North Carolina Newspapers

    Editorial
charlotte Tabor journal & dixie earm news
Published Weekly at Charlotte. N. C.
H. A, Stalls, Editor and Publisher W. M. Witter, A—ociate Editor
Entered as second-class mail matter September 11, 1981, at the Poet
Office at Charlotte, N. C., under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879
"SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 12.00 per year, payable in advance or
lie per copy.
ADVERTISING RATES for commercial advertising reasonable.
Official Organ of the Charlotte Central Labor Union and Approved by
The American Federation of Labor and the
North Carolina Federation of Labor
Address All Communications to Post Office Box 1061
Telephones 3-3094 and 4-5602
Office of Publication: 118 East Sixth Street. Charlotte, N. C.
The Labor Journal will not be responsible for opinions of corre
spondents, but any erroneous reflecting upon the character, standing oi
reputation of any person, firm or co.*poration which may appear in
the columns of The Labor Journal will be gladly corrected when called
to the attention of toe publisher. Correspondence and Open Forum
spinions solicited. __ _
FARMERS' 6R0SS INCOME IN 1946 SHOWS 200 PCT. 6MN
Income received by farmers in
194« *as 208 per cent greater
than the average for the yeara
1935-1939 and the value of assets
held by farmers doubled since
1940, according to a report is
sued by the Agriculture Depart
ment economists.
The nation’s farmers received a
record $24,500,000,000 for last
year's crops and started 1947 with
assets worth $111,209,000,000.
The economists’ report, based
on revised figures, pointed out
that most of the increase in
farmers’ gross earnings resulted
from still-booming prices that
have, fchot up their income still
further during the first eight
months of this year.
Despite the record take last
year, the report said, farmers
went further into debt. The total
of crop loans increased from $$
119,000,000 to $3,524,000,000 dur
ing the year and mortgages on
farms climbed 600 million dollars
to a year-end total of $4,890,000,
000.
In this connection, the Federal
Reserve System reported that in
sure! commercial banks alone had
'2,200,000,000 outstanding: in mort
gage and short-term farm pro
duction loans as of last June 30.
The agriculture experts said
that farmers’ cash earnings last
year were “the largest in a con
tinually increasing series which
started in 1939 and apparently
has not yet reached its climax."
“This long uptrend in farm in
come," they said, ’stemmed from
the strong wartime and postwar
demand for all farm products, and
from increased production. Price
increases have played a major
part in the gainst ’
An official Agriculture Depart
ment report showed recently that
farmers were doing even better
this year. It said the average
farmer was taking in more dol
lars than ever before and that
net receipts during the first eight
months of 1947 totaled $17,400,
000,000.
Cl UNEMPLOYMENT PAY
TOPS $2.5 BILLION MARK
Washington. D. C.—The Vet
erans Administration announced
that over $2 Vi billion has been
paid t<r veteran^ * in (unemploy
ment or self-employment allow
ances since* the fall of 1944.
However, only half of the na
tion's 14,500,000 World War II
veterans have received readjust
ment payments of any kind and
fewer than 8 in every 100 have
claimed all of the allowances to
which they are entitled under the
GI bill.
Unemployment payments made
made to an average of 750,000
veterans during July, 1947, com
pared with a weekly peak of 1,
800,000 a year earlier. Self-em
ployed claimants, numbered 260,
000 during June, 1947, compared
with a monthly peak of 022,000.
FEINBERG. ILGWU LEADER,
LAUDED FOR HIS SERVICE
New York City.--A crowd of
1,000 persons in Town Hall paid
tribute to Israel Feinberg, vice
president of the International
Ladies Garment Workers Union
and general manager of the New
York Cloak Joint Board of the
union, in celebration of his 40
years of service in the labor
movement.
David Dubinsky, president of
the ILGWU, said Mr. Feinberg
had been instrumental in bring
ing to the cloak makers the high
standards and conditions that had
placed them at the top level of
American workers.
“The establishment of health,
vacation and retirement funds in
the cloak industry,” Mr. Dubinsky
added, “is due to his persistence
I and vision.”
MONEY
FIRST SECOND & THIRD AUTO LOANS
$50.00 Up '
ANY MAKE - ANY, MODEL
Royal Auto Finance Company
618 S. Tryon St. Phone 8-0164
' “KNOW THE ICE CREAM YOU EAT*
OUR PLEDGE OF QUALITY ON EACH PACKAGE
PET
ICE CREAM
mJUaMfiotT
PET DAIRY PRODUCTS CORP.
