North Carolina Newspapers

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MORTON REFM6ERHTI00 SOLES AMO SERVICE, INC.
Franklin A. Morton
TRoneHs Fevry Road Telephone 4-6094
Charlotte, N. C.
I
F & J BUILDERS SUPPLY COMPANY
2319 Hutchison Ave Telephone 3 9693
Charlotte, N. C.
Vi
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BIRNURDT MANUFACTURING CO., INC.
Charlotte, North Carolina
ADD THESE DP
You—
A good light— -,
The evening paper, or your favorite book
. < . The answer will be pure content
ment for long evenings.
"Good" for reading light means I
Plenty of ifght — 100
watts or more.
Lamp in the right place
—by your favorite choir
of course.
Free from glare — a
white or white • lined
shade helps.
Properly distributed —
on the printed page,
with paper or book held
at a comfortable posi
tion.
DURE POWER COMPANY
"t/jt fujeJmont Gievnas.
National Magazine Flays
Abuse Of Child Labor
Washington.—Labor’* drive for
strengthening of the nation’s
child labor laws won support from
a widely circulated, national mag
azine.
The February issue of the “Wo
man’s Home Companion” calls
for action to curb the increasing
employment of children at jobs
“that are often physically and
morally dangerous.”
“What’s come over the Ameri
can men and women that we can
be complacent about a social evil
that was once a Number One call
to arms—child labor,” the maga
zine demands. “How can we
stand calmly by while hard-won
laws regulating the employment
of children are whittled down bit'
by bit?”
The article goes on to cite
shocking examples of children
maimed and killed while employ
ed in violation of law—an 8-year
old boy who lost two Angers
when - his hand caught in a fac
tory conveyor belt; a 14-year girl
who lost an arm in a laundry
extractor; a 15-year boy who had
three fingers severed in a meat
cutting machine.
“Wherever children work in in
dustry, the accident rate is going
to be high.” the article points out.
“Statistics, show that children un
der 18 are one and half tjmes
more subject to disabling injuries
than their elders with more ex
perience and judgment.
“Yet, while employment of
children is on the Increase, con
trols are being weakened, stand
ards lowered.”
It’s not only in factories that
youngsters are employed on haz
ardous jobs, the magazine stresses.
“Much of it is far less obvious,
but equally dangerous,” the arti
cle declares. “It is hidden away
down back alleys — in laundries,
bakeries, restaurant kitchens,
small machine shops, or saw
mills where illegally employed
youngsters are whisked out of
sight when the inspector comes
around.”
A lot of it, too, is out in the
open, the’magazine says—on big
ranches and plantations, in bowl
ing alleys, in messenger work and
other jobs where children toil ex
cessively long hours, often after
a day in school, ,and sometimes
up to midnight. Many of these
jobs are “unhealthful and moral
ly dangerous,” the magazine con
tends.
“It is time Americans stopped
)>eing bamboozled by arguments
for child labor concocted by those
with selfish interest in employ
ment of children,” the magazine
adds.
Extension Of
Trade Program
Urged By AFL
Washington. — The American
j Federation of Labor announced
Its support of the proposed ex
tension of the Reciprocal Trade
Agreements Act.
The AFL position was present
ed to the House Ways and Means
Committee by Walter J. Mason,
AFL national legislative represen
tative. who testified on behalf of
President William Green.
While backing the principle un
derlying the reciprocal trade
program, Mr. Mason urged the
committee to adopt measures
which would strengthen the ad
ministration of the program. He
proposed that labor be given a
greater voice in the determination
of tariffs, and that the U. S.
Tariff Commission be accorded
•‘full recognition in the adjust
ment of tariff rates.”
In urging the 3-year extension
of the agreement, Mr. Mason
stressed the need for better trade
relations as a means of attaining
economic stability throughout the
world. He said:
“The advantages of reducing
♦
trade barriers and expanding
world trade are too numerous and
well-known to be enumerated here
in any detail. As workers in the
United States we benefit by an
expanding world trade in two
particotar respects: (1) Over 2,
000,000 workers in this country
are dependent upon exports for
their jobs; the most recent anal
ysis of the Bureau of Labor Stat
istics indicates that the employ
ment of nearly 2,400,000 workers
in the first half of 1947 was de
pendent upon exports. (2) As
consumers we are able to pur
chase foreign-made goods, which
otherwise would not be available
for consumption in this country.
‘If the principle of reducing
trade barriers is valid at all, it
ia valid with reference to the
trade barriers of the United
States. If stability can be
achieved, it can be achieved only
if this country is willing to pur
chase more products from other
nations than heretofore. .We
must become more import-minded.
Only in this way can the rest
of the world obtain the dollar*
which are necessary to enable
them to make their purchase from
us.
