North Carolina Newspapers

    CHARLOTTE LABOR JOURNAL & DIXIE FARM NEWS
Published Weekly at Charlotte, N. C.
a. A. Stalls, Editor~and Publisher W. M. Witter. Associate Editor
Catered as second-class mail matter September 11, 1981, at the Post
Office at Charlotte. N. C., under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $2.00 per year, payable in advance or
6c per copy.
ADVERTISING RATES for commercial advertising reasonable.
Official Organ of the Charlotte Central Labor Union and Approved by
The American Federation of Labor and -the
North Carolina Federation of l^bor__
Address All .Communications to Post Office Box 1061
Telephones 3-3094 and 4-5602
Office of Publication: 118 East Sixth Street, Charlotte. N. C.
The Labor Journal will not be responsible for opinions of corro
apondents, but any erroneous reflecting upon the character, standing or
reputation of anv person, firm or corporation which may appear in
Se columns of The Labor Journal will be gladly corrected when called
Id the attention of the publisher. Correspondence and Open horum
opinions solicited. _ ■_• ___
Editorial
CITES DANGERS IN BILLS JO WEAKEN LABOR
Blunt questioning of the wisdoirt of legislative proposals
“which are confessedly designed to weaken labor s position
at the bargaining table” was Raised by U. S. Secretary
Schwellenbach in an address before the National Textile
Seminar.
“One set of proposals," Mr. Schwellenbach told the meet
ing, “seeks to prevent industry-wide bargaining and pro
vide other restrictions which will limit the scope of a given
union agreement within an industry. The textile'indust^*
and more particularly the men’s and woman’s clothing in
ustry, has had considerable experience in this field. You
know how flexible such contracts are and what a wide
range of problems and conditions they are capable of meet
ing. Do you not share my belief that these bargaining
systems have brought more stable industrial relation?
The purpose of restrictions on the scope of bargaining,
he said, is to “prevent complete or widespread shutdowns
caused by a labor management dispute” and “to protect
employers within an industry from the economic pressure
which unions might otherwise be able to exert.”
Mr. Schwellenbach said, regarding shutdowns, he found
no’reason to believe that a ban on industry-wide bargain
ing would prevent them. He observed that there was no
industry-wide contract in the steel industry when pro
duction was sharply reduced early in 1946. “There is the
further fact," he added, “that this sort of curb would
offer no solution to the problems raised by stoppages af
fecting local public utilities or transportation systems.”
Citing a recent Bureau of Labor "Statistics study show
ing the important industries which, now bargain on a na
tional or industry-wide scale, those bargaining by geograph
ical or regional areas and those bargaining within a city,
county or metropolitan area, Mr. Schwellenbach said it
“shows quite clearly that proposals which would narrow
the scope of bargaining, either witljin an industry or a
geographical area, would also dislocate established pro
cedures in such industries as glass and hardware, dyeing
and finishing textile, hometal mining and paper and pulps.
The list could be extended, but it is already long enough
to indicate the disruptive character of these listing pro
posals.”
Concerning propasls to cut down the pconomic power of
unions at the bargaining table, Mr. Schwellenbach said he
did “not see how this could promote a better economic
balance or improve the industrial climate. On the con
trary,” he emphasized, “I fear the opposite result.”
Another group of proposals, aimed at the closed shop
and kindred forms of security, would, he said, affect the
status of about 11,000,000 union workers.
“Coming at the very moment when other restrictive
measures are directed against labor,” he asserted, “it is
plain that such curbs would open a vertiable Pandora’s
Box of labor troubles.”
TO ALL UNION MEMBERS:
» (Continued From, 1)
port. Presidential veto and sustaining such veto.
2. Resolutions, petitions, telegrams, letters by any of
ficer will not be sufficient, only letters in each member's
own words will have full effect.
Fraternally yourl,
WILLIAM GREEN, President, .
GEORGE MEANY, Secretary-Treasurer.
American Federation of Labor.
THE MARCH OF LABOR
(VV7 ' 7 *
^Xfo^LPWARVtTS
COAPft ISE 17% CF the
TOTAL MAAMACTU»»NG
feeCES OF THE U.S.
Of about itso.coo
«*$•«*-tt> vote,
less-Hun fco.ooo
voted >n-tV lost
LARGEST
settlement IN
THE MISTORVOE
Jfe
TWE wAOiJER ACT V^AS
MADE iM J0lY.i946.\aMW
m 8E«WSHI« WiTOMS
MlUS OF f?EADiNO/'RAy
PAID $ BOOkOOO TolUE
WOkV ERS NUO<3n2LCK AT
PlANT IN 1937. r
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?fl«UWlO»JtA8Ci, miS US THAT TWC
pf3O0CCX IS UMOJ-MADe. Kbu GAA? «
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1
AFL 1947 Convention Calendar!
(Following is a list of conven
tions Scheduled for this year by
National and International Un
ions and State Federations of La
bor under the’ banner of the
American Federation of Labor.
