North Carolina Newspapers

    Editorial
charlotte Tabor journal & dixie farm news
Published Weekly »t Charlotte, N. C.
■. A. Stalls, Editor and Publisher W. M. Witter. Associate Editor
Catered as second-elans mall matter September 11, 1981, at the Post
Office at Charlotte, N. C., under the Act of Congress of March I, 1879
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 12.00 per year, payable in advance or
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ADVERTISING RATES for commercial advertising reasonable.
Official Organ of the Charlotte Central Labor Union and Approved by
The American Federation of Labor and the
North Carolina Federation of Labor
Address All Communications to Post Office Bo* 1061
Telephones 3-3094 and 4-6502
Office of Publication: 113 East Sixth Street, Charlotte, N. C.
The Labor Journal will not be responsible for opinions of corre
spondents. but any erroneous reflecting upon the character, standing or
reputation of any person, firm or corporation which may appear to
the columns of The Labor Journal will be gladly corrected when called
to the attention of toe publisher. Correspondence and Open Forum
opinions solicited. ____
AFL LAWYERS PLAN TESJS
Joseph A. Padway, Chief Counsel for the American Fed
eration of Labor, presided at a two-day conference of
lawyers representing AFL unions for consultation on the
effects of the Taft-Hartley Act on labor organizations.
More than 75 lawyers, from the East, Middle West and
South attended the conference. Among the cities repre
sented were New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Baltimore,
Washington, Chicago, Kansas City, Milwaukee, Atlanta,
Mobile and Pressmen’s Home, Tenn.
“The, conference was exploratory and consultative in
nature,” Mr. Padway explained. “We surveyed the immed
iate effects of the new law on labor unions and its long
range impact. > 1
• “Furthermore, we obtained a consensus of opinion among
the lawyers attending on which sections of the law are
clearly unconstitutional so that legal contests can be under
taken without confusion and without delay.
“We were forced to go over every word of every line in
this Act, and do considerable reading between the lines, in
order to determine exactly how the multitudinous and tricky
provisions control and regulate the activities of labor.
“Now that the conference is concluded, a series of bul
letins will be drafted and issued to all AFL unions explain
ing the obligations and responsibilities which the new, law
imposes upon them and their members.”
RABBI DENOUNCES TAFT-HARTLEY LAW
Rabbi Israel M. Goldman, president of the Rabinnical
Assembly of America, said the enactment of the Taft
Hartley Bill is a setback to- “progressive action in behalf
of the common man.”
Speaking before the Assembly’s annual convention, he
said:
“While economists are still debating the question as to
whether a recession is on its way, we religionists can say
that in the field of progressive action in behalf of the com
mon man the recession has already arrived.
"This is attested to by the failure of Congress to pass
extension of effective rent controls and especially by the
passage of the Taft-Hartley Bill, which strikes an unfair
blow at the American labor movement and at American
democracy which produced it.
“The economic royalists so severely castigated by the late
President Roosevelt and driven by him from the temple of
American Government are again setting up their thrones
in the halls of American democracy.
“It becomes our duty as rabbis, as indeed it is the re
sponsibility of all religious leaders, ‘to lift our voices and
spare not’ and to proclaim in trumpet tones the message
of the social and economic and racial justice.
“We must speak out, not in generalities, but in true pro
phetic tradition, by the pointing of the finger and the citing
of the case. We must therefore ever be sensitive to eco
nomic and social conditions and we must keep ourselves
informed about them. We must keep our congregations
informed and we must guide them in right social atti
tudes.”
i -
MEAT CRISIS THREAT TO BUYER’S PURSE
The Nation faces another serious meat shortage which
threatens to drive prices upward to unprecedented heights.
Flood damage in the corn belt is adding to the already
developing shortage.
An indication of the seriousness of the situation is the
statement of Edward A. O’Neal, Conservative president of
the American Farm Bureau Federation, before a joint con
gressional committee. At best, he declared, the country
may have to adopt “voluntary meat rationing” and might
even be required to resort to price control.
To this, Senator Robert A. Taft promptly replied, “Not
a chance.”
The Senate's Republican leader declared “the law of sup
ply and demand yill help keep a kind of ceiling on—if
prices are too high, people will buy less.” He added, “And
we can eat something else.”
The meat shortage crisis was intensified bv the sky
rocketing price of corn. Chicago reports said that for the
third straight day prices quoted on thq Chicago Board of
Trade exchange broke previous records set in 1919.
With prospects of a small corn crop due to heavy flood
damage, the price picture looks dark for the consumer. The
sharp increases on the corn exchange may be reflected at
the retail level within a few months.
Experts predict that the high corn prices will cause
housewives to pay more for their pork chops. Farmers
will find it more profitable to sell their corn at present
boom prices than to use it to fatten hogs for later market
ing The net result will be less pork on the market at con
siderably higher prices to the consumer.
P4JWU flNANCl** REPORT
SHOWS TOTAL RESOURCES
OVER $4$ MILLION
Cleveland. — General fnnds of
the AFL’s International Ladies
Garment Workers Union and its
affiliated locals and joint boards
exceed $20,000/100, according to
a three-year financial report re
leased here at the anion's conven
tion.