“The chief instrument by which
this nation can contribute to
wards a progressive reduction in
world trade barriers is the Re
ciprocal Trade Agreements pro
gram. Under this program, this
country has already reduced its
duties by some 50 per cent on
the average; and we have very
few quotas on imports and no
embargo at all. Because of our
stake, as workers in a free so
ciety, in developing a peaceful
and prosperous world, we firmly
support a three-year extension of
this program.”
WESTERN DISTRICT
(Costinned froirf Pace 1)
tie quirk that has been worrying
you can be aired out here. You
can profit from this.
“The Open Forum will be over
in plenty of time for you and
your lady to get ready for the
Banquet at 6:30. A good and
plentiful meal will be served.
"We assure you that speaking
will be cut to a minimum with
a maximum of information to be
furnished you at the banquet.
You will get the latest dope on
what the Postal Employee can
expect from the 81st Congress,
and when to expect it.
“There will be a dance begin
ning at 9:00 P. M. (no kidding).
Just how good it will be is en
tirely up to you. We will have
good music and girls that can
dance as you want to dance. It
will be a humdinger of a dance,
well worth the trip. (Of course,
if you get over in a comer poli
ticing with two other guys, like
some I could mention, it won’t
be much of a dance for you.)
“One thing. Our refreshments
will consist of Cokes and 7ups.
Your refreshment may consist of
whatever additions you desire.
“We Vill make the registration
fee as low as possible, but we
will have for you a first class
meal and shindig. We want you
to come and you need to be here.
Please let us know how many to
expect from your office. We are
enclosing a card for that pur
pose. We would like to know
by Wednesday, February 16, 1949,
as we have to make arrange
ments with the hotel.
Please make your room reser
vations direct with the hotel.
“Looking for you,
“ELIZABETH BRADBURN,
“Committee Chairman, Local 375.”
h
Benord's
Gulf Service
Complete One Stop Service
1600 South Boulevard
Telephone 5*9193
CHARLOTTK, N. C.
M. LEE HEATH
REAL ESTATE
824V* East Trade Street Telephone 4*6469
Charlotte, N. C,
FEDERAL WORK
FORCE INCREASES
Washington.—The government’s
civilian work force at home roae
1 <5.400 last month to a total of
1.896.000. Reporting this, the
Civil Service Commmission noted
that the capital itself had 211,
000 at work on December 1, a
j rise of 1,600 in the month. The
I figures are for executive depart
iments and agencies. Inside and
outside the country, tlje employ
ment total was 2,100,300.
| -
U. S. POPULATION RISES;
TOTAL PUT AT 148.966,990
Washington. — The Bureau of
the Census reported the popula
tion of the United States stood
at about 148,000,000 at the year's
end, roughly 12.5 per eent higher
than the 131,669,275 counted in
the last decennial census in 1940.
j The final approximation for
! 1948 represented a population in
'crease during the year of about
3.000. 000.
WHIPS CIO IN POLL TE8T
Buffalo. — The AFL’s Interna
tional Ladies Garment Workers
Union whipped the CIO’s Textile
Workers Union in a collective
bargaining election held among
employes of the Seneca Knitting
Mills Company at Seneca Falls
and Auburn, according to an an
nouncement by the National La
bor Relations Board here,
j The AFL union received 172
! votes of the company’s workers
against 64 ballots cast for the
CIO affiliate.
It Pay* To Trade With
BOGGETT
LUMBER CO.
Ill R. Park Ava. Phene 6179
WU R I iIztR
uinos
Price, Begla At
$525.00
Term. HI Cash, S25 per m.
Write. Wire. Pbeae
Per fitiln
Parker45 art mt Co.
Sine* UN
1U W. Trade Pbeae HI
W. F. Phillips
PLASTERING CONTRACTOR
4011 N. Tryon St. Telephone 2-0351
Charlotte, N. C.
HUNTER ELECTRIC COMPANY
CONTRACTING AND REPAIRS
221 West Second St. J x Phone 3-335T
Charlotte, N. C.
’ EYEREADY PLUMBING fc HEATING COMPANY
115 North Myers Street Telephone 2-2862
0 I 4
Charlotte, N. C. '
TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
HOME & FIRM CENTER
119 South Brevard
Charlotte, N. C.
Telephone 9405
PURITY MFE
400 East Trade Street
J. T. Meleos, Owner
QUALITY RESTAURANT
301 North Tryon Street
Charlotte, N. C.
Magic of the Telephone
Your telephone, can do more trick* than a vaudeville
magician. It can’t sit on its hind legs, but it can stop a
corporation’s board meeting dead. It can’t whistle Dixie,
but it can bring news faster than press or radio. It can’t
balance a ball on its dial, but it can tell you where to buy
yours flowers and clothes.
How? Time Service does it. Time Service puts clever
advertising messages in 10,000 ears every day . . . right
here in Charlotte, where it counts. Cost? Less than a
penny a call.
237 North Try on Street
Charlotte. North Carolina
Mayfair Hotel Buildin*
Telephone Mill
    

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