This list is not> complete. Addi
tion will be announced later.)
May 19—Missouri State Feder
ation of Labor—Springfield.
May 19 — Int. Plate, Printers
and Die Stampers — New York
City.
May 21—Georgia State Federa
tion of Labor—Savannah.
May 26—Arkansas State Feder
ation of Labor—Little Rock.
May 26—Arkansas State Fed
eration of Labor—Little Rock.
May 26—Md.-DC Federat'on of
Labor—Baltimore.
June 9 — American Federation
of Mucisians—Detroit.
June 9—Switchmen’s Union of
North America—Buffalo.
June 12—Maine State Federa
tion of Labor—Lewiston.
June 14—South Dakota State
Federation of Labor—Sioux Falls.
June 16—Colorado State Feder
ation of Labor—Grand Junction.
June 16—Boot and Shoe Work
ers—Cincinnati.
June 16—Int. Ladies’ Garment
W orkers—Cleveland.
June 23—Michigan State Fed
eration of Labor—Marquette.
June 26—South Carolina State
Federation of Labor—Greenville.
June 30—Texas State Federa
tion of Labor—Dallas.
July 2—National Brotherhood
Operative Potters—Chicago.
July 8—International Associa
tion of Longshoremen—New York
City.
July 14—Washington State Fed
eration of Labor—Seattle.
July 4—Int. Assn, of Protective
Retail Clerks—San Francisco.
July 14—Bro. Locomotive Fire
men and Enginemen—San Fran
cisco.
July 21 — International Union
Stove Mounters—Kalamazoo.
July 21—Int. Stereotypers and
Electrotypers—Montreal, Can.
July 28— Railroad Yardmasters
of America—Portland, Oregon.
•Aug—Nevada State Federation
of Labor—Ely.
Aug. 4—California State Feder
ation of Labor—San Diego.
Aug. 5—Iowa State Federation
of Labor—Keokuk.
Aug. 11—North Carolina State
Federation of Labor—Wilmington.
Aug. 11 — United Garment
Workers of America — Oshkosh,
Wis.
Aug. 11—Int. Bro. Teamsters,
Chauffeurs—San Francisco.
Aug. 18 — International Typo
graphical Union—Cleveland, Ohio.
Aug. 18 — Interntional Photo
Engravers Union—Chicago, 111.
Aug. 18—Wisconsin, State Fed
eration of Labor—Green Bay.
Aug. 18—Utah State Federa
tion of Labor—Provo. •
Sept. 8—Ama). Ass’n Street anil
Electric Ry.—Los Angeles.
Sept. 8- International Chemical
Workers Washington, D. C.
Sept. 8—Nebraska State Fed
e ation of Labor—Hastings.
Sept. 8- Kentucky State Feder
ation of Labor—Bowi ng Green.
Sept. 9 Connecticut State Fed
eration of Labor—Undecided.
Sept. 9—United Ass’n Plum
bers and Steamfitters—Undecided.
Sept. 11—Oklahoma State Fed
eration of Labor—McAlester.
Sept. 11—Arisona State Fed
eration of Labor—Tucson.
’ Sept. 12 — Int. Un on Wood.
Wire and Metal Lathers — Los
Angles.
Sept. 16—Ohio State Federation
of Labor—Cincinnati.
Sept. 15—Int. Bro. Pulp, Sul
phite and Paper Mill Wks.—Mil
waukee.
x Sept. 16—Minnesota State Fed
eraton of Labor—Hibbing.
Sept. 18—Brotherhood Railroad
Trainmen--Miami Beach, Fla.
Sept. 20—New Hampshire State
Federation of Labor—Concord.
Sept. 20 -American Wire Weav
ers Protective Assn’—New York
City.
Sept—Mississippi State Federa
tion of Labor—Jackson.
Sept. 22—Illinois State Feder
ation of Labor—Peoria.
Sept. 25—West Virginia State
Federation of Labor—Charleston.
Sept. 29 — Metal Trades De
partment—San Francisco.
Oct. 1—Building and Construe
May 1 — Pennsylvania State
Federation of Labor — Harris
burg. '' -
May 2—Kansas State Federa
tion of Labor—Wichita.
May 6—Wall Paper Craftsmen
and Workers—New York.
May 5—International Coopers’
U nion—Cincinnati.
May 5—Tennessee State Fed
e ration of Labor—Johnson City.
May 11—Virginia State Federa
tion of Labor—Richmond.
May 12—Brotherhood of Rail
way Clerks—Cincinnati,
tion Trades Dept.—San Franc’sco.
Oct. 2—New Mexico State Fed
eration of Labor—Carlsbad.
Oct. 3 — Union Label Trades
Department—San Francisco.
•Oct.—Railway Mail Associa
tion—Jacksonville, Fla.
Oct. 6—International Asbestoa
Workers—Undecided.
