North Carolina Newspapers

    Editorial
CHARLOTTE LABOR JOURNAL & DIXIE FARM NEWS
Published Weekly at Charlotte, N. C._‘
B. A. Stalls, Editor and Publisher W. M. Witter, Associate Editor
Entered as second-class mail matter September 11, 1981, at the Post
Office at Charlotte, N. C., under the Act of Concrete of March 3,1879
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 12.00 per year, payable in advance or
5c per copy.
ADVERTISING RATES for commercial advertising reasonable.
Official Or^ran of the Charlotte Central Labor Union and Approved by
The American Federation of Labor and the
North Carolina Federation of Labor
Address All Communications to Post Office Boy 10di
Telephones 3-3084 and 4-5502
Office of Publication: 118 East Sixth Street, Charlotte. N. C.
The Labor Journal will not be responsible for opinions of corre
eiKir.oents. but any erroneous reflectinc upon the character, standinc 0T
reputation of any person, firm or corporation which may appear in
the columns of The Labor Journal will be gladly corrected when called
to the attention of the publisher. Correspondence end Open Forum
opinions solicited.
380 UNIONS CO-OPERATING IN SETTING UP NEW
APPRENTICE TRAINING PROGRAMS
Over 380 unions are cooperating with contractors in the
establishment of apprentice training programs for brick
masons. Ray A. Shipley, president of the Structural Clay
Products Institute, stated. The institute is a national as
sociation of brick and tile# manufacturers.
“The number of apprentices registered in the training
programs has passed 8300,” Shipley said.
“In Ohio alone, 732 employers and 44 local unions are
co-operating in providing training for 1,056 apprentices.
In Michigan, which ranks second in the number of em
ployers and unions, there are 514 employers, 31 unions and
472 apprentices. Pennsylvania reports 274 employers and
20 local unions, with a total of 521 apprentices.
Joint apprenticeship committees have been formed in
all but five States, and 25 States have 100 or more appren
tices in training.
“The 10 to 20 per cent gain m construction volume fore
cast for next year by the United States Department of
Commerce will mean a substantial increase in the amount
of masonry construction and will require a continued ex
pansion in the mason training program.
“It is estimated that fully 400 local communities in
which no apprentice mason programs have been established
to date will face shortages of skilled workers within the
next year or so unless training is started soon.
“The large backlog of housing and other construction
off«rs attractive employment opportunities for a record
breaking number of young men in bricklaying and other
building trades during the yec.rs ahead in all sections of
the country.
“The United States Apprentice Training Service is as
sisting the efforts of contractors, materials manufacturers
and labor unions to provide training for new workers.”
WASHBURN BlASfS EMPLOYER VIOLATIONS OF
CHILD LABOR/ MINIMUM WAGE, HOUR LAWS
Lester Washburn, International President of the AFL
United Auto Workers, on the basis of a recent report made
public by William R. McComb, Administrator of the Wage
and Hour and Public Contracts Divisions of the U. S.,
lashed out at the record number of violations by manage
ment of existing labor laws.
Washburn, asking that immediate remedial steps be
taken by labor and government to stop "the appalling up
ward trend” of violations by companies against protective
provisions for workers in the Fair labor Standards Act,
the Public Contracts Act, the Wage and Hour, Child la
bor, Minimum Wage and other laws, cited figures in
McComb’s report that the $18,000,000 in wages had been
illegally withheld by management from’ 811.236 employes.
More than half of the 40.350 or 7 per cent of the cov
ered establishments in the United States inspected during
the year ending June 30 were found by the Wage and
Hour an Public Contracts Divisions to have been in vio
lation of the minimum wage, overtime or child labor pro
visions, Washburn pointed out in referring to McComb’s
recent survey.
Failure to pay the minimum wage of 40 cents on hour
Washburn called an “intolerable practice under the con
stantly rising cost of living.” Yet, he said, failure to pay
the minimum wage was involved in the cases of 2700 em
ployers hiring 37.000 workers at less than the minimum
wage. *
Violations of the child labor provisions of the Public
Contract Act were found in 185 establishments, Washburn
said the McComb report showed, with substantial viola
tions of the record-keeping regulations of the Fair Labor
Standards Act uncovered in 14,000 companies.
