North Carolina Newspapers

    Editorial
CH ARLOTTE LABOR JOURN iL & DIXIE FARM NEWS
Pabli»h«d Weekly at Charlotte, N. C.
B. A Stolls. E 'Itor and Publisher W. M. Witter, Assscisto Editor
Entered as second-class mail matter September 11, 19S1, at the Poet
Office at Charlotte, N. C., under the Act of Congress of March S, 1879
SUBSCRIPTION KATES. $2 00 per year, payable in advance or
8c per copy.
The Labor Journal will not be responsible for opinions of corre
spondents, hut any erroneous reflecting upon the character, standing or
reputation of any person. Arm or corporation which may appear in
the columns of The Labor Journal will be gladly corrected when called
to the attention of toe publisher. Correspondence and Open Forum
•pinion* solicited. >
Were it not for the labor press the labor movement
would not be what it is today, and any man who tries
to injure a labor paper is a traitor to the cause.
—AFL President Gomper3.
LAGGING CAMPAIGN RATHER DISCOURAGING
Unless Mecklenburg county's March of Dimes campaign
picks up considerable momentum during the remaining
days of the drive this county will not have raised its $100,
000 quota by January 31. If the splendid workers back of
the drive were to accept this lack of giving in. a pessimistic
vein perhaps they would lay down and let the drive end
up tallying a huge shortage. But knowing many of the
persons connected with the local March of Dimes. Staff so
well The Labor Journal predicts that this lack of interest
(will not glow them d?WT» one iota in their efforts to raise
?hS eounty's alloted quota. - - . .i ... ..
Now that We are confident the committee and its work
ers are out doing their utmost to aid the unfortunate vic
tims of last year’s polio epidemic, as well as those who .may
become victims in the future, by assisting in the raising
of funds to be used in caring for the unfortunates, every
able man and woman in the county should join in on this j
Community Campaign and do his or her part to assist
every way possible. Who knows when this dread disease
may strike, and whom and where?
Caring for Polio victims is an expensive ordeal. Those
whom we have in our hospitals at the present time require
about $5,000 per month to maintain them where they may
receive the proper treatment. The treatment is of too long
duration in most cases, and also too expensive, fdr the
average individual working for a living to afford, but it
must be maintained for all alike. Therefore everyone is
asked to contribute his full share in ord£r that the lives
of children may be saved, and their little limbs and bodies
ministered unto. ‘ -
Men and women of Mecklenburg, rise to the great need
of the hour! Demonstrate a greater and more loving com
munity spirit! Give to this very worthy cause until it
hurts. "
.. -- -- * v.
GOMPERS ON RUSSIA, .
(27 Years Ago) . •
“In Soviet Russia the Bolsheviks are using many Words
with a new meaning. It has been shown, how they spme
times employ the word ‘democracy’ tc> mean the reVerse
of what all civilized peoples and all the labby movements
of the world have hitherto meant by the word. So also,
after abolishing all the rights of labor and labor organiza
tions and of co-operatives, the Bolshevists, ‘nevertheless,
continue to apply the terms ‘trade unions' and ‘co-opera
tives’ to the empty shells that remain.”
Commodities are designated by brand, names and human
beings are distinguished by Union Labels!
Top North Carolina 4-H’ert Win Special X*cogni(ion
SUPERIOR records In 1M8 National 141 ’’TCSereat Ion and Rural
Arts, Dairy Production. Froten Fooda; Field Crop* and.-Soil Con
servation program*] won five North C-ar^Uua club; n^ctpbt-rs special
recognition. The winners and brief outlines of their records 'follow I '
it
Warren Mallard
H. A. ScoH, Jr.
CK#lli« ParrltH '
»Pant M.
vy*«ow. ..i
I
J*m«i Wright
JlcklM
Promoting recreational and
handicraft work haa brought State
recognition to Warren Mallard. 17,
of Trenton. Hta record will be
judged to determine the eight na
tional winners in the 1918 Na
tional 4-H Recreation and Rural
Aria program.
Objectives of the program are
to aaaiat 4-H members in develop
ing cultural and recreational op
portunities in tbeir homes and
communities; help 4-H members
develop a higher appreciation of
rural arts; make 4-H programs
more attractive and self-satisfying
and teach members to lead rec
reational activities. Bach of the
counties having an outstanding
recreational program received a
$25.00 cash award, provided by
United States Rubber Company.
