North Carolina Newspapers

    Editorial
CHARLOTTE LABOR JOURNAL & DIXIE FARM NEWS
Published Weekly at Charlotte, N. C._
H. A. Stalls, Editor andPublisher W. M. Witter, Associate Editor
Entered as second-class mail matter September 11, 1981, at the Post
Office at Charlotte, N. C., under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $2.00 per year, payable in advance or
6c per copy. I
ADVERTISING RATES for commercial advertising reasonable.
Official"Organ of the Charlotte Central Labor Union and Approved by
The American Federation of Labor and the
North Carolina Federation of Labor
Address AH Communications to Post Office Box 1061
Telephones 3-3094 and 4-5602
Office of Publication: 118 East Sixth Street, Charlotte, N. C.
The Labor Journal will not be responsible for opinions of corre
«r>on<'< r s. hut any erroneous "reflecting upon the character, standing oi
reputation of any person, firm or corporation which may appear in
the columns of The Labor Journal will lie gladly corrected when called
tn the attention of tne publisher. Correspondence and Open Forum
opinions solicited.
JOINT ACTION BY LABOR AND BUSINESS NECES
SARY TO STABILIZE PRICES
The AFL has declared that the problem of stabilizing
prices of industrial products is one for joint action of
management and labor; neither can do it alone.
This was the conclusion of an article appearing in "l-a
.bor’s Monthly Survey,” an AFL publication, calling for the
exercise of good statesmanship on the part of labor and
management in prompt and vigorous attempts “to stop
the price spiral before it goes too far.”
Substantial increases in workers’ living costs, with no ,
decline in sight* will force unions to seek additional wage
increases, the article said. Whether an upward spiral of,
prices will be touched off by such action depends upon the (
attitude and statesmanship of both labor and management,
the report declared. ,
Asserting that prices in most cases “have been raised
more than enough to offset wage increases, as is shown 1
by the high and rising level of profits,” the article reit
erated AFL policy calling for wage increases within ex
isting price levels.
“The American Federation of Labor has repeatedly
urged the policy of Wage increases without raising prices
as the only way real progress can be made. That policy
is more important than ever today as we face the dire
consequences of a new inflationary spiral. Such a policy
however can only succeed if management comes halfway,
submitting facts and figures acceptable to both parties to
show the wage increase possible without raising prices,
and sitting own in good faith with labor to work out ways
and means of raising wages within present prices.
“We have repeatedly pointed out that wage increases
account for only a small part of the price rises of 1946 and
1947. Information to show what part of a price'rise is
due to wages is not generally available; therefore the pub
lic is often misled by statements attributing price rises
entirely to wages. Interesting figures were recently pub
lished on the steel price increases, and since this has
caused hundreds of other price increases in products made
from steel it is worth noting. t
"In July, 1947, major steel companies raised their prices
$5 per ton for finished steel. Wages of steel workers had
risen in the spring, and prices of coal and scrap iron were
higher. Figures of U. S. Steel show the following: The
company’s shipments rose from 15,182,000 tons in 1946 to
(prohable) 20,232,000 tons in 1947. Because of this in
crease the cost of wages and salaries per ton dropped sub
stantially; in 1946 wage cost was $46.30 per ton, in the
second half of 1947 (after the wage increase) only $43.20
per ton. So actually the wage cost per ton after the
wage increase was $3.19 lower than it had been the year
before (1946).- Operating profit per ton was $19.00 after
the wage and price increases, compared to $13.41 per ton
in 1946.
“When federal taxes and the higher depreciation costs
are accounted for, profit per ton is estimated to be $2.10
more in the second half of 1947 (after wage and price
increase) than it was in 1946, and the company’s net prof
it per share of common stock is estimated at an annual
rate of $12.28 in the second half of 1947 compared to
$7.29 in 1946. These figures show conclusively that a sub
stantial part of the price increase served to raise profits,
and also that part of it was necessary to cover higher
depreciation charges. The higher cost of wages was offset
by the higher rate of operations.
“In citing these figures the American Federation of
Labor is in no sense attacking profits. We recognize that
the business man’s chance to make profits is a powerful
incentive to industrial progress, and that such progress,
when balanced by strong union organization and collective
bargaining, is the basis for higher living standards. It
should be clear to all however that the wage and profit
increases which cause a steady rise in prices and living
costs are self-defeating.
