North Carolina Newspapers

    Editorial
__Z_
CHARLOTTE LABOR JOURNAL & DIXIE FARM NEWS j
Published Weekly at Charlotte, N. C._.
H. A. Stalls. Editor and Publisher W. M. Witter, Associate Editor
Entered as second-class mail matter September 11, 1931, at the Foot ;
Office at Charlotte, N. C., under the Act of Congress of March 3, 18.9
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 12.00 per yearr, payable in advance or
5c per copy. .,
ADVERTISING RATES for commercial advertising reasonable.
Official Organ of the Charlotte Central Labor Union and Approved by
The American Federation of Labor and the
North Carolina Federation of Labor _j
Address All Communication^ to Post Office Bo* 10C1
Telephones 3-3094 and 4-6502
Office of Publication: 118 East Sixth Street. Charlotte, N. C.
The Labor Journal will not be responsible for opinions of corre
spondents, but any erroneous reflecting upon the character, standing ot
reputation of any person, Arm or corporation which may appear in
the columns of The Labor Journal will be gladly corrected when called
to the attention of toe publisher. Correspondence and Open Forum
opinions solicited. * ___
CLARK CHARGES RUSSIA BLOCKED AUSTRIAN
PEACE
General Mark W. Clark, former wartime commander of
the Fifth Army while engaged in the Italian campaign,
and now Sixth Army commander, charged that Soviet
Russia has blocked every constructive attempt by the
United States to aid in the rehabilitation of Europe and
in the promotion of world peace.
General Clark, speaking before the AFL convention ir.
San Francisco, related his experiences as United States
High Commissioner on the Allied Council charged with
responsibility for the administration of occupied Austria
He praised the record of American labor for the backing
given our military forces in terms -of munitions furnished
the fighting men at the height of the “difficult” Italian
campaign and for the way in which labor responded to
the needs of the democratic labor groups faced with food
shortages in post war Europe.
Citing the absence of the co-operation which existed in
wartime between the United States and Russia, General
Claik said that is “the reason we have been unsuccessful
in making any progress to speak of in establishing the
peace we fought so hard to win.”
“You know it is in confused areas where people are
hungry and helpless and where the destruction of war is
prevalent that you find the best breeding ground for Com
munism. They do not want any return to normalcy, be
cause through upset conditions, they have the best chance
to force the people to embrace the Communist way of life.”
General Clark said the chief issues over which disagree
ment was rife in Austria were food, reparations, and the
problem of the displaced persons. Of these, food was the
main problem, he asserted, especially in the areas of
Austria dependent upon other sections of the country for
their food supply.
“The real issue in Austria, as ! tell you, is food. Most
of the food is controlled by the Soviet, and contrvy to
their agreement they did not permit distribution of that"
food as they should have all through Austria. They sub
sisted the Red Army off the land contrary to their pledge.
Hence, there was a great shortage of food in the country
and it was necessary, for our country to rise to the oc
casion, as it has ever since, and for the past two years
they have lived barely above a starvation diet. They have
been getting between 1200 and 1500 calories, so you know
what a great boon it was when this country began send
ing and is continuing to send food parcels to those dis
gruntled people.”
CONVENTION VOTES ORGANIZING DRIVE
The AFL convention in session in San Francisco, voted
an intensive organizing campaign to combat the Taft-Hart
ley law and other anti-labor legislation.
By unanimous vote the delegates to the convention
called for a stepping up of the AFL’s organizing campaign
in the Southland for the ultimate extension of such a drive
to the whole nation.
This action came with the approval of a report sub
mitted to the convention by the Committee on Organiza
tion which outlined the progress made during the past
year and recommended, steps to be taken to strengthen
the AFL’s organizing activities
In the face of anti-labor legislation and despite numerous
CIO raiding attempts, the report revealed that “exception
ally effective organizing activities" were carried on during
the past year. The report said:
“The intelligent, capable leadership within the AFL has
strengthened the position of the American Federation of
Labor in the eyes of the public.
“The advances made by the AFL in the establishment
of proper human relationships regardless of race, creed,
color, or national origin have won the labor movement
many friends, particularly in the South.”
The report declared the organization of teachers merits
special attention by the entire labor movement and said
the recent membership gains scored by the American Fed
eration of Teachers “will have great significance in com
bating the spread of anti-labor propaganda.”
The committee report urged every international union
to take a serious interest in organizing the teachers of
America as a means of obtaining a “fair hearing” for
labor in the public schools.
In regard to future plans for AFL organizing activities,
the report said:
“Your Committee on‘Organization urges that the Ex
ecutive Council formulate plans to protect the fine gains
made and to inaugurate an intensive nationwide member
ship campaign similar to the southern drive at the earliest
possible moment.
SDw IPMIN
KNOCKEO EUTCH DOWN,
BUT MORTON SATES MAS
0*01 RIO MS CONDOR
fliiifl to attack
UMON
i
HONOR IS BESTOWED ON PRESIDENT GREEN
AFL Pjresident William Gieen received an honor when
he was awarded a bronze plaque in recognition of his
valiant service in defense of the rights and dignity of the
common man irrespective of race, color, creed, or national
origin.
Presentation of the plaque was made at the AFL con
vention in San Francisco by four agencies representing
various creeds and races. They are the Catholic Inter
racial Council, the Jewish Labor Committee, the Negro
Labor Committee, and the Presbyterian Institute of In
dustrial Relations.
The plaque was presented by A. Philip Randolph, presi
dent of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, on be
half of the four organizations. In making the presenta
tion, Mr. Randolph praised Mr. Green for his fight against
religious bigotry, intolerance, and race hatreds which he
said; “is the fight to preserve democracy at home and
give authority and integrity to our foreign policy around
the world ”
Mr. Charles S. Zimmerman, vice-president of the In
ternational Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union and a 'Vice
president of the Jewish Labor Committee, also spoke in
praise of Mr. Green.
In the course of his talk, Mr. Zimmerman described the
venerable AFL president as a man “whose very being rep
resents the cause for which we are fighting, the causs
of labor, the cause of tolerance, and the cause of brother
hood and solidarity.”
Commenting upon the co-operation shown by the AFL
in conjunction with the activities of the Jewish Labor
Committee, Mr. Zimmerman said that a good share of the
credit for any accomplishments in the fight against in
tolerance must go to the men and women of labor.
The text of the inscription on the plaque presented to
Mr. Green hailed him as a “bold an stalwart warrior
against the foulness of bigotry and the corruptness of
intolerance” and a “pillar of strength in the endless cru
sade for freedom of conscience, the dignity of man and the
human rig^rts of_.aH peoples everywhere."
THE MARCH OF LABOR
0H94O- OFTMEUS.
fWHxATlOW OVER t*46A3t
OF 6S> - 9 MILLION-A
LITTLE MORE THAN Z
MILLION WERE EMplOytP.
$j9@<^©d&
AM&ftlCAAf CHILDREN
66-fWBgN 6 AdO 15 Do
NOT ATTEND SCHOOL.
was****
1
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297
(RfATORSOF
109 SOUTH TRYON*l?a NORTH TRYON
'll*._-/. '■7. V-.. 7
START
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