H. A. Scott, Jr., 17, of Haw
River, was the top State winner
whose record waa considered for
sectional and national honors in
the National 4-H Dairy Produc
tion awards program. During 7
years in club work, Henry com
pleted four dairy projects, he has
developed dairy cattle, entered
Judging and showmanship contests
and given many dairy demonstra
tions. He serves his club as presi
dent. As a recognition of feta
achievements in dairy production,
Henry was awarded a $26.00 V. 8.
Savings Bond, provided by Kraft
Foods Company.
Learning to free re foods that
make for a tastier, healthier diet
haa won State 4-H honors for
Chellle Parrish. 18, of Benson.
Cbellie learned much about select
ing and processing foods for stor
ing In her home and community
freezer by taking part in the 1948
National 4-H Frozen Foods pro
gram. She prepared and stored
1,046 pounds of meat and poultry,
193 quarts of fruits and vege
tables. She has served her club as
reporter and junior leader. 8he
has completed 25 projects during
vis yewrs.of club wprk. pf .which
two were fu frozen food*. Tor
these 4-H achievements Interna
tional Hai^ster has • provided
Chellie with a IM.00 U. S. Saving*
Bpud.
An outstanding youthful farmer,
Paul M. Wagoner. IS, of Gibson
ville, has- won State honors In the
National 4-H Field Crops award*
program. Paul planted and tended
3 acres of oats, lyi acres of corn,
1 3/M acres of wheat, and one
of barley this year, and learned
much about seed bed preparation,
use of fertilisers and approved cul
tivating an<J harvesting method*.
During seven years In 4-H he com
pleted 30 prefects, including five
in Held crops; . made 18 4-H
speeches at club, community and
school meetings and over the
radio; wrote 19 news stories on
4-H tours, camp and special
events. He has served his local
club as president and vice-presi
dent, and his county club as
secretary. In recognition of his
achievements. International Har
vester Co. provided Paul with a
National 4-H Club Congress all
expense trip award.
James Wright Jackson, 17. of
Godwin, has been named sectional
winner as a result of hie outstand
ing achievements in the 1948 Na
tional 4-H 8oil Conservation pro
gram. James planted 3,000 Lob
lolly pines; seeded three acres of
crimson clover for fall grazing,
three acres of rye as winter cover
for tobacco, and two acres of
permanent pasture; and put into
practice many other soil saving
and building operations. A six-year
4-H‘er, James has served his local
club a* president, leader anj vice
president;' and bis county organi
zation as president and secretary.
In recognition of his 4-H achieve
ments, he has been awarded an
all-expense trip to the National
4-H Club Congress, Chicago, pro
vided by Firestone.
All of these activities are conducted under the direction of the Exten
sion Service of the State Agricultural College and US DA cooperating.
TURN YOUR MARCH OP DIMES INTO A MARCH OF
DOLLARS—HELP COMBAT THE DREADED POLIO!
Green Urges Labor
To Do Its Utmost
William Green, president of the American Federation of
Labor, has fully endorsed the plea of Basil O’Connor,
president of the National Foundation for Infantile Paraly
sis, for a record-breaking 1949 March of Dimes campaign.
In a letter to Mr. O’Connor, Mr. Green urged “every
member of unions affiliated with the American Federation
of Labor to give his utmost support to this splendid cause.”
The labor leader recalled that “stricken children of many
members of the American Federation of Labor again have
j been helped along the road to recovery through chapters
of the National Foundation.’’
This pledged support by labor of the 1949 March of
i Dimes came after Mr. O’Connor revealed that the cost of
' aid and treatment alone of victims in the 1948 epidemics
I—upwards of 27,000 children and adults were stricken in
j this worst polio year in more than three decades—will ex
ceed $17,000,000. This cost will continue high in 1949 since
i treatment in a great number of cases’ must continue
| through many months, and in some instances for years.
In his letter, Mr. Green pointed out that labor ‘this year
is deeply conscious of the ravages infantile paralysis has
caused throughout the nation.” Mr. Green asked Federation
members to keep in mind “the services rendered by the
National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis in meeting
the widespread epidemics” which raged with particular
fury in Texas, North Carolina, and more than a dozen
other states.