“The problem of stabilizing prices of industrial products
is one for joint action of management and labor; neither
can solve it alone. Nothing is gained by blaming labor
for price increases while profits soar to new all-time peaks.
Much can be lost by failure to face the problem squarely
and stop the price spiral before it goes tot) far.”
I
You Of Your Frmly tfd/A/'eed Your
Soc/al Security Curd to App/y
for SodOYSecarj tip dene fits
'OR MORE /X } //C
* informat/qn UOnAUZis
Your Union Social Security Committee,
Ofc tlie Nearest Sodal Security Office.
CJif NAT SCHAtHHER
DM ID BIRD
‘tFw! COHVM MKTW6
” SOT A B<s CBOWD
•KCAUSI OF THI
oar runs twuss
STABTED. JOI WOBKEB
GOT SLUGGED WOM BEHIND
AND IS NOW BECUPEQATING IN
SALLY SIMMS' WOMB. MEANWHILE
SATIS, DIANA DALE AND HASSLES
ABE IN CONFERENCE, F.GUBlNG HOW
TO CASH IN ON THE MEETING,..
NATIONAL LABOR SCRVKS «• «=*BS=3
<Afiv cowii vm tot
mm wrvi «nou»h
nt tmi ncxt oouicrON.
BAH! THIS 19 WHAT
VOU AMES ICANS CAU.
JT MAV B« PEANUT*,
HA9911B; BUT IT
ISN7 HAV) WHAT
DO YOU MIAN*
J L^.
AI VW5T 50 AFVSR T*E B£ D0uSH‘
KQT -Wig 9EM.V STUFF NOW MORTON
-BSES a smooth talker and used
TO BE IN CONGRESS.
BEFORE ME
KICKED OUT!
WLL WiSECRAC< ONCE TOO
OFTEN, DIANA, BUT M'HAT'B vOuR
SCHEME, HASSLER’
r »
OO WHAT DER FUEHRER DO IN
GERMANY. SEE A PEW BiB iNCUfiTBlALiSTB
WHO DON'T LIKE UNIONS. TELL 'EW
ALL UNIONS BE BUN BV BEDS AND
POBE.GNEBS TELL 'EM ONLY THE
CONDORS CAN BMf 'EM. THEN ASK
fob a million Bucks.
A MILLION SwC<5’ THAT'S A tOT
Of DOUGH. WILL ANYONE BE
DUMB ENOUGH TO MU POP >T»
<LRB BEGINS HEARING ON
VLLEGEI) VIOLATION OF
IECONDAKY BOYCOTT BAN
Chattanooga, Tenn. — A trial
ixaminer of the National Labor
delations Board began hearings
in charges alleging violation by a
inion of the Taft-Hartley Law’s
irovt.dons banning secondary boy
:otts.
The dispute involves the United
Brotherhood of Carpenters »nd
loinera of America, Local 74,
AFL which is accused by the
NLRB ar.d Watsons Specialty
Store with unfair labor practices
in refusing to work on a build
ing where non-union employes of
the specialty store were install
ing floor and wall coverings.
The complaint alleges that last
February the local demanded a
union contract with the specialty
store, which contracts to perform
interior decoration jobs and hires
carpenters to do the woik. The
store refused.
Later the union carpenters w^nt
to work on a house owned by
George D. Stanley, and when the
specialty store’s nonunion em
poyes arrived to install the floor
and wall coverings, the carpen
ters dropped their tools and de
manded that the contractor in
the case stop doing business with
the store. The NLRB charges
that this pressure constitutes a
secondary boycott.
AttorneVs for the union argued
that the hearings fhould be post
poned until the injunction suit
was decided, because the facts at
issue were identical; that, the
complaint lie dismissed on the
ground that the principal events
took place before the Taft-Hart
ley I.aw became effective, and
that the picketing allegations be
stricken out on the ground that
restriction of peaceful picketing
at any time was a violation of
the Constitutional guarantee of
freedom of speech.
All three motions were denied.
