North Carolina Newspapers

    CHARLOTTE
LABOR JOURNAL
VOL. XVIII; NO. 34
CHARLOTTE. N. C„ THURSDAY. JANUARY ft. 1949
Slllwrintln. <9 AA P» Vm>
AFL ENDORSES MARCH OF DIMES CAMPAIGN
PRIZES TOTAUNGMORE THAN $15,000 WILLBE AWARDED BY LOGAL FIRMS
Buick Roadmaster
Sedan Tops Gifts
CHARLOTTE’S QUOTA $100,000 — HEADQUARTERS
FOR MARCH OF DIMES AT 127 EAST
FOURTH STREET
[Mecklenburg ’< I®4® of Dimes quota, has been set
at $100,000 and Chairman Bill Parker of the Mecklenburg
County committee is perfecting plans in order that when
the campaign closes January 31 this quota will have been
raised and perhaps greatly exceeded.
In an effort,to secure the close co-operation of all the
public communications systems, the newspapers, the radios,
etc., Mr. Parker called a meeting this week of representa
tives of these organizations and had full discussion of the
problems that lie ahead. Representatives from the news
papers and radio stations were present and each was in
vited to participate in making helpful suggestions toward
the campaign’s prosecution.
Mr. Parker announced that scores of Charlotte business
firms had pledged their co-operation toward making the
drive a huge success and were offering their services and
also prizes to be awarded during various stages of the
money-raising activities.
Winners in the March of Dimes jingle contest Will collect
more than $16,000 worth of prizes, including a four-door
Buick Custom Roadmaster, a completely installed modern
kitchen, and many other valuable items.
The list of prizes grew' yesterday with the Southern Ap
pliance company offering a complete deluxe laundry con
sisting of a Bendix home washer, a cabinet electric ironer,
an electric or gas drier, and a Kaiser hydraulic dish wash
er. These have an estimated value of $1,000.
Sponsors of the contest announced also the addition of
a Motorola portable radio to the prize list.
Anyone is eligible to compete. All he or she needs to do
is add the last line of the four-line jingle, the first three
lines of which appear in the accompanying entry blank.
The line contributed may rhyme with any of the other
three, officials of the contest announced.
The entry then must be accompanied by a contribution
to the $100,000 March of Dimes quota in Mecklenburg.
Any contribution of $5 or more will also entitle the donor
to a ticket to the January 16 show of the nationally famous
“Quiz Kids” at Armory-Auditorium, provided the entries
are postmarked not later than January 12.
All entries should be mailed to March of Dimes Head
quarters, 127 East Fourth Street, Charlotte, N. C.
COMPLETE THE JN6LE MO HELP FI6HT POUO
Complete this jingle, enclose your contribution and
mail to March of Dimes Headquarters, 127 East Fourth
Street, Charlotte, N. C.
My contribution is in dollars this time
Instead of the usual dime;
To fight polio harder than ever
Because
SUBMITTED BY.
Address..
i
State Mediation
Efforts Increased
Dnring Past Year
Allbany, N. V.—The 1,364 med
iation cases disposed of by the
New York State Board of Media
tion during the first 10 months
of 1948 represent a 61 per cent
increase over the number closed
aunng me cott es jwnanij? pertoa
of 1947, the State Labor Depart
ment reported. More than 200,
000 workers were involved in the
case load.
Two-thirds of the total, 960
cases, were closed following joint
mediation conferences or indirect
mediation activity. Of 702 cases
which were potential stoppages
at the time of intervention, only
70 developed into stoppages. In
100 other cases stoppages ex
isted at the time of intervention.
Agreements to arbitrate in the
event of failure of mediation ex
isted in 158 cases.
The remaining 404 cases were
closed by withdrawal or settle
ment prior to joint conference.
TURN YOUR MARCH OF DIMES INTO A MARCH OF
DOLLARS—HELP COMBAT THE DREADED POLIO!
Five Years Of Polio
194* 1
27.000|,n
1947 ]
10734 I
194* ]
206981 •
13.619 1:
l94+ f
190291
20-V*AVtJLj
9379 J
fACH SYMOOl
MWSfMTS 2000
coses
* 1926-19*7-meu/s/¥t
t
Green Urges Labor
To Do Its Utmost
William Green, president of-the American. Federation of
I,abor, has fully endorsed the plea of Basil O’Connor,
president of the National Foundation for Infantile Paraly
sis, for a record-breaking 1949 March of Dimes campaign.
In a letter to Mr. O’Connor, Mr. Green urged “every
member of unions affiliated with the American Federation
of Labor to give his utmost support to this splendid cause."
The labor leader recalled that ^stricken children of many
This pledged support by labor of the 1949 March of
Dimes came after Mr. O’Connor revealed that the cost of
aid and treatment alone of victims in the 1948 epidemics
upwards of 27,000 children and adults were stricken in
this worst polio year in more than three decades—will ex
ceed $17,000,000. This cost will continue high in 1949 since
treatment in a great number of cases must continue
through many months, and in some instances for years.
In his letter, Mr. Green pointed out that labor ‘this year
is deeply conscious of the ravages infantile paralysis has
caused throughout the nation.’’ Mr. Green asked Federation
members to keep in mind “the services rendered by the
National Foundation for Dlfantile Paralysis in meeting
the widespread epidemics” which raged with particular
fury in Texas, North Carolina, and more than a dozen
other states.
To carry on its fight against polio through research and
education, to continue its important work of aid and treat
ment and ,to arm against next Summer’s expectfed epidem
ics, the National Foundation has asked every’ one to give
at least 50 per cent more during the 1949 March of Dimes
campaign, January 14-511.
Taft-Hartley Law Affects
Local Home-Building Industry
Washington-The Taft-Hart
ley law gives the National Labor
Relations Board jurisdiction over
labor disputes arising in the
•building construction industry, ac
cording to a decision rendered by
an NLRB trial examiner.
The decision in a case involving
a $325 electrical subcontract on a
$15,000 house in Greenwich,
Conn., completely reversed the
traditional stand of the NLRB
which, under the Wagner Act,
kept hands off the industry.
Earl S. Bellman, the examiner,
\
based his decision on the argu-.
ment that the construction of the !
house was ‘embedded in a net
work of commercial relationships |
(which) * * * in their rami*
, fications * • * manifestly affect
commerce.’*
Mr. Bellman declared:
“It is apparent that numerous
strands in the web of commerce,
several of which crossed state
lines, were interlaced in the con
struction of the Greenwich house.
The fact that the value of the
materials directly involved in its
construction was not large is not
controlling.”
For more than a decade the
NLRB held that the old Wagner
Labor Relations Act did not give
it jurisdiction over the building
and construction industry, since
(Continued on Page 4)
STARTING TODAY
Today Hie Charlotte Labor
Journal runs the find of three
cartoon strips as a reminder to all
to Join the 1949 March of Dimes.
Last year was a Mack one in
polio history. So we are anxious
to co-operate in the l|ht against
infantile paralysis. These car
toons vividly stress the urgent
need of the National Foundation
for Infantile Paralysis and its
local chapter to replenish funds
exhausted in fighting polio last
TURN YOUR MARCH OF DIMES INTO A MARCH OF DOLLARS—HELP COMBAT THE DREADED POLIO!
HERE’S UN DA
J
TURN YOUR MARCH OF DIMES INTO A MARCH OF DOLLARS—HELP COMBAT THE DREADED POLIO
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view