North Carolina Newspapers

    Editorial
CHARLOTTeTaBORJOCRN TL *i)fxiE“FARM NEWS
Published Weekly at Charlbtte, N. C.
H A. Stalls, Editor and Publisher W. M. Witter. Associate Editor
Entered as second-class mail matter September 11, 1931, at the Post
Office at Charlotte. N. C„ under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $2.00 per year, payable in advance or
5c per copy.
ADVERTISING RATES for commercial advertising reasonable.
Official Organ of the Charlotte Central I-abor Union and Approved by
The American Federation of Labor and the
North Carolina Federation of Labor
Address All Communications to Post Office Boa 106i
Telephone* 3-3094 and 4-5502
'•tfice of Publication: 118 East Sixth Street, Charlotte. N. C.
The Labor Journal will not be responsible for opinions of corre
spondents. ho' nnv erroneous reflecting upon the character, standing oi
reputation of any person, firm or eo-poration which may appear in
the columns of The l-abor Jourrfftl will be gladly correcte-i when caller
to the s'ten* ion of toe publisher. Correspondence and Open Forun
•pinions solicited.
AFL UNIONS APPROVE ALL-OUT POLITICAL DRIVE
DURING 1948
In an historic move, the American Federation of Labor
has charted the course its political organization will follow
in its efforts to oust! the foes of labor from Congress and
and the state legislatures.
More than 200 officials of the AFL's 105 national and
international unions, at a special conference in Washington,
formally organized “Labor’s Educational and Political
T ea^ue” and willed upon the AFL’s nearly 8,000,000 mem
bers for voluntary contributions of a minimum of $1 each
to finance its undertakings. ,
Plans for the league call for an intensified drive to get
out the labor vote in 1918 and to inform AFL members
concerning the position taken by candidates for election
on the Taft-Hartley law and other vital problems affecting
organized labor. A report embodying these purposes and
setting forth details of organization and operation of the
league was submitted by the AFL Executive Council and
unanimously and enthusiastically approved by the confer
ence.
AFL President William Green was named chairman of
the league and George Mean.v, secretary-treasurer of the
AFL, was elected to a corresponding position in the politi
cal organization.
The meeting set up u national committee composed of
he AFL Executive Council and the presidents of the 105
national and international affiliated unions. This comnfittee
will have general supervision over the activities w the
organization.
To direct its operations, the leatfie will have a 30-mem
ber administrative committee consisting of the AFL Ex
ecutive Council and 15 additional members. This, commit*
tee was authorized to expand ..its number^ as circumstances
dictate by the appointment of not mere than 5 additional
members. ' **
Swinging into action immediately following the general
conference, the administrative committee met and author
ized Mr. Green and Mr. Meany to appoint 4ft subcommittees
on finance, organization^ and the selection of mi executive
director for the league. These committees are scheduled
to report to the administrative committee at its next meet-j
ing expected to be held before the end of the year.
To carry the organization down to the “grass roots’*
level additional working committees will set up by the
national unions and their local affiliates, state federations,
and city central bodies.
Funds in the form of voluntary contributions will be
raised by the national and international unions. Half of
the suggested $1 minimum contribution will be turned over
to the national league with the other half remaining for
use in the area in which the contribution was made. The
league may reallocate its funds for use in any state or
congressional district where conditions warrant the use of
a greater sum than that normally retained in the area.
The program for the league leaves the way open for co
operation with “non-Communist organizations” which see
eye-to-eye with the AFL on political issues. This rules out
co-operation with the CIO at the national level, AFL Presi
den William Green declared. H
Commenting upon the step taken by the AFL, its first
venture into the political arena on a large scale, Mr. Green
characterized the action as '‘historic’' and an intensification
of the old Gomperg policy of “rewarding our friends and
punishing our enemies.” He voiced labor’s determination
to fight for the repeal of all anti-labor legislation and said
the organization of the political league became necessary
“because a reactionary Congress has fastened its shackles ■
on labor.’’
George Meany, secretary-treasurer of the AFL, told the,
conference that establishment of the league was not a de
parture from the AFL’s political policy but was meant to
give effect to that policy I’in the light of modern condi
tions.”