State of North Carolina,
County of Mecklenburg.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
Blanche H. Shields. Plaintiff, vs.
William L. Shields, Defendant.
NOTICE SERVING SUMMONS
BY PUBLICATION
The above named defendant will
taty> notice that an action as en
titled above has been commenced
in the Superior Court of Mecklen
burg Countv. North Carolina, by
the plaintiff to obtain an absolute
divorce upon the grounds of two
years separation; and the defen
dant .will further take notice that
he is required to appear at the
office of the Clerk of the Supe
rior Court of Mecklenburg County
at the Court House in Charlotte.
North Carolina within twenty <20)
days after the 20th day of Novem
ber, 1947, and answer or demur to
the complaint in the said action,
or the plaintiff will apply1 to the
Court for the relief demanded in
the said complaint.
This the 23rd dav of October,
1947.
J. LESTER WOLFE.
Clerk of Superior Court.
(10-21, 30; 11-6, 13-c)
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For the beat value in NEW or
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■State of North Carolina,
County of Mecklenburg.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
Bertha B. Howell, Plaintiff, vs.
Earl Palmer Howell, Defendant.
NOTICE OF SUMMONS BY
PUBLICATION
The above named defendant will
take notice that an action as en
titled above has been commenced
in the Superior Court of Meckleh
burg County, North Carolina by
the plaintiff to obtain an absolute
divorce upon the grounds of two
years separation; and the defen
dant will further take notice that
he is required to appear at the
office of the Clerk of the Supe
rior Court of Mecklenburg County
at the Court House in Charlotte,
North Carolina within twenty (20)
days after the 20th day of Novem
ber; 1947, and answer or demur
to the complaint in said action, or
the plaintiff will apply to the
Court for the' relief demanded in
the said complaint.
This the 23rd day of October,
1947.
J. LESTER WOLFE,
Clerk of Superior Court.
(10-23, 30; 11-6, 13-c)
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
PRELIMINARY CERTIFICATE
OF DISSOLUTION
To All to Whom These Presents
May Come—Greeting:
Whereas, It . appears to my satis
faction, by duly authenticated re
cord of the proceedings for the
voluntary dissolution thereof by
the unanimous consent of all the
stockholders, deposited in my of
fice, that Presson, Corse and
Keefer. Incorporated, a corpora
tion of this State, whose principal
office is situated in the City of
Charlotte, County of Mecklenburg,
State of North Carolina <T. S.
Corse being the agent therein and
in charge thereof, upon whom
process may be served), has com
plied with the requirements of
Chapter 55. General Statutes, «m
titled “Corporations,” preliminary
to the issuing of this Certificate
of Dissolution:
Now Therefore, I, Thad Eure,
Secreary of State of the State of
North Carolina, do hereby certify
that the said corporaton did, on
the 11th day of October, 1947,. file
in my office a duly executed and
attested consent in writing to the
dissolution of said corporation,
executed by all the stockholders
thereof, which said consent and
the record of the proceedings
aforesaid are now on file in my
said office a* provided by law.
In Testimony Whereof, I have
hereto set my hand and affixed
my official seal at Raleigh, this
11th day of October. A. D. 1947.
(SEAL) THAD EURE,
Secretary of State.
<10-23.36;ll-6-13-c)»
State of North Carolina,
County of Mecklenburg.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
Virginia Evelyn Dent, Plaintiff,
t vs. Wilbur Myers Dent, De
fendant.
Notice of Publication
The Defendant Above Named,
Take Notice:
That an action, as above en
titled. has been started in Meck
lenburg County, for an absolute
divorce on the grounds of two
successive years of separation
as is now provided by law for
such in the General Statutes of
North Carolina, and the said de
fendant will further take notice
that he is required -to appear be
fore the Clerk of the Superior
Court of Mecklenburg County at
Vs office in the Court House in
Charlotte. N. C., and answer or
demur to the complaint within
twenty (20) davs after the last
publication of this notice, or the
plaintiff will apple to the Court
for the relief demanded in said
complaint.
This, the 14th day of October,
1947.
J. I.ESTER WOLFE.
Clerk Superior Court.
<10-16, 23, 30; 11-6-c.)
Send in your news items. Local
Unions and Auxiliaries. We need
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