To carry on its fight against polio through research and
education, to continue its important work of aid and treat
ment and ,to arm against next Summer’s expected epidem
ics. the National Foundation has asked every one to give
at least 50 per cent more during the 1949 March of Dimes
campaign, January 14-31.
TURN YOUR MARCH OF DIMES INTO A MARCH OF
DOLLARS—HELP COMBAT THE DREADED POLIO!
Some of The Things We
Lend Money on
Watches
Jewelry
Men’s Clothing
Toole
Silverware
Shot Guns
Rifles
Pistols
Trunks
Adding Machines
Bags
Salt Case*
Musical Ininanria
Kodaks
Typewriters
Ail Business Strictly Confidential. When in Need
of Money We Never Fail You.
See us for bargain In diamonds, watches, jewelry, clothing, etc.
RELIABLE LOAN CO.
Ml BAST TRADE STREET
mnouiu
1. Don’t attend meetings.
2. If yon go, go lata.
3. If the weather isn’t pleas
ant, stay home. ,
4. Don't accept any office; it's
easier to criticise.
6. Never approve anything
your officers or committees
6. Don’t pay your dues until
you have to.
7. Don’t bother recruiting new
members.
8. Insist on official notices
being sent you, but don’t pay
any attention to them when
you get them.
9. Don’t waste any courtesy at
a meeting. It’s up to your
officers to take it.
10. When you don’t like what’s
going on say so, but under
no circumtences offer any j
constructive suggestions.
11. Devote most of your time
talking; let someone else do
the work.
12. If elected a delegate to a
higher body or convention,
don’t bother about attending
meetings.
13. Then you can report when
you get home that the or
ganisation is in the hands
of a political gang and that
there is no use trying to do
anything about it.
14. Look for hidden motives;
don’t credit brother or sister
members with any ideals.
15. Don’t co-operate with any
officer or committee; make
them co-operate with you.
16. Remember that you know
more than anyone else about
everything. If they don’t
agree with you, they’re
wrong.
(Reprint from Cleveland Citizen.)
!
The Golden Rule of Trade Un
ionism is to buy Union Label
roods from others as you would
have them pay Union wares unto
yen!
tUaSimm
Stkhtattfa W
New and Reconditioned
PIANOS
For the beat value in NEW ar
reconditioned pianos, select
youra from our stock of nearly
100 instruments. Setinway,
Mathushek, Winter, Howard, |
and many others. Prices to
suit everyone.
ANDREWS MUSIC CO.
“Our 55th Year’*
“Steinway Headquarters”
211 North Tryon Street
A. fir M. Food Store
155V Cliffwood Piece
Telephone 4*5069
CHARLOTTE. N. C.
THE COMMERCIAL
NATIONAL BANK
Charlotte, N C.
L '
—
Sherron Grocery
220 Lakewood Arc.
Tel. 3-3590
CHARLOTTE. N. C.
Benard's
Gulf Service
Complete One Stop Service
1600 South Boulevard
Telephone 5-9193
CHARLOTTE, N. C.
W. L. Byrum
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
Shopton Rood
Tel. 39-9481
Route 3, Charlotte, N. C.
Whife Star
Super Market
832 West Boulevard
Telephone 3-8970
CHARLOTTE, N. C.
Prosperous New Yeor!
White Food Store
3106 N. Caldwell
Tel. 2-4605
CHARLOTTE, N. C.
For Indigestion, Sour Stomach and Gas, Take
NA-CO TABLETS
SELWYN CUT RATE DRUG STORE
109 SOUTH TRYON * I?ft NORTH TRYON
Proodly v* proseat tlw CS
ROOSTER • the m* tsbka il
Colonial Stores.
Tho CS Rooster Is a bow way
of identifying Big Star and Littfa
Star Stores, and a boro all — A
MARK OF QUALITY FOODS.
Jola the thousands shopping
oadcr the siga of the CS ROOST
ER today — you'll bo glad that
yoa did!
COLONIAL STORES
» INCORPORATED •
ATRORIZE JOURNAL ADVERTISERS
Martin’s Department Store
RELIABLE MERCHANDISE ALWAYS
AT LOW PRICES
Shop at VYlcvdin and Suva
SHOES-CLOTHING—FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
AT CORNER TRADE AND COLLEGE
)
    

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