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CHARLOTTE LABOR JOURNAL
Oldest
Bona Fide
AFL
Newspaper
in
North Carolina
>111; NO. J$
VOL. XV
CHARLOTTE, N. C„ THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 1949
Subscription Price $2.00 Year
Employer Found Guilty Of
Using Police Against Union
Washington.—An example of the way in which unscrup
ulous. financially powerful employers stoop to anything in
efforts to destroy labor unions was brought to light in a re
cent decision of the National Labor Relations Board. In
a unanimous ruling a 3-man panel acting for the NLRB
found the Bibb Manufacturing Company guilty of circulating
an “anti-union" newspaper containing threatening state
ments. and of corrupting the use of normal police power to
hamstring legitimate union activities.
The company employs 9.000
workers in plants in Macon and
Porterdale. Ga. In the latter
town, all municipal employes, in
cluding the mayor, are company
employes, and the firm owns all
property except the churches and
the railroad right-or-way. It was
here that the illegal police activ
ities took place.
The publication Tnvolved is a
4-page weekly called The Trump
et, published independently at Co
lumbus.
The company bought 2.000 sub
scriptions and had them circu
lated by rotation, so that at laast
one copy reached each of the em
ployes once a month.
The board found the publica
tion contained anti—union state
ments inciting physical violence,
threatening loss of employment
for union activity and promising
benefits for repudiation of union
organization.
The board’s order was directed
soley against the Bibb Company,
which was ordered to cease caus
ing distribution of The Trumpet
or any other publication “calcu
lated to interfere with, restrain
or coerce its employes.”
The company also was directed
to cease causing the Porterdale
police to engage in surveillance
of union organizers and the un
ion activities of its employes; re
instate with back pay four em
ployes who were discharged at
Macon for union activities and
cease intefering with its em
ployes’ rights to self-organization
under the law.
The decision said:
“The surveillance activities of
the police force had the neces
aary effect of intimidating the em
ployes. and. as the record shows,
curtailed the dissemination of un
ion information. Whatever may
be the employer’s privilege in in
stigating legitimate police activ
ities, it is clear that an employer
cannot utilize a police agency to
engage in intimidatory trailing
and surveillance where no legiti
mate police function is served
thereby.
“Here there was no breach of
the peace, actual or anticipated.
To interfere with lawful and
peaceful activities protected by
the act on the assumption that
union activities are inherently
dangerous to the peace of the
community negates the principles
upon which this act rests.
“We are convinced by the rec
ord as a whole that the respond
ent (company) sought to, and
did, use the police department
as an instrumentality to impede
selforganization of its employes.”
The board declared that none
of the Porterdale officials was
paid for his public service and
is “economically dependent on the
company.”
The board asserted the com
pany “had the constitutional right
to campaign against the union
by expressions of views and
opinions, free of coercion and re
straint.”
“However,- it is abundantly
clear,” it continued, “that at least
some statements in The Trumpet
ware designed to defleat self
organization not by appealing to
the employes’ sense of reason
but by inciting physical violence,
by threatening loss of employ
ment, mi by promises ef benefit."
WRIGHT SAYS NEW DEAL
HAS HELPED ALL OF US
Cincinnati, Ohio. — The pros
perous and stable economy made
possible under the social and ec
onomic legislation of the past 16
years has benefited fanners, and
business and professional men,
as well as workers, Assitant Sec
retary of Labor Ralph Wright
told the International Brother
hood of Paper Makers here.
Speaking on “The New Deal
and The Fair Deal," Wright re
viewed the enactment of legisla
tion promoted by Presidents
Roosevelt and Truman such as
the Wagner Act, the Social Se
curity Act, the Fair Labor Stand,
ards. Act, and other progressive
legislation.
Wright also outlined some of
the events which took place be
fore the enactment of the Taft
Hartley Act. He referred to sta
tistics on strikkes after World
War II. He added that “the en
emies of labor did not tell the
American people that in 1919
strikes involved 20.8 per cent of
the workers and that in 1946
strikes involved only 14.5 .per
cent of all employed workers."
The Assistant Secretary also
listed some of the provisions of
the Thomas Bill. He said that
r
Impatience is
VTncle!
CtyvngM I n- tnt mtcmmST—i Am
ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF
LABOR RALPH WRIGHT
the Thomas Bill repeals the Taft*
Hartley Act, re-enacts the Wag
ner Act, and makes certain
amendments in that law. It
would retain the present National
Labor Relations Board member
(Continned Oa Page 4)
VOTING PLACES
CITY PRIMARY. APRIL 25. 1949
CITY ELECTION, MAY 3, 1949
Following is a list of the Voting Precincts and their
locations, as furnished The Labor Journal by the office
of Elections Chairman Brenizer:
Precinct I—Court House
Precinct 2—501 S. Alexander St.
