breakdown in collective bargain
ing. Almost all of their, v/cra
wage disputes brought about by
one thing; inflation. This involves
wages, prices and profits, and
.whether we arc ready to have
these issues determined by a gov
ernment tribunal, and a political
ly-mnded tribunal, to boot. The
question we must come to grips
with is how- labor disputes can
best be settled.
| “I can’t be done by compul
sion. You can’t wipe out the es
sential freedom of contract, which
is the basis of good industrial
relations, and preserve private
enterprise. If you start tamper
ing with freedom of c ontract,
where are you going to draw the
line? How can you arbitrate
rights ? And how about prop
erty rights? Are they, also, sub
ject to compulsory adjudication?"
Summing up hit view of the
broad labor-management picture,
Mr. Shishkin said:
“I would recommend, as an
approach, specific methods of
working out indsutrial problems
which would, really work and
which would strengthen, instead
of undermining, our private in
terprises system. A recent rec
ommendation of the Labor Man
agement Advisory Committee of
the U, ..^^Conciliation Service, in
which the employer members—
top management men designated
by the NAM — were in perfect
agreement with the labor men, of
whom I am one, stated that “in
cases of national importance,
where normal mediation has failed
and the parties consent, emerg
ency hoards of inquiry should be
appointed from outside the Feder
I al Government to conduct hear
ings on the issues and to publish
findings based upon evidence sub
mitted at theae hearings. The
committee believess that any form
| of compulsory arbitration or ‘su
, per machinery for disposition of
i labor disputes may frustrate,
rather than foster, industrial
peace.’"
Send in your subscription to Tho
Journal today!
WILL THESE LITTLE PIGS
GO TO MARKET?
They have a 30 per cent better chance
of reaching marketing age under their. ^
electric brooder than they would have
If left with their mother. (
For the first ten days or so after
birth, baby pigs huddle close to their
mother. When she lies down or turns
over they are in danger of being killed
or injured. Under an electric brooder
they are both warm and safe.
One pig killed often means loss instead
of profit on the whole litter. Here is
just one more instance of how elec*
tricity can help to decrease risk and
Increase profit on your farm.’ „
DUKE) POWER COMPANY
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UMO A CM O’
9
Atomic Commission
Okays The Check-Off
Atlanta.—An AFL union con
tract with {ffe manufacturers of
atomic energy for civilian use
has been approved by the U. S.
Atomic Commission.
The contract between the AFL
Atomic Trades Council and the
Monsanto Chemical Co. m Oak
Ridge, Tenn., was approved by
David Lilenthal, chairman of the
commission, and endorsed by the
War Department; George L.
tiooge, AFL southern director,
said. „
The contract covering workers
in the Clinton Laboratories ope
rated by the company includes:
1. Wage increases ranging
from 6 to 20 cents an hour.
2. Time and a half for over
time.
. ■ *$■ „
3. Two weeks’ yearly vacation
with pay.
Googe said the wage increases
are retroactive to December 14.
The 6-cent increase affects only
the top pay group. Hourly rates
range from an 82 1-2 cent min
imum for janitors and unskilled
laborers to $2.02 1-2 for elec
tronic instrument mechanics. The
rate for journeymen mechanics
in practically all other occupa
tions is $1.18 1-2 an hour.
The contract, the AFL said,
contains a provision barring work
steppe ir.-s, lockouts and slow
. low! 'The union guaranteed its
support to thd; company in main
taining productive operations.
V" “The contract has ideal fea
tures,” Googe said, “every prob
lem of management and labor has
been carefully considered and ad
quate provisions made in the
igreement for their equitable
handling and adjustment with1
fair dealing to all.”
Featured in the contract are:
union dues check-off, a special
grievance board with equal com
pany Snd union representation,
arbitration of any disputes with
the company, and employe sen
iority clause, special provisions
under the agreement for the set- |
tlement of jurisdictional disputes,
also disability for non-occupa
tional illness.
Radiomen On Ship
Lines Make Gains
New York City— Announcement
was made here by the Radio Of
ficers’ Union (AFL) of the sign
ing of new agreements with 45
ship lines providing for salary in
creases ranging up to |21 a
month. J
More than 4,000 officers on
2,000 vessels, including the Na
tion’s two largest passenger ships,
the United States Lines’ America
and Washington, benefited by
the agreement, it was revealed by
Fred M. Howe, general secretary
treasurer of the 16-year-old union.
The contracts, effective from
last October 1 until next Sep
tember 30, provide for overtime
pay of |1.60 and hour on dry
cargo ships. This provision al
ready is in effect on the privately
owned ships that have contracts
with the union. Application on
Government-owned vessels must
be approved by the Maritime
Commission.
The overtime rate is 10 cents
an hour higher than that paid to
radio' operators who are members
of the American Communications
Association (CIO) under that un
ion’s current contract.
The ROU overtime scale on
tankers has been set at 91.70.
