North Carolina Newspapers

    Editorial
CHARLOTTE LABOR JOURNAL ft DIXIE FARM NEWS
Published Weekly at Charlotte, N. C. _
ft. A. Stalls, Editor and Publisher W. M. Witter, Associate Editor
Entered as secono-class mail matter September II, 1981, at the Post
Office at Charlotte, N. C., under the Act of Congress of March 8,1879
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $2.00 per year, payable in advance or
5c per copy.
ADVERTISING RATES for commercial advertising reasonable.
Official Organ of the Charlotte Central Labor Union and Approved by
The American Federation of Labor and the
North Carolina Federation of Labor___
Address All Communications to Post Office Box 1061
Telephones 8-3094 and 4-6502 . „
Office of Publication: 118 East Sixth Street, Charlotte, N. C.
ITU PRESIDENT DENOUNCES NLRB SUIT
Woodruff Ranolph, president of the International Typo
graphical Union, denounced the action of the general coun
sel for the National Labor Relations Board in filing a com
plaint against the union and its local in Baltimore, alleging
refusal to bargain on the part of the union.
The complaint challenged the “no-contract” policy
adopted by the Typographical Union. It accused the union
of refusing “to bargain collectively in good faith with' the
Graphic Arts League, an employer organization.
‘The Baltimore Typographical Union did not refuse to
bargain on anything,” Mr. Randolph said, “and was ex
pecting more meetings when the conspirators against the
ITU took over.”
“The Baltimore union did not break off negotiations and
and even today, before the expiration of the current agree
ment, is available for further negotiations with a view to
coming to a conclusion with satisfactory arrangements.
“Having made it impossible for trade unions to use the
National Labor Relations Board, Mr. Denham, by the pre
cipitate issuance of this complaint in this case, makes it
abundantly clear how one-sided both the Taft-Hartley act
and his enforcements of it are.
“Contrary to the invariable practice of the board, no ef-(
forts whatever have been made to settle this case on an 1
amicable basis. The complaint was served on us without
warning, without adequate investigation and without ex
ploring a possibility of reaching an agreement.
Mr. Randolph referred to a meeting scheduled with the
American Newspaper Publishers’ Association as an attempt
on the part of the union and the industry to adjust any
outstanding differences through “genuine collective bar
gaining.” He said:
“Despite Mr. Denham’s interference, this will continue
to be our policy. I am persuaded that when all the facts
are brought out, our position will be found to be in full
compliance with the law.”
NLRB GIVES UNIONS UNTIL OCTOBER 31 TO
D*flfrRlBt)TE DATA
Robert N. Denham, general counsel for the National La
bor Relations Board, announced the grant of another time
extension to unions in order that they might comply with
the requirements of the Taft-Hartley law concerning filing
and distribution of their financial reports.
Unions now have until October 31 to satisfy the NLRB
that they have circulated financial statements among their
members, as required by law.
Another requirement is that unions file their financial
statements and other data about their organizations with
the Labor Department in order to qualify before the NLRB.
The postponement of the deadline or filing of financial
data is the second such time extension granted by the
NLRB’s general counsel’s office. Following the action of
the AFL Executive Council and in response/ to requests of
various unions, the general counsel moved ahead the date
originally set for the filing of non-Communist affidavits by
all unions officers. *
As things stand now, October 31 is the date on which
both non-Communist affidavits and financial data must be
filed in order to satisfy thq NLRB. The double postpone
ment saved nearly 5,000 cases pending before the board
from dismissal.
NATION’S FOOD BILL TO HIT $35 BILLION
The nation’s food bill for 1947 will take $35 billion out
of consumers’ incomes, the Bureau of Agricultural Eco
nomics estimated.
Soaring food prices are expected to push the grocery
bills of American citizens nearly $6 billion above the 29.1
billion spent last year.
The estimated total for food purchases this yewr is 2^
times the average spent in the prewar years 1935-39. At
the bottom of the depression the nation spent only a third
of thid year’s estimate for food. In the inflation of 1920.
following World War I, food cost the country $17.4 billion,
just half what's expected to be spent for eating this year.
According to latest official figures, meat prices are up
130 per cent from mid-1939. dairy products prices up 92
per cent, fruit and vegetable prices up 118 per cent. These
increases are based upon price jumps occurring through
July. Further sharp gains have been scored in prices of
food since then.
- =
Last Polio Health Hint:
Avoid Sudden Chilling!
Sadden chilling each a
ptnagtag late call water aa i
vary hat day ahaald ha avaida
aa tha^dxth^aad^IhuU healtl
Nattanal Fowndatfon tor Infan
tile Paralyria cantinas threat I
its laeal chapter.