Precinct 3—401 East 9th St.
Precinct 4—1600 N. Brevard St.
Precinct 5—601 North Graham St.
Precinct 6—329 Irwin Ave.
Precinct 7—825 Westbrook Drive
Precinct 8—2000 North Allen St.
Precinct 9—Y. M. C. A., E. 36th St.
Precinct 10—3501 Plaza Road
Precinct 11—1620 Club Road
Precinct 12—Midwood School, Central Ave.
' Precinct 13—1400 Louise Ave.
Precinct 14—1241 East 10th St. *
Precinct 15—537 Lamar Ave:
Precinct 16—2539 Westmoreland Ave.
Precinct 17—1028 Waterman Ave.
Precinct 19—2701 East Seventh St.
Precinct 19—Mint Museum. Eastover
Precinct 20—500 Cherokee Road
Precinct 21—111 Barnett Place. OfT 1800 E. 4th St.
Precinct 22—2108 Vail Ave.
Precinct 23—1601 Park Drive
Precinct 24—2131 Raddiffe Ave.
Precinct 25—1026 Providence Road
Precinct 26—Myers Park Club. Myers Park
Precinct 27—Avondale Com. House. Avondale & Lilac
Precinct 28—1612 Kenilworth Ave.
Precinct 29—Dilworth School, 405 E. Park Ave.
Precinct 30—1716 Lyndhurst Ave.
Precinct 31—1927 Dilworth Rd„ W.
Precinct 32—1004 Poindexter Drive
Precinct 33—Wilmore School. 428 West Boulevard
Precinct 31—Alexander Graham Jr. High School
Precinct 35—Wesley Hts. School, 128 S. Summit Ave.
Precinct 35—Seversville School. 1701 Sumter Ave.
Precinct 39—2436 Wilkinson Blvd.
Precinct 39—West Charlotte High School
Precinct 40—Fairview Homes, 1026 Oak lawn Ave.
Precinct 41—Hutchison School, 1400 Hutchison Ave.
Precinct 42—1607 Statesville Ave.
(Additional Data On Page 3)
Production Drop
Loses Momentum
New York.—The year-end decline in industrial activity
“has definitely lost momentum,’’ the business survey com
mittee of the National Association of Purchasing Agents
reported today. %
Production is now generally at levels that are being main
tained and in some instances improved, the committee said,
basing its conclusions on March reports of purchasing ex
ecutives.
Mxteen per cent or tne re
ports for March show increased
production, while 48 per cent
hold a steady program of opera
tions. many on curtailed sched
ules established after four months’
decline,” the survey statement
added.
“Confirming that trend, 16 per
cent report some increase in order
backlogs, while 46 per cent have
maintained the February position
and, by that guage, show no
further shrinkage of demand.’’
A check of NAPA members,
who reported production and
back-order in declines in Novem
ber and December are maintain
ing or increasing production,
while 54 per cent have improved
order book positions.
“Unless that situation reflects
only a seasonal adjustment, it
could be assumed that industries
which recorded declines in Jan
uary, February and March, may
show a corresponding improve
ment in April, May and June as
production schedules, inventories
and commitments are worked into
balance at new levels,” the re
port said.
Timing of price adjustments is
found to be a major considera
tion by purchasing agents tms
year as the trend is toward a
lower volume of business, the
committee added. The question
is: Will prices be reduced to
maintain production and employ
ment, or held up and the reduc
tion made in production and em
ployment?
“The predominant opinion is
that prices will be reduced by
i efficient management, to main
i tain volume,” the group conclud
I ed. “There is a strong counter
; opinion that many wll attempt
i to hold prices for some time be
' fore reducing. Competition in
most industries will determine
the answer.”
The report also made theaa
points:
Commodity prices: “Broader
quantity discounts are appearing.
(Continued on Pago 3)
* ? ■
MICHAEL JOSEPH GALVIN
Nui(dbrPrwM**l Tnualtk*
Hate Secretary af Lata.
GM.VW JUKES OATH
AS IMDERSEGRETARY
Washington, D. C. — Michael
Joseph Galvin took the oath o(
office as Under Secretary of La
bor on March 14th in the pres
ence * of Secretary of Labor
Maurice J. Tobin, high govern
ment and labor-union officials,
Mrs. Galvin and the five Galvin
children.
Judge Matthew F. McGuire, of
the United States District Court
for the District of Columbia, ad
ministered the oath. On hand for
the ceremony were 100 friends and
relatives of the new Labor De
partment official from Massachu
setts.
Goveornment officials attending
the ceremony included: Julius A.