COMMA THUS9
wWI PUT TO PLIGHT
94 TNI QUO THINK MG
OP W««V IPSTIIN MO
TOMMY JOtM BUT JOB
MOGKK m BL4CKUACKID
BCh:NO. VVl PINO
Mux'S HOMC.
NATIOMAl
COULDN'T 00 A rmfi
DM/I IPJTEN ITAHTIO
KNOCK MI DOWN BUTCH
MATTIfl'f
GATES CLAIM CO
Tt€ PWHT *V
10 THi WHOU
THAT DBTV HAT!
MOW A80JT M*
MOTMT
NT OUB ffCNOS TO
THAT. THIS* RABBLE -
THRIVI ON ROTS AND
eiVS TRIM THE
TOATMfNT, AND THfVU
TOO UP...
TWQI?
Russian Tactics Call For
Plain Talking, Says AFL
(Continued From Page 1)
the United Nations should be kept
close to the people of all nations
through participation of such na
tional functional groups. Such
participation would replace ex
isting provisions, giving consulta
tive status to non-governmental
agencies, for the experience of
such groups would be considered
in the formulation of national
policies.”
Te P. O. Dept, reports that
5,000 mailings of lottery tickets
were mailed to union secretaries
in an effort to promote their sale,
which is .against the law and in
! violation of postal regulations.
The Post Office Department re
quests that all such tickets be
forwarded to the Post Office In
spector in Charge, San Fran
cisco, California.
HAVERTY
Has America's mist sensational combination
J
~Bend,y
E P-TAB L E
RADIO-PHtJNOGRAPH
WITH THE PHANTOM DIAL
Here ie the moat practical radio-phonograph com
bination ave've ever offered—a beautiful Sheraton
step-table, a brilliant Bendix Radio, and a fully auto
matic phonograph, all in one beautifully designed
piece of furniture to highlight your home! There's
no hint of a radio—no dials or switches—until you
t .» _ J_«_
and the “Phantom Dial” glows
as if by magic! No drawers to
pull, no doors to open!
Simply itide bath tka table tap—
there's yanr automatic phaaefraph!
Lari it with a da tan records ami
relax far am hear of music!
PRODUCT OP BCNDIX AVIATION CORPORATION
Budget Plan—Weekly or Montkly
wmlmmSmJm
Dial 7144
START
/■7
8>cuM*Ufi A
NOW
THE COMMERCIAL
NATIONAL BANK
Charlotte, N. C.
this Sign
S tbit Bottle
,rjelH Pionos
.onvenient Terms—
vKER-GARDNER ™
Sine* 188*
W. Trad* Phone HZ57
better health, became Its high
content of magnesium and cal
cium remineralizer the body
for vital energy. Free to use In
quantity. Odorless, pure and
natural. Case of U qts . $132.
delivered to your home Also In
S gallon demijohn for use In
bottle coolers.
TELEPHONE
os write to P. O.
Charlotte.
MIDAS WATER
De VONDE
Synthetic Clea ien, Dyer*
Hatters, furriers
S»*w Paints Why We Are One
of the South's Leading
Synthetic Cleaners
1. Restores original freshness
and sparkle.
2. Removes carefully all dirt,
dust and grease.
S. Harmless to the post deli
cate of fabrics.
i Odorless, thorough cleaning.
5. Garments stay clean longer.
? Press retained longer.
7. Reduces wardrobe upkeep.
De VONDE
Call 3-5125 121 W. 6th St.
It Pays To Trade With
BOGGETT
LUMBER CO.
211 E. Park Are. Phone S17t
FOREMOST PASTEURIZED MILK
Farm Fresh Milk—Foremost Ice Cream
Foremost Farms, Inc.
PHONES 7)16 — 7117
BwmiffttttnffiF^ftffitMtMftffftnintittiititfiinininittnfiinnfinirfflinntiHfnmiiiiiiiHOffHfitffftfOMiiiHitHinHiuiiiiiittim
ALLEN
OVERALL CO.
MANUFACTURERS OF
OVERALLS, ONE PIECE SUITS AND WORK PANTS
415 S. Church St. Phone 3-3598
CHARLOTTE. N. C.
i
A Bird You Want To Know
Pnwdljr we present the C8
ROOSTER • the new okMosi el
Colonial Stores.
The CS Rooster Is i new way
of Identifying Big Star and Little
Star Stores, and above all — A
MARK OF QUALITY- FOODS.
Join the thousands shopping
under the sign of the CS ROOST
ER today —you’ll be glad that
you did!
COLONIAL STORES
INCORPORATED
Martin’s Department Store
RELIABLE MERCHANDISE ALWAYS
AT LOW PRICES
AT CORNER TRADE AND COLLEGE
    

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