SelesUSe research ftaancn
hy March el Dimes fands ha
shewn that when la he rater
animals expcsed to the poll
virus were sunaeniy rtuned.
twice as many developed acute and paralysing attacks of the
disease as did a centre! group which had been protected from
sadden temperature changes.
Therefore, take no chances. To be on the safe side avoid
sudden chilling, the National Foundation advises.
(Su Mr SCHACHH[R
.TW/f/ J
MINTONE) TMI WOOD
oOC WOQKSH
.UftTKNt it...
JOC WOWR1
AUMADV *0 OMOIMO0.
BUT m*T OCX* MONA MANT
wrrw mm?
LABOR BACKS CAMPAIGN FOR COMMUNITY CHESTS
Organized labor, through AFL President William Green,
gave its and his personal and official endorsement to the
1947 campaign to raise funds for the Community Chests
of America.
Mr. Green, appointed a vice-chairman of the organiza
tion, said in a letter to H. J. Heinz, 11, chairman of the
Community Chests of America:
“Thousands of members of the American Federation of
Labor in every part of the United States are taking prom
inent positions in the activities of their local Community
Chests and Councils.
“As you know, this participation on the part of our
membership was responsible in large degree in making
successful the campaigns of the Community War Chests.
I am deeply convinced that this co-operation with thei*
fellow Americans of all walks of life should be maintained
during the peacetime era through the full participation of
all citizens in local Community* Chest operations.
“1 and the members of the American Federation of La
bor are well aware of, the many fine services rendered to
our citizens by the Community Chest supported Red Feath
er Agencies.
“Because of my deep interest in Community Chests and
in the promotion of the humanitarian services rendered by
tfcem, I give^ny personal and official endorsement to thd
1947 Community Chest campaigns.”
^XrrcrEvtRr 22
UVIMG PERSONSpWE
wiasPFwop\f?roF
HIS LIFE in AMEWTAt
IMSTI1UTIOI.
e famous BAujn a ^otuiwn m i»io
IN VIRGINIA DEVELOPED LARGELYH20M a
SERIES OF WHITE. SERVANT STRIKES,
WHICH LOCAL JUSTICES HAD ATTEMPTED
TO SUPPRESS.
^SAI
S A RESULT OF
2 WORLD WASH. THE
r UNITED STATES HAS
MORE SHIP- BUILOlHO
caBactty thaw all
THE REST OF the
WORLD.
A tMONHCAD DESERVES A UNION l
be Sure ychjr. hat *s vnioh
maM , INSIST ON THIS LABEL—►
“KNOW THE ICE CREAM YOU EAT*
OUR PLEDGE OF QUALITY ON EACH PACKAGE
I Mi I
IC h' CfC k A V
“» health food"
PET DAIRY PRODUCTS CORP.
W.T ■ * i ifc -
W HvliVMr #pM9T«V r iOHO®
PARKER-GARDNER CO.
im
118 W. Trad* Pfc«» 888?
0&lc{ tyou ">ri<X<~‘-€ ‘Tfout
J/fcHCKZtj *7idatf ?
START
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S)UAM+U.
HOW
THE COMMERCIAL
NATIONAL BANK
Charlotte, N. C.
L ^
De VONDE
Synthetic Cleaners. Dyer*
Hatters, Furriers
Seven Points Why We Are One
of the South’s Leading
Synthetic Cleaners
1. Restores original freshness
and sparkle.
2. Removes carefully all dirt,
dust and grease.
S. Harmless to the giost deli
cate of fabrics.
4. Odorless, thorough cleaning
5. Garments stay clean longer.
6. Press retained longer.
7. Reduces wardrobe upkeep.
Dc VONDE
Call 3-5125 121 W. 6th St.
It Pavu To Trade Wltfc
BOGGETT
LUMBER CO.
311 B. Park Ave. Phone 817t
I
FOREMOST PASTEURIZED MILK
Fam Fresh Milk—Foremost Ice Creaai
Foremost Farms, Inc.
PHONES 7116 — 7117
ALLEN
OVERALL CO.
MANUFACTURERS OP
OVERALLS, ONE PIECR S^ITS AND WORK PANTS
415 S. Church St. phone 3-3598
I CHARLOTTE. N. C.
_
A Bird You Want To Know
Proudly we preseat the C8
ROOSTER - the aew emblem of
Colonial Stores.
The CS Rooster U a aew way
of identifying Big Star and Little
Star Stores, and above all — A
mark of quality foods.
Join the thousands shopping
under the siga of the CS ROOST*
ER today —you'll be glad that
you did!
COLONIAL STORES
INCORPORATED
Martin’s Department Store
RELIABLE MERCHANDISE ALWAYS
AT LOW PRICES
Shop aJt Wla/din and Soon
SHOES—CLOTHING—FOR THE ENTIRE FAME.'
AT CORNER TRADE AND COLLEGE
t
    

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