Mr. Howe announced. Eleven
tanker companies are among those
under contract to the union.
Deeming thqt the contract
with operators of dry cargo ves
sels was a standard contract, Mr.
Howe said: *
“It has taken two years to get
these companies to agree on a
common date."
Previously there had been sep
arate agreements, he adgsd. *
Hie pay on freight ships that
carry only one radio officer will
be 9354 a month. On freighters
with more than one radio officer,
$271 a month; first assistant,
$246.50, and second assistant,
$234.50.
On the liners America and
Washington, the chief radio of
flcen will deceive $333.50 a month:
the first assistant, $296.50, -the
second assistant, $274.50, and the
third assistant, $259.50.
Another feature was a clause
calling for transportation of a
radio officer dismissed at a port
other than that at which he joined
the ship back to the port where
he signed articles.
The agreement also specified
eleven categories of work for
which overtime - pay may be
charged. ,
LAUNDRY WORKERS GAIN
Washington, D. Ci—The Wage
and Hour Administration has is*
sued as important ruling which
will affect the worknig conditions
of laundry workers favorably. It
provides that laundry and dry
cleaning establishments servicing
commercial accounts engaged in
interstate commerce are subject
to the Wage and Hour La. Laun
dries in this category will be
brought under the minimum wage
and time and a half after 4C
hours.
EMERGENCY MEET CALLED
New York City—The New York
Central Trades and, Labor Council
was aked to hold an emergency
meeting of all AFL locals to act
against threatened anti-labor leg
islation in a resolution adopted
by the joint board of the Hotel
and Restaurant employes Interna
tiona] Alliance, lids board rep
resents 11 locals with 60,000 mem
AFL EXPERTS SEE
BETTER DAYS AHEAD
(Continned From Pare 1)
ment to make this year. Hasty
and irresponsible action by anions
or employers could bring about
a depression with widespread loss
of jobs and incomes for workers.
Hasty action by Congress cou'd
destroy worker’s freedom and
limit collective bargaining. If
ever there was a year which
called for good judgment and
economic statesmanship on the
part of unions, employers and
Congressmen, it is 1947.
“Production shifts will not be
easy. Consumers have already
made up many of their short
ages in soft goods, sucn as cloth
ing. The demand for high-priced
luxuries, furs, jewelry, etc., is
falling off $ sales and marked
downs in stores, especially in
women’s clothings, show that
people will no longer buy shoddy
goods at high prices; competi
tion is forcing stores to demand
better quality goods at lower
prices from factories. Business
observers forecast that sales of
soft goods will decline during the
year, bringing production cuts
and layoffs in plants producing
them.”
Pointing out that the worst
result of the wage price form
ula of 1946 was that most work
ers did not even get an 18-cent
increase, the report declared:
“From V-i Day to December,
1946, cost of living rose slightly
more than 18 per cent, but it is
safe to estimate that no more
than 40 j?er cent of American
workers received wage increases
of as much as 18 cents during
this period. The President’s ec
onomic report sums it all up by
showing that the ‘real’ per capita
income or buying power of the
American people as a whole
dropped 5 per cent from 1945 to
1946 due to price increases, and
that workers took the heaviest
losses."
Asserting the low income
groups had lost “billions in buy
ing power of savings,” the re
port continued:
“One serious feature of a price
rise is that it cuts away the
buying power of people's savings,
war bonds and insurance. A fam
ily who had $1,500 in a savings
account in 1939 can get no more
with it today than they could
buy for $100 when they invested.
Workers want to see prices come
down in 1947 to restore the buy
ing power of their savings.” "
Discussing profits as they re
fer to the creation of jobs, the
report said:
“The business man's profit in a
free enterprise economy serve*
two useful purposes, both of
which raise workers’ living stand
ards. It creates better products
at lower costs and expands pro
duction, increasing productivity,
creating more jobs, more con
sumer goods and making higher
wages possible.
“The effort of business men to
make a profit in competition with
each other, under <pr system
of free enterprise and strong la
bor unions, has made American
industry the most efficient and
productive, and American living
standards the highest in the
world. It is interesting that to*
day in Soviet Russia, where there
are not profits, no free unions,
and industry is a state monopoly,
production lags because manage*
ment is inefficient. Workers’
living standards are at poverty
levels and ‘real’ wages have de
clined. '''he many purges of
managers for intiTiciency have
not raised Russian workers to
decent levels of living. Russi
destroys the incentive to pro
duce. " '
“The outlook for increased pro
ductivity and maintenance o
profits in 1947 ssuggests that in
dustry in general can raise work
ers’ pay without increasini
prices. AFL unions have recent
ly been winning, without strike
wage increases which vary fron
10 to 37 1*2 cents per hour.
WIRING : LIGHTING FIXTURES
APPLIANCES
REPAIRS
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ECONOMY ELECTRIC COMPJINY
109 West Sixth Street Charlotte, N. C.
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CHARLOTTE, N. C
    

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