North Carolina Newspapers

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See these beautiful, useful, full-length Nurre plate glass door
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MORNINGS GETTING
\
\
CHILLY?
Vet days ore os worm as midsummer . . .
so you shiver through the morning chill
rather thon waste fuel, or hove your
house too worm later in the day.
Neither is necessary. An electric heater
is the perfec^bnswer to chilly mornings.
By simply and quickly plugging in your
heater you cari have a warm bathroom,
a glowing breakfast nook, or a cozy cor
ner for bathing baby.
Spot y»r heat where you need it. the
clean convenient way, at the coat of a few
pennies a day!
DUKt> POWER COMPANY
REPORT PRJUSES |
GARMENT UNIONS
Washington, D. C.—Strikes in |
the clothing industry “have been j
all but eliminated” through la* |
bor-management co-operation, ac
cording to a report released by1
the Brookings Institution^
Dr. Kurt Braun, of the staff
of the Private Research Corpor
ation, reporting on a study of the
industry, said that he growth of
union - management co-operation
has been one of the significant
'abor relations developments of
the time.”
Dr. Braun said that unions in
he industry “have obtained the
ight to participate in the mak
ng of many decisions , formerly
eserved to management- "In re
turn, he said, “they have re
nounced unlimited freedom of ac
tion but still may strike if ne
gotiations for new agreements
fail.”
“Increased efficiency and good
will of workers have tended to
leconcile management in some de
gree to the relinquishment of
some of its authority to the un
ion.” he reported.
One of the biggest unions in
the field,' is the AFL’s Interna
tional Ladies Garment Workers.
COUNCIL RENEWS OFFER
TO MEET WITH THE CIO
(Continue* From Page 1)
ganic unity and work out the de- ;
tails.
“To our surprise? the presidents
of the CIO stated in a communica
tion dated July 31, that thig in
terpretation of the declaration
unanimously adoped by the com
mittee representing the Ameri
can Federation of Labor and the
committee representing the CIO
was all wrong.
“A simple reading of the declara
tion unanimously adopted at the
meeting of the representatives of
the American Federation of Labor
and the CIO will show that it is
in no way susceptible of the in
terpretation placed upon it by the j
president of the CIO. The dec- j
laration specifically and simply
stipulates that we, the represen
tatives of the American Federa
tion of Labor and of the CIO,
are of the unanimous opinion that
organic unity should be estab
lished within the American ‘abor
movement! furthermore, that we
are firmly convinced (hat the ec
onomic, social and industrial in
terests of labor can be best served
through the establishment of a
united labor movement. Then the
statement further provides that,
having made hig commitment, it
now becomes our duty to lay a
sound foundation upon which a
superstructure of organic unity
:an be erected.”
U. 8. FARM EMPLOYMENT UP
Washington, D. C.—Total farm
employment in the United States
September 1 rose to 11,132,000,
which was 21,000 above a year
sgo. the Agriculture Department
reported.
Of the total, 2,873,000 were
hired workers, 96,000 more than
September 1 last year. The num
ber of family farm workers de
cline 76.000 to 8.269,000.
The department said supplies
at seasonal labor generally were
adequate to handle all work on
time during the current harvest
season. August, which generally
shows a slight increase in farm
employment, this, year had a de
crease of 8,000 workers.
BOARD'S 4-TO-l DECISION
FLATLY REVERSES EDICT
(Continued From Page 1)
officers of the AFL had not done
so.
Daniel W. Tracy, president of
tl»e 1BEW, then tiled a petition
with the Regional Director re
questing him to proceed .with the
election, and subsequently filed a
petition requesting the Regional
Director either to dismiss the pe
tition for certificaton or proceed
with the election.
Upon the denial of these peti
tions. Mr. Tracy appealed the
Regional Director’s ruling to the
National tabor Relations Board.
He charged that Mr. Denham's
ruling which was the basis of
the Regional Director's action
was a “farfetched legal inter
pretation . . . which will prove
ruinous, if unchanged, to labor
management relations."
NEW CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT IS PASSED
(Continued From page 1)
bier to take a last view of the
remains. To many of the dele
gates Mr. Padway had been more
than a lawyer and associate. In
fact a life-long friend. His sudden
passing deeply saddened the con
vention’s deliberations.
Earlier the news from Wash
ington that the National Labor
Relation's Board had overruled
the Denham regulation on the
filing of non-Communist affida
vits was widely hailed as a vic
ory for the the AFL’s position.
JUDGE PADWAY
(Continued From Page 1)
tion consisted of a severe indict
ment of the Taft-Hartley Act
which, he charged, trampled on
the constitutional rights of the
nation’s workers-He_.said:
"By the Taft-Hartley Act,
‘government by injunction’ has
been reestablished with a ven
geance never dreamed of or prac
ticed before.
“By this law, the National La
bor Relations Act’s guarantees
of the right to organise and to
be free from employer domination
are removed or so diluted as to
be practically worthless to work
ers and their unions; this is ac
complished by including in the
act a code of unfair labor prac
tices which may be charged to
unions and thereby weaken and
destroy them.
“By this act, damage suits
against unions are encouraged,
and the procedure for bringing
them are facilitated so as! to in
vade or destroy union treasuries
by these judgements.
“By this act,’ the right to bar
gain for the closed shop or to
bargain for welfare benefits, as
well as other well-established
conditions, is made illegal and.
in some instances, mad** criminal
conduct.
By this act, tne union cnecs
off ia turned into a problem with
many difficulties.
‘ “Under this law, political ex
penditures are prohibited to the
point of outright denial of con
stitutional rights.
“By this law the internal af
fairs of labor unions, to quite a
degree, are taken over by the
government; in fact, the govern
ment has undertaken to pass up
on the reasonableness of union
initiation fees, and to deny to
foremen and supervisors the stat
us of employes so they cannot
have the protection the act may
afford to other employes.
“This act imposes procedures
which will keep unions in con
stant litigation and in unlimted
elections, all for the purpose of
destroying union morale and to
make it difficult for an organi
sation representing workers to
exist.
“It is for that reason I say
that our approach to labor prob
lems and our thinking respecting
them must entirely change from
the past." ,
i
SHORT COPY IS
• If you always want the correct time, get a guaranteed watch at Kay’s
• Per your furniture needs, Lowder lead*
• The Biltmore 'bottle top means tops in quality
• The Charlotte Observer leads two to one in circulation
• There’s a Southern Five and Ten near your home
• Mail-Me-Monday is America’s most talked-about service
• Call Collins . . . 3-9406 . . . for your second mortgage
• If you're looking for a better place to eat, you’ll like Kuester’s
• Artist’s supplies cost less at Duncan Printraaker.?
• Call 3-0027 for your favorite beverages delivered to your door
• Nelson Page ... a name honored in diamonds ... brings you the time
• For your favorite beverages delivered ice cold, call Home Delivery
• Visit the new Hahn Bakery in the heart of the Plaza section
• Call Charlotte Poultry for the finest Break poultry
• Call 3-2988 to reserve your new frozen food locker
(Tfiis t» • partial list of mnuftt now bon* transmitted oa Time Service)
FOR FIFTEEN YEARS CHARLOTTE’S TIMEKEEPER
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H. A. STALLS PRINTING CO.
P. O. Box 1061 118 East 6th Street
Charlotte, North Carolina
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