North Carolina Newspapers

    Local Labor
A busy session of Charlotte
Central Labor Union was held
Shis week at which time legis
lative matters came up for a
lengthy discussion. The legisla
tive committee, consisting of
Walter Hooker, chairman, John
Iovett, and H. A. Stalls, was
asked to arrange for a confer
ence with President C. A. Fink
«f the North Carolina Federation,
ever the week-end for a thor
ough discussion of the proposed
£hrevc Labor Bill now before
the House.
President C. L. Albea called the
meeting to order with Secretar
ies Morse and Prcsson ill their
respective posts. Invocation was
given by Brother Rodgers, fol
lowed by a pledge of allegiance
to the Flag.
The Minutes of the previous
meeting were read and approved
and then came the roll call of
officers and trustees, with almost
nil being chalked up as present.
A communication was read
from the Asheville Building
Trades Council relative to the
imposed new Labor Bill and the
matter was held in abeyance in
•order that the Charlotte Central
labor Union Legislative Commit
tee may have* time to confer with
President C. A. Fink over the
week-end.
The report of the Fanancial
Secretary Morse for the month
nhowed a nice balance on hand
and it was received by the body
with congratulations to Secretary
Morse from the chair. /
Brother John Lovett, chairman
of the 1949 State Federation
Convention Committee, reported
that arrangements have been
made with local hotels for hold
ing the convention here begin
ning on August 8th. Mr. Lovett
reported that plans are being per
fected and within a short time
Ilia committee will contact all
the Charlotte affiliates! unions
telling them about what will be
expected of them in rounding out
the convention plans.
The repors from Local Unions
were then . heard and the infor
mation received indicated that
Charlotte unions are doing very
nicely at present. The Carpen
ters reported that they are plan
ning to hold a series of meet
ings in other cities of the State
in order to acquaint members
of their trade and others into the
problems facing Norh Carolina
Unionist. A meeting in this
connection is scheduled for Mor
ganton Friday night of this week.
Others will be held in Hickory,
I Lenoir, Gastonia and other cities,
it was stated. The Carpenters
invite all other Unions to partici
pate in these good fellowship
gatherings. President Albea named
J a committee to represent Char
lotte Central Labor Union on the
tours, consising of Johnt Lovett,
Walter Hooker, J, L. Adams, and
Mark G. Hazel rigg.
Brother Hooker, Electrical
Workers Business Agent, report
ed that an election was held in
I the Rock Hill Celanese plant this
I week to determine the bargaining
, units. This election was peti
! tioned for some time ago by
the Machinists and due to the
fact that the electrical workers
were involved they also were
represented.
A. F. L. Rpresentative A. E.
Brown delivered a splendid ad
dress under the good of the
order heading which was well
received. Brother Brown has been
on the staff of the North Caro
lina Federation of Labor for 11
years and is well acquainted in
I-abor circles in the whole State.
Mr. Brown's talk had to do with
the proposed Labor legislation
now before the General As
sembly. He also cited the prob
lems of State and International
Unions have in trying to do
business under the present anti,
closed shop laws.
One hundred and eighty mil
lion dollars has been spent by
U. S. Unions under the Taft
Hurtley Act in trying to protect
themselves, he said.
IFS WAFFLE TIME
This is the season that family or guests
really go for waffles . . . ideal for Sunday
morning breakfast, or for a light supper
after a mid-day Sunday dinner.
Mix your batter ahead of time and store in
the refrigerator, but leave out egg whites
and baking powder until just before baking.
Then dissolve baking power in a little water
and mix into batter. Last of all, add the
beaten egg whites, folded in.
'Always have your batter cold. Mixing ahead
of time insures cold batter, but then waffles
impromptu are fun, too. In that case, stir in
a few ice cubes, but of course decrease milk
in proportion.
If you’re having company, a waffle iron at
each end of the table speeds up supply.
(Festive, too!)
/f...
DUKE POWER COMPANY
1/juJmonfr Cmd&hcu,
Charlotte Labor
Vitally Interested
(CntiiMd from Pago 1)
North Carolina Building Crafts would find themselves in
if the measure becomes a law. , -
The Building Craft*, with but
few exceptions, deal with indi
vidual contractors on individual
jobs, and ordinarily three or
more months is required in which
to conduct an election to determ
ine a bona fide bargaining unit.
This lapse of time would, the
tradesmen claim, leave them
holding the bag without a closed
shop agreement, because in most
instances the jobs they are work
ing on are finished before an
election could be held.
The conference has been ar
ranged for Sunday morning in
the Labor Temple in Salisbury.
Something Doin’ In South
GEORGIA WORKERS
VOTE UNION
Atlanta, Ga. — International
Chemical Workers Union an
nounces the winning of bargain
ing rights in a two to one vote
with the General Chemical Co.
COTTON OIL MILL
GOES UNION
Cartersville, Ga. — Petition for
election has been filed at the
Southern Cotton Oil Company,
Cartersville, on behalf of the In
ternational Chemical Workers Uru
1 ion.
I --
1 MORE CHEMICAL WORKERS
LaGrange, Ga.—Swift A Com
pany, Fertilizer Works, at La
Grange, has declined to recognize
International Chemical Workers
TAFT-HARTLEY REPEAL
DRIVE GROWS HOT AS
HEARINGS NEAR END
(Continued From Page 1)
ery union leader has had “a law
yer tied to his coattail.”
4. Startling and effective sup
port for the closed shop was pro
vided by an outstanding employ
er representative, Paul M. Geary,
executive vice president of the
National Electrical Contractors
Association. He testified that
under closed shop conditions his
organization and the AFL Inter
national Brotherhood of Electric
al Workers have built up ma
chinery which has functioned ef
fectively and productively for 29
years without a strike. “You
cannot have a responsible union
unless you give it the means of
achieving responsibility,” he said.
