North Carolina Newspapers

    Editorial
CHARLOTTE LABOR JOURNAL & DIXIE FARM NEWS
Published Weekly at Charlotte. N. C.__
if A. Stall*. Editor end Publisher W. M. Witter, Associate Editor
Entered as second-class mail matter September 11, *1 the
Office at Charlotte, N. C., under the Act of Congress of March 3. 1»7»
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: *2.00 per year, payable in advance or
5c per copy.
ADVERTISING RATES for commercial advertising reasonable.
Official Organ of the Charlotte Central Labor Union and Approved by
The American Federation ot Labor and the
North Carolina Federation of Labor _
Address All Communications to Post Office Box 1061
Telephones 3-3094 and 4-5502
Office of Publication: 118 East Sixth Street. Charlotte. N. C.
The Labor Journal will not be responsible for opinions of corre
spondent*. but anv erroneous reflecting upon the character, standing or
mutation of any person, firm or corporation which may appear in
tfce columns of The Labor Journal will be gladlv corrected when called
to the attention of toe publisher. Correspondence and Open Forum
•pinions solicited.
TOBIN SCORES NEW LAW AND REPORTS
MEMBERSHIP GAIN
The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, the largest
AFL affiliate with a membership of 900,000, plunged into
a backlog of work at its convention in San Francisco last
week, the first held since* 1940.
Daniel J. Tobin, general president of the union for 41
years, delivered a ringing address to the opening session
in which he urged a sustained drive to repeal the Taft
Hartley law and a constant battle against the influence
and activities of Communist agents seeking to disrupt the
labor movement.
In his attack upon the Taft-Hartley law, Mr. Tobin
warned that although he had always opposed the general
strike, “because it is cruel to break contracts with 99 em
ployers to punish one employer,” he might be “compelled to
change” his views as a result of the new labor legislation.
“You can goad a man or a nation only so long,” he said.
“The teamsters have not one man on strike in the State
of California or in the nation. What I’m afraid of, and I m
not a pessimist, is that this new law will increase our
strikes. Men will not be chained to their posts when they
feel in their conscience they are justified in striking.
“I happen to have been fighting jurisdictional disputes
since the first day I came into office and I happen to know
you cannot settle jurisdictional disputes by law.”
Commenting upon the formation of a third political party
in sympathy with labor’s aims, Mr. Tobin said:
“There is no hope for a third party until this labor
movement in America is cemented into one organization.
In my personal judgment, 95 percent of the trade unionists
of America want one organization. Let me say that if
we had had one organization of labor, the Taft-Hartley Bill
would never have become law.”
Mr. Tobin charged some CIO leaders with efforts to block
AFL-CIO unity, although the AFL had made concessions
and reasonable offers in attempts to bring about organiza
tional unty between the two labor groups.
He charged Communist agents were “working night and
day to help destroy the labor movement of America and to
bring about strikes which cause discontent and hatred”
and “of laying the foundation for revolution.”
In his formal report to the convention Mr. Tobin re
ported a paid-up membership of “900,00 or better” and a
treasury or “around $17,000,000, compared with correspond
ing figures of 450,000 and 6,000,000 seven years ago. He
said the union had only scratched the surface in organizing
^workers within its jurisdiction.
In other convention actions a representative of trucking
employen advocated the formation of a country-wide labor
management committee to “combat the lawyers holiday
which is seemingly just ahead of us” as a result of the
Taft-Hartley law. Mr. Tobin abvised the employer repre
sentative, Mr. Philip A. Smith, president of the National
Conference of Local Cartage Operators, that his proposal
would receive serious consideration by the teamsters.
Joseph A. Padway, AFL General Counsel, presented an
analysis of the Taft-Hartley law and cautioned the team
sters against the belief that they could violate the law
“with impunity.” "If you do,” he warned, “you will be out
of business as a union. The anti-closed shop measures are
a tragic reality.”
A move on the part of the convention to increase Mr.
Tobin’s $30,000 salary was thwarted by Tobin himself when
he said he would not seek re-election if the increase were
put through.
COST OF LIVING SOARS AGAIN
Like the thermometer responding to a heat wave, the
cost of living soared again as the appetite of Big Business
for protits, and more profits, remained insatiable.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported the consumers’
price index for June 15th stood at 157.1 for a record high,
eclipsing the former level scored in March.
Retail prices of living essentials in mid-June were 18
percent higher than a year ago, and 59 per cent higher
than the August 1939 level.
It is doubly discouraging to wage earners to realize
that this record does not include increases likely to result
from the new rent control law foisted upon them by the
80th Congress. Nor does it reveal a true picture of the
situation today. Because of the time lag required for the
gathering of the material and analysis thereof prior to
publication, the price index does not reflect the rising
food and meat prices noticed especially during the last
month.
' What about profits? The answer may be found in the
magazine, ‘"fime” owned by a millionaire and itself a busi
ness institution. ,
“Time” was amazingly frank. It said the truth about
profits is stranger than fiction. Earnings of corporations,
it claimed, “had almost reached the realm of fable.”
On the basis of figures for the first six months of 1947,
corporations were “making $33,000 a minute,” the maga
zine pointed out During that period, aggregate profits
nun at an annual rate of $29 billion before taxes, up $8
billion over 1946, and of $17.4 billion after taxes, up 28
" per cent above 1946.
“Increases of 100 per cent to 300 per cent were not un
common;’ declared “Time.” '
MU» 3 mmum 5£S|Y
PMMCMT OP MAMMOTH...
Murt
at na« Km..
BMW t* JACK WLOK.