He predicted success for the AFL political undertaking
and declared that lalK>r's fees will find that “you cannot
'step on the people and get away with it indefinitely."
Alexander Hose of the Hatters Union called the move to
set up a political organization a decision of “great historical
importance.” He declared that labor was now determined
"to break the greatest monopoly of all, the political mon
opoly.’’
Daniel J. Tobin, president of the Teamsters Union, em
phasized that the conference would lay a foundation for
the future and that the result of the league's activities
would be of great value to the workers in the nation regard
less of the result of the 1948 election campaign.
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N*T SCHACHHER
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COLOR, KU6ION ON HATIONAUTY*
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HOIMI AT TUMI TiMH
rr» nut WOBTH?
WOW DOM OAVl IPff’I'N KNOW THAT
SMITH'# RIAL NAMI 6 HA6SLIR.
NATION TO ACHIEVE 60.000,000 JOBS IN 1918 FOR
SECOND TIME
Employment in 1918 will probably hit the previously
it a:wd record ci 60,000,000 jobs, Robert C. Goodwin, di
rector of the Uni ed Sta.e9 Employment Service, predicted.
Meanwhile the Census Bureau reported that employment
n November dropped just'over 600,000 because of a season
I deedr.e in farm work. Nc-n-agricultural employment con
inued to rise, however, to new levels, the bureau declared.
Mr. Goodwin said his ‘‘best information” was that na
tional mployment would hover around record levels most
of next year. Although farm labor would be scarce, he
said, the employment service vvu p.anning a campaign to
recruit agrkuiaural workers.
__ In this connection. Hie Government has reached a new
agreement with Mexico to permit the importation of Mexi
cans for farm work next year when this country’s farm
labor supply runs short.
Watson B. Miller, Commissioner of Immigration and
Naturalization, said the agreement w.as an extension of a
wartime practice begun in 1943. The wartime arrange
ment, however, limited the importation of Mexican labor to
100,000 annually. The new agreement will have no limita
tion.
Mr. Goodwin said that the employment service would
take over the responsibility for recruiting farm labor at a
time when “less labor will be available for apiculture than
since the end of the war.”
"The demand for farm labor in 1948 probably will be the
greatest in peacetime history,” he said.
Mr. Goodwin said that officials of the employment serv
ice over the country were consulting with farmers, farm
organizations and food processor groups tp determine fu
ture farm labor needs and to develop programs for supply
ing them.
said the job was a big one and would “require the
closest co-operation between the employment service,
farmers and other groups and individuals concerned with
Ik maximum production of food.”
THE MUCH Or LABOR
WBgggggS?*
ALL 1
^ION-MADE
HMSANDOfS
REAR THIS
UNION LABEL
E /
:L
m-CEStt
KNOW THE ICE CREAM YOU EAT” *
OCR PLEOOF OF QUALITY ON EACH PACKAGE
PET l»\IRY PRODUCTS COUP.
GREEN URGES HELP
FOR FARM STRIKERS
Washington, D. C.—AFL Presi
dent William Green appealed for
financial assistance for the strik
ing members . of the National
Farm Labor Union which is con
ducting a strike against the huge
Di Gorgio Faria at Bakersville. !
'■ If.
In a circular letter to all na
tional and international unions,
Mr. Green declared the manage
ment of the farm has refused to
recognize the union or to engage
in collective bargaining for in
creased wages and improved
working conditions. He declared:
“Reports indicate the existence
of a fine spirit'and morale among
the strikes, but because the Na
tional Farm Labor Union, which
is one of the newest intmational
unions to be chartered by the
American Federation of Labor,
is not financially able to extend
the help and assistance which the
strikers need at the moment, we,
the officers of the American Fed
eration of Labor, art appealing
to you for financial contributions
for the purpose of supplying food
and assistance to the striking
farm workers herein referred to.
“It is reported that this strike
is effective. The workers need
help and support, however, in
order to win. Please make a gen
erous contribution to these gal
lant strikers and help them to
the extent of your financial abil
ity.
After readiag The Journal, pass
; on to your neighbor!
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