North Carolina Newspapers

    AIRFORCE
PLAN
U S. Army a.id
U. S. Air Force
POST OFFICE BUILDING. CHARLOTTE, N. C.
Located At
MINERS' AVERAGE PAY
SETS RECORD IN AUGUST
Washington, D. C.—Reflecting
new contract gains, average hour
ly earnings of bituminous coal
workers in August were $1,778,
a rise of almost 20 per cent over
June, the Bureau of Labor Sta
tistics reported.
Weekly earnings, at the record
average of $71.49, increased by
$4.40, or 6.6 per cent.
Hourly earnings in anthracite
mining also increased 8 per cent
over the period. Weekly earn
ing* were about $4 above June.
The bureau’* revised figures for
August showed that factory pro
duction workers earned an aver
age of $49.21 for an average
week of 39.8 hours. This is prac
tically unchanged from the July
level.
After reading The Journal, pass
it aa to year neighbor!
Some of The Things We
Lend Money on
Mm
Watrliee
Jewelry
Men's Clothing
Tools
Silverware
Shot Gom
Rifle#
Piatol#
Trunk*
Adding Mark]sea
jap
M
Typewriters
I Instrument#
All Bnsinees Strictly Confidential. When in Need
of Money We Newer Fail Yon.
8m as f#r bargain in diamonds, watchos. Jewelry, clothing, etc.
RELIABLE LOAN CO.
v Ml EA8T TRADE STREET
I
I THE BUTCHER, THI BAKER,
the KILOWATT-MAKER/
Reddy’s proud of his part in producing that
trio of prime necessities—Meat, Bread, and
Light.
He is doing the job of the Candlestick-Maker
better than it has ever done before ... and
he helps the Butcher and Bafcer in dozens of
ways to meet the needs of their Customers.
‘ ■ ■ ■ 4
fteddy, the Kilowatt-Maker, just marches
' along, doing more and more tp make Wfe
healthier, safer, and better-lighted for more
and more people ... at a lower and tower
cost per jobl
DUK
LI
POWEB COMPANY
ad
w
Last Polio Health Hint:
Avoid Sudden Chilling!
Sadden chilling each at
planting into cold water on a
very hot day shoald be avoided
a* the sixth aad Inal health
ho Oh
io
lane
National Fe
tile Paralysis eantions threegh
Ms local chapter.
’’no"!
GOOD
BOY ITS
(jjW.ICt / S\
Report Urges Ban On All
forms yi uiscnmination
Washington, D. C.—Presi-1
dent Truman’s committee on 1
civil rights called for the
erasure of discrimination
based upon race, color, creed
and national origin and de
clared the need for a perma
nent nation-wide system of
guardianship for the civil
rights of American citizens.
In a 178-page report submitted
to Mr. Truman, the committee
■aid the “American ideal still
awaits complete realizatiem ’
and made a total of 35 recom
mendations for enhancing the
dignity of the individual and
bolstering his rights, and for
sorting out the disloyal from tne
loyal. The report advocated the
legalized exposure of Communists
and “native fascists.’’
The American Federation of
Labor, through its representative
on the committee, Boris Shiskin,
AFL economist, participated in
the preparation of the report.
The report urged the President
to create a permanent Federal
commission on civil rights, and
the 48 states were asked to do
the same for themselves. Con
gress was asked to create a
standing committee on civil rights
and the Department of Justice
was advised to reorganize and
enlarge its dvjl rights section.
This was tne basic pattern of
Federal and state machinery
which the committee said it felt
was necessary to advance Amer
ican democracy.
While focusing its attention on
the bad side of the nation’s rec
ord with respect to the civil
rights of our citizens, the com
mittee made special mention of
the human progress made in this
country.
inis necessary emphasis upon
our country’s failures should not
be permitted to obsucre the real
measure of its successes. No
fqir-minded student of American
history, or of world history,
would deny to the United States
a position of leadership in en
larging the range of human lib
erties and rights, In recognising
and stating the ideals of free
dom and equality, and in stead
ily and loyally working to make
those ideals a reality.
“Whatever our failures in prac
tice have been or may be,, there
has never been a time when the
American people have doubted the
validity of those ideals. We still
regard them Is vital to our dem
ocratic system.”
The 35 recommendations cov
ered a wide range, including the
following proposals:
Affirmative work by Federal,
state and congressional organs
to improve civil liberties.
Revisions of statutes protect
ing individuals against encroach
ment of theft- rights and against
police brutality.
An anti-lynching act.
Prohibition of poll taxes as a
voting requisite. „ .
Abolition of white primaries.
Laws to compel Communist and
other subversive groups to dis
close their sponsorship, aims and
finances.
, Federal action to end segrega
tion of any kind which is based
on race, color, creed and nation
ality.
A campaign to educate the
people in a continuous program
to strengthen civil rights to be
conducted by the proposed Fed
eral commission.
Asserting that “the only aristoc*
racy that is consistent with the
free way of life is an aristoc
racy of talent and achievement,”
the committee briefly reviewed
some affirmative factors. Among
hose were the facts that Negroes
lave been accepted in big league
baseball and that high officials
of the armed forces show an in
creasing tendency to use more
Negroes and other minority
groups on a basis of equality with
white units. '
Reviewing the right to vote, the
committee said that the franchise
is barred to some because of race,
to others by institutions or pro
cedures which impede free ac
cess to the polls. Others were
disfranchised by electoral irreg
ularities or corrupt practices, and
the permanent residents of the
District of Columbia were ex
cluded from political representa
tion by “outmoded national tra
ditions.”
Most serious under this head
ing, continued the committee, was
the denial of suffrage to Negroes
in most southern states, but it
hailed recent “progress, limited
and precarious, but nevertheless
progress.”
VOTERS LEAGUE HOPES
TO RAISE $109,000 CHEST
San Diego, Calif.—The newly
created AFL Voters league of
this city has given notice that it
means business—and its first
business is the defeat in 1948 of
“Congresional enemies of labor.”
The league has started raising
a $100,000 war chest through
contributions from the 5,000 mem
bers of local AFL unions. Hail
the money collected will go to the
State AFL to assist its State
wide political program.
SEPTEMBER WEEKLY PAY
UP FOR FACTORY WORKERS
Washington, D. C.—A longer
work-week induced by expanded
seasonal operations and greater
availability of materials boosted
the September average weekly
earnings for workers in manufac
turing industries to $50.42, ac
cording to preliminary estimate*
prepared by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
PATRONIZE JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
takes pleasure in announcing
its new, permanent location at
237 NORTH TRYON
MAYFAIR HOTEL BUILDING
t
Charlotte’s time-of-day service now continues in a fine new
home ... at 237 Nqrth Tryon. To its advertisers and its
10,000 daily callers. Time Service promises a continually
improved and modernized service . . . that brings excellent
results to advertisers and prompt, clear time announce
ments to callers. The Time Service staff invites you to
visit them whenever you wish. ,*
*
TIME . > . 32155
For 15 Years Charlotte’s Timekeeper
Union Label
PRINTING FOR LOCAL UNIONS
^2 ° tgfr ° 2 2
We are in position to Furnish
you with high class stationery,
by-laws, etc., on Union-Made
Paper by Union Craftsmen.
Our workmanship guaranteed
to please.
Dial 4.5502
H. A. STALLS PRINTING CO.
P.O.Box 1061 118 Eatt'6th Street
Charlotte, North Carolina
    

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