~ TO TIC CUM «TJ
in JOI
0*1 iraifN LOST NO TIMC IN
•tMTMt Ml* TISr. MOW WILL
a -u ty,■ KXUEB, REACT*
'factory workers paid
RELOW 65-CENT RATE
Washington, D. C.—More than
one million, or 8 per cent, of the
12 million workers employed in
manufacturing industries in Oc
tober, 1946, earned less than 65
I cents an hour, according to a re
; port issued by the Bureau of La*
| bor Statistics.
j Over half of ttiese were in the
lumber, furniture, tobacco, and
j apparel industries, which are im
| portant in the economy of the
South.
I Workers earning less than 75
cents an hour numbered 2,100,
000, including from 30 to 50 per
cent of the wage earners in the
lumber, furniture, tobacco, appar
| el, leather, and textile industry
groups.
Nearly three-fifths of the work
ers in manufacturing industries
earned $1 or more an hour, and
15 per cent were employed at
rates amounting to $1.50 or more.
The numbers of workers at the
lower rates have been reduced
substantially as a result of im
portant “second round” wage in
creases that have been granted
since the time the estimates were
prepared.
AFL1947
Convention
Calendar
(Following is a list of conven
tions scheduled for this year by
National and International- Un
ions and State Federations of La
bor under the banner of the
American Federation of Labor.
| This list is not( complete. Addi
tion will be announced later.)
Sept. 8—Amal. Ass'n Street and
Electric Ry.—Los Angeles.
Sept. 8—International Chemical
Workers—Washington, D. C.
Sept. 8—Nebraska State Fed
eration of Labor—Hastings.
Sept. 8—Kentucky State Feder
ation of Labor—Bowling Green.
Sept. 9—Connecticut State Fed
eration of Labor—Undecided.
feept. 9—United Ass’n Plum
bers and Steamfitters—Undecided.
Sept. 15—Ohio State Federation
of Labor—Cincinnati.
Sept. 15—Int. Bro. Pulp, Sul
phite and Paper Mill Wks.—Mil
waukee.
THE OLD STANDBY
Ml YOU KNOW SO MUCH
MOOT, THEY ROOT WEAR OUT
They just last on
on. This choir
vary thing for Sunooy
School rooms,
[\| porch, kitchon
where o r o u i
house that o
l V
•N
i • khM.
Wo, bought
too ffiony
ond thoy
novo
V $1.39..
will mere 41 the price we eve offering them
H»l» week. Cmm early end get you 6 or 12 er
•uaf ham maajI
|wa w nvi jwv nwi«
STERCHI’S EXCHANGE STORE
At Any Strreki Store in the Carolina*
129 SooHi CoNoge 425 S. Tryo* St. Nnm 1-1751
Sept. 16—•Minnesota State Fed
eraton of Labor—Hibbing.
Sept. 16—Brotherhood Railroad
Trainmen—Miami Beach, Fla.
Sept. 20—New Hampshire State
Federation of Labor—Concord.
Sept. 20—American Wire Weav
ers Protective Assn’--New York
City.
Sept.—Mssissippi State Federa
tion of Labor—Jackson.
Sept. 22—Illinois State Feder
ation of Labor—Peoria.
Sept. 11—Oklahoma State Fed
eration of Labor—McAlester.
Sept. 11—Arirona State Fed
eration of labor—Tucson.
Sept. 12 — Int. Union Wood,
Wire and Metal Lathers — Los
Angles.
Sept. 25—-West Virginia State
Federation of Labor—Charleston.
Sept. 29 — Metal Trades De
partment—San Francisco.
Oct. 1—Building and Construc
tion Trades Dept.—San Francisco.
Oct. 2—New Mexico State Fed
eration of Labor—Carlsbad.
Oct. 3 — Union Label Trades
Department—San Francisco.
•Oct.—Railway Mail Associa
tion—Jacksonville, Fla.
Oct. 6—International Asbestos
W orkers—U ndecided.
Oct. 20—Commercial Telegraph
ers Union—Los Angeles.
Nov. 17—International Auto
mobile Workers—Milwaukee.
Dec. 6—International Bill Pott
ers—Chicago.
•Date not definitely set.
Send in your subscription to the
Labor Journal today!
“Did "TfoU 'fyout
'/Way 7 a
hum* waim i* an aia 10
better health. becauM tta htf h
content of mayneatum and eal>
clum ~~ramliteraliies tho body
tor vltafenerfy Free to un la
wmm
natural. Caao of U qte_ (Ut,
delivered to your home. Alio in
bjjiaUM'dendJoha for um la
TELEPHONE 2-102*
ae write te 9. O. Son
» Cbartette. E C.
MIDAS WATKR
Only at Oh
Warlitxar Spmatta Piaaot
—ComwiMt Tana«—
PARKERGARDNER CO.
8iaea 1889
lit W. Trata Pkoaa 8X87
FOREMOST PASTEURIZED MILK
Farm Fresh Milk—Foremost Ice Cream .
Foremost Farms, Inc.
PHONES 7116 — 7117
ALLEN
OVERALL CO.
MANUFACTURERS OF
OVERALLS, ONE PIECE SUITS AND WORK PANTS
415 S. Church St. Phone 3-3598
CHARLOTTE, N. C.
IJfs jtbe Quality of leadership
that makes Ltddtrs' || f
A Bird You Want To Know
Proudly we present the C8
ROOSTER . the new emblem of
Colonial Stores.
The CS Rooster i* a new way
of identifying Big Star and Little
Star Stores, and above all — A
MARK OF QUALITY FOODS.
Join the thousands shopping
under the sign of the CS ROOST*
ER today —you’ll be glad that
you did!
COLONIAL STORES
IN CORPORA TBD
Martin’s Department Store
RELIABLE MERCHANDISE ALWAYS
AT LOW PRICES
Shop at VflaJdin and Sodm
SHOES-CLOTHING—FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
AT CORNER TRADE AND COLLEGE
    

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