North Carolina Newspapers

    METAL TRADES CONVENTION
(Continued From Page 1)
that a problem has been forced
upon ug which cannot be adjusted
through compromise asd appease*
ment. It is an effort, organiser1
under a dictatorship, to force free
men throughout the world to sur*
render their liberties and their
representative form of government
to control- by dictators.
■“What sacrifi&s we may be
forced to make to maintain the
freedom we now possess, time
alone will demonstrate, but there
can be no question as to where
Americans will stand on the ques*
tion of defending their own frea
institutions, and giving assistance
to other countries whose free in
stitutions are being menaced by
those whose every activity is con
trolled by dictators.
“The beginning of self-govera
ment and free' institutions having)
their origin among the people of
orth-western Europe, many cen
urie* ago, and which came to
>11 flower in our country, have
riven to mankind the most) prec
us possession they could have—
th status of free men. This her
itage must not be sacrificed re
gardless of what cost the’ effort
may equire.”
Mr. Frey also declared that the
Communist question is a thorn
in the side of those charged with
the task of attempting an amal
gamation of the AFL and tne
CIO. He deplored the success
of the Communists in retaining
their influence in some CIO un
ions and asserted that such in
fluence must be effectively nulli
fied before any real merger can
be achieved between the two labor
organizations.
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FEDERAL MEDIATION
SERVICE ADOPTS k
“HANDS-OFF” POLICY
Washington, D. C.—Cyras S.
Ching, director of the new Federal:
Mediation and Conciliation Service
created by the Taft-Hartley law,
announced the service would fol
low a "hands-off" policy when
ever possible in labor disputes
arising froyn contract termination
of collective bargaining contracts.
Mr. Ching said the service j
would put major emphasis on {
keeping out of as many industrial
disputes as it can. Major dis
putes affecting interstate com
merce will get first attention, he
declared.
Ching gaid selection and screen
ing of disputes which the service ;
will enter is necessary because ofj
the “great case-load burden”
placed on it by the Taft-Hartley
Act.
The law requires that wherever
a dispute arises over a new con
tract or renewal of an old one
in an industry affecting inter
state commerce the Mediation
Service shall be notified 30 days
in advance of a threatened strike
or lockout. Labor officials said
this would apply to 500,000 firms
and 15,000,000 members of organ-1
ited labor—the same groups cov-j
ered by the Federal Wage-Hour!
and Labor Relations Act.
Ching said he would shortly is
sue a form to be used by com
panies and unions in notifying sthe
service of disputes involving
modification or termination of ex
isting agreements.
“This form will elicit informa
ton which will assist the service
in determining whether in a par
ticular case it has statutory legal
authority to intercede and whether
such intercession will be in ac
cordance with the principles and
policies expressed in this state
ment,” Ching said.
“The co-operation of all em
ployers and unions is earnestly
solicited in the employment of
these forms as soon as they are
made available at the offices of
the service, international union
and employer associations.”
Ching reminded employers and
unions that the Taft-Hartley Act
“makes it a statutory duty . . .
to participate fully and promptly
in conciliation and mediation
meetings called by the service."
He said he would follow these
general rules:
1. Employers and unions will
be encouraged to resolve indus
trial differences by themselves.
2. Labor disputes, primarily lo
ral and having but a minor ef
fect on ' interstate commerce,
thould be conciliated and mediat
ed, if need be, by agencies of
itate pr local government.
3. The test of whether the Fed
eral service intercedes shall be
'whether such a significant in
terruption* of commerce is threat
ened by the dispute as clearly
:o require Federal intercession to
protect the interest of the Federal
jovemment."
4. The service will refrain from
nterceding in grievance disputes
(rising over the application or in
terpretation of an existing col
ective bargaining agreement, ex
cept for unusual cases.
5. The service will suggest that
the parties agree to submit the
smployer’s last offer of settlement
to a secret ballot of the employes
when other means of settlement
las failed.
1.112 LABOR GROUPS
FILE REQUIRED DATA
Washington—The Labor Depart
ment reported that 1,112 labor
organizations, local and interna
tional, had filed financial reports
and other information required
jnder the Taft-Hartlej^ law.
The total is only a small part
of the 50.000 to 75,000 union/ or
ganization existing throughout
the country.
Under the new labor law, un
ions must file this data with the
Labor Department—and affidavits
that their officials are non-Com
munist with the National Labor
Relations Board—in order to be
come eligible to use the NLRB’s
facilities,
William L. Connolly, director
of the department’s Fair Labor
Standards Division, said many in
ternational unions had requested
forms for distribution to their
locals.
Most unions belonging to the
American Federation of Labor
and Congress of Industrial Or
ganizations are delaying action.
Support your Labor paper—pa
tronize Journal Advertisers.
LIST OF STATE MEDIATION
AGENCIES NOW AVAILABLE
Washington, D. C. — The De
partment of Labor announced the
availability of a compilation of
mediation and conciliation author
ities set up in 37 states and 3 ter
ritories.
The list, compiled by the Di
vision of Labor Standards, is de
signed to guide unions and man* (
agement in meeting requirements
of the Taft-Hartley law to notify
state mediation agencies simul
taneously with the Federal Medi
ation and Conciliation Service of
disputes over the termination or
modification of collective bargain
ing contracts.
TIFT ADMITS EMPLOYERS
COULD BE “RED”; WUIN6
TO REQUIRE OATH OF THEM
Portland, Ore. — Even Senator
Robert A. Taft admits his Taft
Hartley Act has flaws and should
be changed. t
He came up here with a sugges
tion that corporation officers
should be required to take the
same non-Communist oah that is
required of union leaders before
they can b^ing cases before the
National Labor Relations Board.
The Senator did not reveal,
however, whether he favored such
affidavits by all officers of ail
employers’ organizations, such as
the National Association of Man
ufacturers and the United States
Chamber of Commerce.
The fact that employers are
under no compulsion to sign non
Communist affidavits probably was
an oversight of Congress when it
was writing the law. he remarked.
And he would have no objection
to an amendment of the Taft
Hartley Act which would put them
on the same footing with labor in
this respect, he said.
“I guess it din’t occur to anyone
in Congress that employer or
ganisations might be fronting for
the Communists,” he explained,
"but as far ag I am concerned
the law might as well apply to
all who have business with the
labor board.” % • '
The Ohio Senator expressed the
view in the matter in response to
questions at a press conference.
CRUIK8HANK APPOINTED
TO U. 8. HOSPITAL COUNCIL
Washington, D. C. — Nelson
Cruikshank, the AFL’s director
of social insurance activities, has
been appointed to the Federal
Hospital Council, established, last
year to help administer the Gov
ernment’s hospital survey and
construction program.
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