In addition to the general funds,
the union is the custodian of
$23,078,439 in employer-contrib
uted health and welfare funds
and of $1380,728 in death ben
efit funds, bringing its total re
sources to $40,878,318.
However, David Dubinsky, the
union’s president and secretary
treasurer, emphasized that the
welfare and death funds were
earmarked for specific purposes
and that it waa the union’s inten
tion at the present convention to
adopt constitutional changes that
would bar their use for strikes
or any other funct on of union
business.
The report explained in detail
how the union’s money had been
spent since the last convention
in Boston in 1944. Mr. Dubinsky
directed special attention to the
expenditure of $9,017,433 on con
tributions to labor, philanthropic
and war relief causes. Every do
nation of $100 or more was ac
counted for in the report.
A wartime gift of $75,000 to
Russian war relief was recorded,,
but there was a conspicuous ab
sence from the list of American
organizations with pro-Communist
leanings. On the other hand, or
ganizations and publications ded
cated to fighting communism in
this country received substantial
contributions.
Dozens of gifts were made to
hospitals and educational institu
tions in all parts of the country,
but the largest donat:ons were
made to war service and war re
lief agencies rendering aid
throughout the world. Mr. Du
binsky told reporters the un
on planned to make further large
contributions to this work through
such agencies as the Jewish La
bor Committee the Italian Labor
committee and the United Jew
ish Appeal.
Despite the healthy financial
condition reflected in the report,
the ILGWU president expressed
concern over the organization’s
ability to continue to meet its ob
ligations to its own members and
to the community without an in
crease in its per capita dues of
15 cents a month. This sum had
not gone up since 1924, despite
sharp rises in the operating ex
penses of the international union
and vast increases in its functions,
Mr. Dubinsky said.
He warned that enactment by
Congress of laws like the Taft
Hartley Labor Bill would neces
sitate a further increase in ex
penses because of the probability
of prolonged and costly litigation.
National Labor Relations Board
proceedings and strike^
He voiced the opinftm that the
sponsors of the Taft-Hartley bill
were primarily interested in
weakening the financial position
of unions in the hope that they
could thus undermine their organi
zational strength.
The home—your home—Is the
bulwark of the nati „
North Carolina,
Mecklenburg Comity.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
Enid Jonea Riggs, Plaintiff, ti.
Daniel O’Dritscoll Riggs,
Defendant.
Notlee of Sendee by Publication
The above named defendant,
Daniel O'DrisaeoIl Riggs, will take
notice that an action entitled as
above has been commenced in the
Superior Court of Mecklenburg
County, North Carolina, by the
plaintiff to obtain an absolute di
vorce upon theh grounds of two
years separation, and the defend
ant will further take notice that
he fa required to appear at the
office <ff the Clerk of Superior
Court of Mecklenburg County at
*•** Court House in Charlotte,
North Carolina, within twenty
(20) days after the I7th day of
July, 1497, which date is at least
seven days after the last publi
cation of this notice, and answer
or demur to the complaint in said
action, or the plaintiff will apply
to the Court for the relief de
manded in said complaint.
This the 13th day of June, 1947.
J. LESTER WOLFE,
Clerk of Superior Court.
(6-19-26; 7-3, 10-c)
North Carolina,
Mecklenburg County.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
Bernice L. Campbell, Plaintiff, vs.
Aileen M. Campbell, Defendant.
Notice of Service by Publication
The above named defendant,
Aileen M. Campbell, will take no
tice that an action entitled as
above has been commenced in the
Superior Court of Mecklenburg
County, North Carolina by the
plaintiff to obtain an absolute di
vorce upon the grounds of two
years separation, and the defend
ant will further take notice that
she is required to appear at the
office of the Clerk of Superior
Court of Mecklenburg County at
the Court House in Charlotte.
North Carolina, within twenty
(20) days after the 17th day of
July, 1947, which date is at least
seven days after the last publica
tion of this notice, and answer or
demur to the complaint in said
action, or the plaintiff will apply
to the Court for the relief de
manded in said complaint.
This the 13th day of June, 1947.
J. LESTER WOLFE.
Clerk of Superior Court.
(6-19-26; 7-3, 10-c)
State of North Carolina,
County of Mecklenburg.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
Lucille Orr Kenny, Plaintiff, vs.
Patrick H. Kenny, Defendant.
Service of Summons by Publication
The defendant above named will
take notice that an action entitled
as above has been commenced in
the Sunerior Court of Mecklen
burg County for the purpose of
obtaining an absolute divorce,
from the defendant on the grounds
of two years separation.
And the defendant will further
take notice that he is required to
appear before the Clerk of the
Superior Court of Mecklenburg
County, North Carolina, within
twenty days from the day on
which service by publication in
the cause is completed, or within
twenty days from the 10th day
of July, 1947, and answer or de
murrer to the complaint filed in
this action, or the plaintiff will
apply to the Court for the relief
demanded in said complaint.
This the 19th day of June, 1947.
J. LESTER WOLFE,
Clerk of Superior Court.