Oct. 20—Commercial Telegraph
ers Union—Los Angeles.
Nov. 17—International Auto
mobile Workers—Milwaukee.
Dec. 6—International Bill Pott
ers—Chicago. •
•Date not definitely set.
LUMBER PRICES SOAR
FAR ABOVE PAY RISES
Portland. Ore.—Wage increases
totaling 38 cents an hour sine#
November, 1948, haVe increased j
the production cost of |iine only
$5.25 per thousand board feet and I
fir $4.66, but quoted lumber price
increases for the same period
! amount to $20.80 and $27.12 per
thousand for pine and fir, accord
| ing to a survey by the Lumber
and Sawmill Workers (AFL).
The study, based on a 1940 fir ■
survey and a 1942 pine report, J
“indicates conclusively that to;
maintain industry profits equal i
i to the 1945 level, the® price of
i pine should have been increased
; only $10.50' per thousand and
Douglas fir $9.32 per thousand,'’
Executive Secretary Kenneth Da
i vis of the union’s northwestern
1 council declared.
Davis declared present profits
in Douglas fir of $29.20 per thou
sand proved the industry could
increase wages “more than what
seems to be the national pattern
—15c per hour—and still receive
a 200 per cent to 400 per cent
profit increase over November,
1941, prices.
“And there is still plenty left
in that 200 per cent to 400 per
cent profit increase range to take
care, of paid holidays, better va
cations and health and welfare
funds,” he concluded.
r r C..1KLI
DEPRESSION DISCOUNTED
.BY EWAN CLAGUE
(Continued From Page 1)
proportion of older people will
become greater. There are now
10 million people over the age of
65; in 40 years there will be 20
! million people over 65. This fact
has important implications for
social planning. As older people
become a larger proportion of
, »ur population, more emphasis
I may be placed on provision of
| medical, educational and social
services to th s group.
PRINTERS HIT BII.L TO EASE
PRESS WIRE RESTRICTIONS
, Washington, D. C.—The Inter
national Typographical Un:on
j t A FL > has issued a statement
urging defeat of the Mason bill j
I to exempt the Associated Press .
and other press services from the
Sherman anti-trust act.
Signed by President Woodruff 1
Randolph, Vice-President Larry
Taylor, Vice-President Elmer'
Brown and Secretary-Treasurer
Don F. Hurd, the statement was
put in. the record by a House
Judiciary Subcommittee.
The ITU quoted a convention
resolution assailing the Mason
bill and recalled that for many
years previous ITU conventions
I "have taken action decrying the
practical impossibility of estab
lishment of new newspapers in
cities where all the news serv
ices had already sold their prod
uct to one local newspaper al
ready in the field.”
“If the principle of the Mason
bill is sound, then the manu
facturers of presses, linotype ma
chines and other newspaper equip
! ment as well as newsprint could
j be authorised to act likewise and
forever freeze the channel* of
news and the bpportunity to pro
duce newspapers. Freedom of
the press would then be freedom
to suppress and the public would
be at the mercy of thoee already j
in the newspaper business.”
CHARLOTTE PRINTERS
ELECT NEW OFFICERS
(Continued From Page 1)
amend an article of the union’s
international constitution to in
crease the salaries of I. T. U. of
ficers, the president and ' secre
tary-treasurer to 110,000 a year
and the first and second vicC pres
idents to 17,500 a year.
unless we act
lu/S
will die of
GIVE
TOCONQUERCANCER
GREEN AND MEANY WARN
ANTI-UNION BILLS CARRY
THREATS TO EVERY WORKER
(Continued From Page 1)
ern life. If this happens, it will
adversely afTec-t the farmer, the
business man, the professional
man, the small manufacturer and
everyone else who is dependent
on the wage earner's income for
a market for his goods or serv
ices.
“This legislation would change
our economy from a free economy
to an economy of control by
courts and Government agencies.
It would mark, a definite turning
point in our history.
“Said Senator Taft, speaking
of his anti-labor bill. ‘This bill
covers about three-quarters of the
matters pressed on us very stren
uously by employers.’
“So, there it is—the purpose
of this Taft-Hartley anti-labor
program. Weaken * the unions—
break down the unions. Yes—and
let there be no mistake—the real
purpose is to destroy the unions.”
Uncle Sam Says
Millions of my nieces and neph
ews have go.ie through the experi
ence of signing on the dotted line
for something or other. In fact,
signing on the dotted line Is as
American as the Army-Navy foot
ball game. This month your Uncle
Sam is Salesman lTncle Sam asking
yon to scrawl yonr name on this
payroll savings card where yon
work. Yon will note it reads: “Sign
Up for Security!” It means ex
actly what it says. It will authorise
your employer to save the amount
you specify from your pay every
payday for investment in U. 8. Sav
ings Bonds.
Sign up for security today. Then
buy your extra Savings Bond.
V. S. T*tanry Vrfartmgnt
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