LABOR PRESS HAILED AS KEY AGENCY IN JOB OF
KEEPING UNION MEMBERS INFORMED
The labor press is the logical vehicle for the dissemina
tion to union members of educational and informational
material on political matters, according to Arthur G.
McDowell, director of organization for the AFL’s Uphol
sterers’ International Union.
In an article appearing in the UIU Journal, McDowell
called for intensified activity to rid the labor movement
of Communists and laid down a three-point program de
signed to “permanently transform our American political
life for the better.” He said:
“Our first job is to inform our members and build ma
chinery to make that flow of information constant and re
liable. That means education, of which the labor press
is the first line.
"Our second job is to organize our members as citizens
in their unions and union activities.
"Our third job is to bring to a jell the liberal elements
to be found in the old parties and in every community and
build for the perpetuation and advancement of our demo
cratic Republic.
“This can be done through building a larger society of
farmers and workers and all their friends to permanently
transform our American political life for the better, far
beyond such a limited objective as removal of Taft, Hart
ley and their kind from public life.”
^ 8
. CAftTtRIAS
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landed into
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JOHNNY DOE'
DON’T HOBBY!
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YOU, JOHNNY?
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YOU MIAN'.
AW' VOU DON’T NKD 18
PQE’END: THE FOREMAN
T.PPIO ME Off. AiNT vER
A6.N UNIONS, AND
AMERICAN PROM MAY BACK.
JO* WORKER HAS REACHED FAST
BAM AT LAST, BUT WON'T THE
THUGS RECOGNIZE HIM?
ORGANIZATION AI. UNITY
CLOSER FOR TELEGRAPHERS
Los Angeles. — The _ Western
Un:or* Division^ of the AFL’s
Commercial Telegraphers’ Union
acted to bring about more direcf
organizational affiliation with the
parent union.
A\ its 7th annual convention
here, the Western Union Division
recommended that its divisional
headquarters in Kansas City. Mo.,
be eliminated and that every
Western Union Ideal affiliate di
rectly with the Commercial Tele
graphers’ Union with headquar
ters in Washington, D. C.
The recommendation is subject
to the approval of the convention
of the international union.
In other convention actions, the
Western Union delegates voted
for a resolution favoring govern
ment ownership of the communi
cations system and endorsed the
continuation of the campaign
against the Western Un'on Com
pany** policy of "economic sui
cide” in closing’offices and short
ening business hours.
ADMINISTRATRIX’S NOTICE
Having qualified as Administra
trix of the Estate of Marvin R.
Beatty, Sr., deceased, late of
Mecklenburg County, North Caro
lina, this is to notify all persons
having claims against the estate
of said deceased to exhibit them
to the undersigned at 214 John
ston Building, -Charlotte. North
Carolina, on or before the 27th
day of October, 1948. or this no
tice will be pleaded in bar of
their recovery. All persons in
debted to said estate will please
make immediate payment.
This the 27th day of October,
1947.
ELIZABETH H. PEATTY,
Administratrix of Estate of
Marvin R. Beatty, Sr.,
214 Johnston Building,
Charlotte, North* Carolina.
(10-M); 11-6,13,20-c)
State of North Carolina,
County of Mecklenburg.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
Blanche H. Shields, Plaintiff, vs.
William L. Shields, Defendant.
NOTICE SERVING SUMMONS
BY PUBLICATION
The above named defendant will
take notice that an action as en
titled above has been commenced
in the Superior Court of Mecklen
burg Countv, North Carolina, by
the plaintiff to obtain an absolute
divorce upon the grounds of two
years separation; and the defen
dant will further take notice that
he is required to appear at the
office oPthe Clerk of the Supe
rior Court of Mecklenburg County
at the Court House in Charlotte,
North Carolina within twenty (20)
days after the 20th day of Novem
ber. 1947, and answer or demur tc
the complaint in the said action,
or the plaintiff will apply1 to the
Court for the relief demanded in
the said complaint.