Krug, Secretary of the Interior:
James E. Webb, Under Secretary
of State; Paul M. Herzog Chair
man of the National Labor Re
lations Board; Representative
John W. McCormack, of Massa
chusetts, majority leader of the
Bouse of Representatives; and
numerous bureau officials of the
Labor and other Departments.
Secretary Tobin introduced Wil
liam Green, president of the
(Ceatinned On Page 4)
SAMPLE GROUP OF INTRA-STATE WORKERS. 90 PER
LENT OF WHOM ARE WOMEN. REC EIVE
LESS THAN 40 C ENTS AN HOUR
RALEIGH, March 28.—“While Congress debates the
merits of raising the minimum wage to 75 cents an hour,
a defenseless and not insignificant minority of North Caro
lina workers are being pai<| wages more in keeping with
the year 1923 than the year 1949.” Forrest H. Shuford,
North Carolina Commissioner of Labor, said today.
$4,500,000 WORTH OF
FREE MUSIC GIVER RY
MUSICIANS IN 3 YEARS
A unique labor union project
will be completed this year as
the American Federation of
Musicians (AFL) spends its
final appropriation of $1,300,212
.42 for free mlisic throughout
the United States and Canada, it
was announced by James C. Pe
trillo, president of the Federa
tion. In the three-year period
ending January SI, 1950, the un
ion mill have spent nearly $4,
500.000.
Although the Federation’s pub
lic service, which provided more
than 20,01)0 free performances
in 1947 and 1948 in hospitals,
parks and for worthy causes,
was a casualty of the Taft
Hartley Law, the musicians' In
duced the recording industry to
continue the program. Last De
cember the Music Performance
Trust Fund was established un
der a trustee appointed by the
recording and transcription in
This year's appropriation by
the Federation assures the con.
tinuity of the widely-hailed free
music projects until the trustee
makes known his plans. There
is no connection between the two
funds.
New York. — A 130-page di
rectory of labor unions in New
York state has just been pub
lished by the State Department
of Labor.
summarizing we most recent
information received by the De
partment of Labor, Shuford said
tht 539 workers employed by 68
service and mercantile firms in
19 typical North Carolina cities
and towns are being paid wages
less than 40 cents an nour. More
than 90 per cent of these 539
workers are women, he added.
“In many instances, wages
amounted to 25. 30 or 35 *cents
an hour," Commissioner Shuford
said. “Such rates of pay, of
course, definitely are not repre
sentative of wages paid in the
majority of intra-state busi
nesses. They are exceptions to *
the rule. But unfortunately, they
are frequent exceptions, not rare
exceptions.”
Shuford said the 68 firms pay
ing some workers under 40 cents
fcn hour included restaurants,
drug stores, hotels, laundries,
grocery stores, clothing stores,
department stores and 5c and 10c
variety stores. The cooks, dish
washers, other kitchen employees,
fountain clerks, waitresses, de
livery boys, maids, various laun
dry occupations janitors, stock
room employees, and, salesladies.
The Labor Commissioner
pointed out that these workers
are employed in intra-state busi
ness and do not have the protec
tion of the Federal Wage-Hour
Law.
The 19 cities and towns from
which the Labor Department’s
information came represents a
cross section of North Carolina
municipalities from one end of
the State to the other, he said.
April Is Cancer
Control Month
Have you had a physical check-up in the last 12 months?
Deaths in Mecklenburg County, December 19-January
16-February 12. Total previous quarter, 44.
At least 15 of these could have been saved had they re
ceived proper treatment in time.
Estimated number of diagnosed cancer cases in Meck
lenburg County, 600. Potential (having one of seven
danger signals, 400. Total 1,000.
This is a big field to cover with our limited personnel
and funds. We need you to help us carry our Message of
Hope. CAN WE COUNT ON YOU?
Mrs. Louise Davis was employed as Secretary of Educa
tion and Service on January 17 and is doing a good job of
arranging programs and rendering our services to our
established cases.
We want to express special thanks to the persons who
have made voluntary contributions to the Cause of Cancer
Controls, as Memorials to friends or loved ones.
MRS. C. d. DUNCAN.
. , County Commander.
APRIL IS CANCER CONTROL MONTH. Your contri
bution will ensure the continuance o f this program -tti
Mecklenburg County. Sponsored by the Charlotte Woman’s
Club.
President Green Hails
Graham Appointment
Washington.—The appointment of Dr. Frank P. Gra
ham president of the University of North Carolina to
the U. S. Senate was hailed by AFL President William
Green.
In a statement issued here Mr. Gre£n said
“We regard Dr. Graham's appointment as im import
ant addition to the liberal and progressive forces rep
resenting southern states in the Senate.
Dr. Graham was named to replace Senator J. Melville
Broughton who died recently. The former member of
the National War Labor Board will serve until the 1950
general election.
    

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