It is believed certain that the
Senate Labor Committee, with
solid Democratic support and pos
sibly with the help of two or
three Republican votes, will okay
the Thomas bill virtually as it ift
However, a free-for-all is expect
ed when the measure comes to
the Senate floor, for under Sen
ate rules any number of amend
ments can be offered from the
floor and voted upon before a fi
nal vote is taken on the bill.
In this way Senator Taft and
his followers hope to Insert into
the Thomas bill many of the sep
arate provisions of the Taft
Hartley Act which will be
knocked out entirely in the com
mittee draft. This piecemeal at
tack is likely to become danger,
ous unless organized labor and
its friends in the Senate maintain
constant vigilance and are able
to muster enough votes to repeal
each new assault.
POSTAL CLERKS DISTRICT
MEETING HUGE SUCCESS
(Continued From Page 1)
gressional District.
9:00—Dance — Music by “Zig
gy” Hurwits Combo.
The meeting was made pos
sible by members of Local 375,
National Federation of Post Of
fice Clerks, the Woman’s Auxili
ary to 375 and the following com
mittees:
Registration—S. F. Blackweld
er, chairman; Auxiliary to No.
375, and i. (F. Cullingford.
Entertainment — “Pete" Brad
burn, chairman; “Skinny" Lee, C.
R. Mitchell, and James Baxter.
Program—Bill Moon, chairman.
Toastmaster—Wm. S. Lowing.
THE COMMERCIAL
NATIONAL BANK
Charlotte. N. C.
*
Union without an NLRB election.
That election is now scheduled
for March 3rd.
MONSANTO ELECTION
IS SCHEDULED
Columbia, Tenn. — A National
Labor Relations Board election in
Monsanto Chemical Company will
be held not later than 30 days
following February 11. The In
ternational Chemical Workers Un
ion is the petitioning union.
UNION CONTRACT ON
BARGAINING TABLE
Valdosta, Ga. — The Glidden
Paint Company, Valdosta, oper
ates a pine products plant in that
area and has agreed to recognise
the International Chemical Work
ers Union as bargaining agent for
the employes and the contract Is
now being negotiated.
CARPENTERS TO
VOTE MARCH 3
Greensboro, N. C. — United
Brotherhood and Joiners of Amer
ica has an NLRB election sched
uled at the Ottinger Lumber
Works, Greensboro, March 3rd.
NEW8WRITERS ORGANIZE
Savannah, Ga. — Newswriters
Federal Labor Union was chart
ered January 22nd by the Ameri
can Federation of Labor, as a
directly affiliated organization.
This new Union is composed of
the newswriters in the Savannah
territory.
WORKERS RECOGNIZE
NEED OF RECREATION
New York.—Parents belonging
to AFI. unions are manifesting an
increasing awareness of the im
portance of regular recreational
activity for themselves and their
children, and an activity which is
rapidly growing in popularity in
union families is indoor roller
skating, it was learned here.
According to statistics compiled
by the Roller Skating Institute
of America, roller skating is win
ning hundred of new recruits
daily among adult trade unionists
as well as among the children of
union members. And these un
ion members and union members’
children are deriving vast enjoy
ment and their health is benefit
ing greatly as a result of their
participation in one of the na
tions’ most poular sports, it is
reported.
Irwin N. Rosee, president of
the RSIA, commenting on the
recent heightened interest in
roller skating among union wage
earners and their families, said:
“We are not surprised. Trade
unionists are sensible people.
They understand the need for
wholesome recreation, both for
themselves and for their children.
Such recreation is available today
in the hundreds of modern roller
skating rinks around the country.
“As good citizens and con
scientious parents, union workers
we aware of the pressing need
to reduce juvenile delinquency.
In city after city, our research
studies have shown, the juvenile
• WurlFIzer
ianos
Parkor-dankor Co.
1U W. Trad*
delinquency rate has taken a
sharp dip once the youngsters
were brought in off the streets
and given the opportunity to
have active fun in a wholesome,
healthful environment.”
OUR BEST GRADE8 HEAVY
BREED CHICKS
200 for $15.00
Send for Price List—
Save Money
WORTHWHILE CHICKS
101 W. North Avenue
Baltimore 1, Md.
3-17
Some of The Things We
Lend Money on
Diamond*
Watches
Jewelry
Men's Clothing
Tools
Silverware
Shot Cbm
Rifle*
Pistole
Y ranks
Addins Machine*
Suit Cum
Musical luatnuueate
Kodaks
Typewriters
AD Business Strictly Confidential. When tn need
of Money We Never Fail Yon.
8m m for borgaia la diaaKxxb, watches, jewelry, clothing, ate.
RELIABLE LOAN GO.
Ml BAST TRADE STREET
Large Size Double Door
ALL STEEL
Utility
Cabinets
WERE $29.93
Now
$1995
This all metal Utility has
five shelves. Plenty of stor
age space. Ideal for kitchen,
bath room or oat door stor
age space. Durably built,
white baked on enamel finish.
CORNER TRADE AND COLLEGE STREETS
PHONE 4-l«ll
Magic of the Telephone
Your telephone can do more tricks than a vaudeville
magician. It can’t sit on its hind legs, but it can stop a
corporation’s board meeting dead. It cant whistle Dixie,
but it can bring news faster than press or radio. It can’t
balance a ball on its dial, but it can tell you where to buy
yours flowers and clothes.
How? Time Service does it. Time Service puts clever
advertising messages in 10,000 ears every day . . . right
here in Charlotte, where it counts. Cost? Less than a
penny a call.
m Nertfc Tryea Street
CkerletU. Nertk Carotin*
Mayfair Hatal
    

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