This the 23rd day of October,
1947.
3. LESTER WOLFE.
Clerk of Superior Court,
(10-23, 30; 11-6, 13-e)
Styles may come and styles may
go but Union Labels, Shop Cards,
and Service Buttons go on forever.
They are always in style.
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PIANOS
For the best value in NEW or
reconditioned pianos, select
yours from our stock of nearly
100 instruments. Setinway,
Mathushek, Winter, Howard,
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suit everyone.
ANDREWS MUSIC CO.
“Our 53th Year”
“Steinway Headquarters”
231 North Tryoa Street
State of North Carolina,
County of Mecklenburg.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
Bertha B. Howell, Plaintiff, vs.
Earl Palmer Howell, Defendant.
NOTICE OF SUMMONS BY
“ PUBLICATION
The above named defendant will
take notice that an action as en
titled above has been commenced
in the Superior Court of Mecklen
burg County, North Carolina by
the plaintiff to obtain an absolute
divorce upon the grounds of two
years separation; and the defen
dant will further take notice that
he ia required to appear at the
office of the Clerk of the Supe
rior Court of Mecklenburg County
at the Court House in Charlotte,
North Carolina within twenty (20)
days after the 20th day of Novem
I ber, 1947, and answer or demur
' to the complaint in said action, or
the plaintiff will apply to the
Court for the’ relief demanded in
the said complaint.
This the 23rd day of October,
1947.
J. LESTER WOLFE,
Clerk of Superior Court.
<10-23, 30; 11-6, 13-c) •
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
PRELIMINARY CERTIFICATE
OF DISSOLUTION
To All to Whom These Presents
May Come—Greeting:
Whereas, It appears to my satis
faction, by duly authenticated re
cord of the proceedings for the
voluntary dissolution thereof by
the unanimous consent of all the
stockholders, deposited in my of
fice, that Presson, Corse and
Keefer, Incorporated, a corpora
tion of this State, whose principal
office is situated in the City of
Charlotte, County of Mecklenburg,
State of North Carolina (T. S.
Corse being the agent therein and
in charge thereof, upon whom
process may lie served!, has. com
plied with the requirements of
Chapter 55. General Statutes, en
titled “Corporations,” preliminary
to the issuing of this Certificate
of Dissolution:
t r*..
Seer ear y of State of the State of
North Carolina, do hereby certify
that the said corporaton did, on
the Jlth day of October, 1947, file
in my office a duly executed and
attested consent in writing to the
dissolution of said corporation,
executed by all the stockholders
thereof, which said consent and
the record of the proceedings
aforesaid are now on file in my
said office as provided by law.
In Testimony Whereof, I have
hereto set my hand and affixed
my official seal at Raleigh, this
11th dav of October. A. D. 1947.
(SEAL) THAD EURE.
Secretary of State.
(10-23,30; 11-6-18-c)*
State of North Carolina,
County of Mecklenburg.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
Marguerite Lambert. Plaint:ff. vs.
Raymond Lambert. Defendant.
Notice of Publication
The Defendant Above Named,
Take Notice:
That an action, as above en
titled, has been started in Meck
lenburg County, for an absolute
divorce on the grounds of two
years’ separation, as is now pro-|
vided by law for such in the
General Statutes of North Caro
lina. and the said defendant will
further take notice that he is
required to appear before the
Clerk of the Superior Court of
Mecklenburg County at his off:ce
in the Court House in' Chariot**?.
N. C.. and answer hr demur to the
complaint within twenty days aft
er the last publication of this
notice, or the plaintiff will apply
tp the Court for the relief de
manded in said complaint.
This, the 7th dav of Novem
ber. 1947.
J. LESTER WOLFE.
Cjyrk of Superior Court.
(11-13, 20. 27; 12-4-c)
Send in your news items. Local
Unions and Auxiliaries. We need
your co-operation.
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