(6-19, 26; 7-3, 10-c)
North Carolina,
Mecklenburg County.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
Dorothy Bowling Gordon, Plain
tiff, vs.
William D. Gordon. Defendant.
Notice of Service by Publication
The above named defendant,
William D. Gordon, will take
notice that an action entitled as
above has been commenced in the
Superior Court of Mecklenburg
County, North Carolina, by the
plaintiff to obtain an absolute di
vorce upon the grounds of two
THE MARCH OF LABOR
'^)VER 200,000 VETS
obtained lcans unoea
TMt 6 i Siuu To Build
Oft Buy HOMES.
(AS Of AU«.'946)
f§g£!ci?ooe**
*apoo.
A,
04CNNVAN t>69i»vCa
1h€ BEST-A UNION -MAC*.
HAT: sec -WAT THE NiXT
HAT BOT tMS"S*S LABil/
i
ears separation, and the de
fendant will further take notice
that he is required tq appear at
the office of the Clerk of Superior
Court of Mecklenburg County at
the Court House in Charlotte,
North Carolina within twenty
(20) days after the 10th day of
July, 1947, which date is at least
•even days after the last publi
cation of this notice, and answer
or 'demur to the compla'nt in
said action, or the plaintiff will
apply to the Court for the relief
demanded in said complaint.
Jane, 1947.
WOLFE,
This the 9th day of Ji
J. LESTER WO_
Clerk of Superior Court
(9-12, 19, 26; 7-8-c)
State of North Carolina,
County of Mecklenburg.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
Ruby Arant Adams,1 Plaintiff, vs.
Clarence Thomas Adams,
Defendant.
Sendee of Sammons by Publication
The defendant above named will
take notice that an action entitled
as above has been commenced in
the Superior Court of Mecklen
burg County for the purpose of
obtaining an absolute divorce,
from the defendant on the grounds
of two years seperation.
And the defendant wll further
take notice that he is required to
appear before the Clerk of the
Superior Court of Mecklenburg
County, North Carolina, within
twenty days from the day of
which service by publication in
the cause is completed, qr within
twenty days from the tilth day
of July, 1947, and answer or de
murrer to the complaint filed in *
this action, or the plaintiff will
apply to the Court for the re
lief demanded in said complaint.
This the 19th day of June, 1947.
J. LESTER WOLFE,
Clerk of Superior Court.
(6-19, 26; 7-8, 10-c)
state oi Nortn Carolina, •
County of Mecklenburg.
IN THE SUPEBIOR COURT
Callie Varnam Warren, Plaintiff,
va. Albert F. Warren, Defendant.
Notice of Summons by Publication
The above named defendant will
take notice that an action as en
titled above has been commenced
in the Superior Court of Meck
lenburg County, North Carolina,
by\ the plaintiff to obtain an ab
solute divorce upon the‘grounds
of two years separation; and the
defendant will further take notice
that he is required to appear at
the office of the Clerk of the
Superior Court of Mecklenburg
County at the Court House in
Charlotte, North Carolina, within
twenty (20) days after the 31st
day of July, 1947, and answer or
demur to the complaint in said
action, or the plaintiff will apply
to the Court for the' relief de
manded in the said complaint.
This the 27th day of June, 1947.
J. LESTER WOLFE,
Clerk of the Superior Court.
(6-26; 7-3-10-17-24-c)
ADMINISTRATRIX’S NOTICE
Having qualified as Administra
trix of the Estate of Arthur Page
Drummond, deceased, late, of
Mecklenburg County. North Car
! olina, this is to notify all persons
having claims against the estate
of said deceased to exhibit them
to the undersigned at 915 West
Trade Street, Charlotte, North
Carolina, on or before the 3rd
day of July, 1948. or this notice
will be pleaded in bar of their
recovery. All persons indebted to
said estate will please make im
mediate payment.
This the 3rd day of July, 1947.
MRS. BESSIE L. DRUMMOND.
Administratrix of the Estate of
Arthur Page Drummond, 915
West Trade Street.
(7-3, 10, 17, 24-c)
North Carolina,
Mecklenburg Countv.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
H. M. Honeycutt and wife, Viney
Honeycutt. Plaintiffs, vs. Dewey
Odell Beedings. Defendant.
Notice of Service by Publication
The above named defendant,
Dewey Odell Beedings, will take
notice that an action entitled as
above has been commenced in the
Superior Court of Mecklenburg
County, North Carolina by the
plaintiffs for the recovery of a
life estate in the land described
in the complaint in the above en
titled action and to declare that
the said defendant hold said life
estate as trustee for the plaintiffs,
and the defendant will further
take notice that he is required
to appear at the office of the
Clerk of Superior Court of Meck
lenburg County at the Court
House in Charlotte. North Caro
lina within twenty (20) days after
the 31st day of July, 1947, which
date is at least seven days after
the last publication of this notice,
and answer or demur to the com
plaint in said action, or the plain
tiffs will apply to the Court for
the relief demanded in said com
plaint.
This the 28th day of June, 1947.
J. LESTER WOLFE,
Clerk of Superior Court.
(7-3, 10, 17. 24-c)
&
y°y
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